Urbanization In A Federalist Context

Overview

The emergence of America as a metropolitan-urban society has had profound consequences for every phase of national life, but nowhere has its effects been greater than in the domain of government. The growth of the city and its evolution into the metro-city has led to problems more complex and intense than any previously known. These problems command the concern and resources of all governments, federal as well as state and local; for as they have gained general attention they ...

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Overview

The emergence of America as a metropolitan-urban society has had profound consequences for every phase of national life, but nowhere has its effects been greater than in the domain of government. The growth of the city and its evolution into the metro-city has led to problems more complex and intense than any previously known. These problems command the concern and resources of all governments, federal as well as state and local; for as they have gained general attention they have emerged as national problems.

Coincident with national involvement in problems once held to be local has come a rise in federal government relations with the cities. Such relations, though in fact of long standing, have increased greatly in number and intensity since 1933. The result is a significant expansion in the practice of federalism, one marked by the emergence of the cities as partners in the federal system. Urbanization in a Federalist Context treats the expanded federal partnership in urban growth and argues that it is not a fact to be welcomed.

Martin traces the expansion of federal authority in the United States from the 1930s through the 1960s. He shows how local issues become national issues, and also how national authority expands, affecting all aspects of location government. The developments he explores reflect a federal system in the process of constant but evolutionary growth. Martin reveals why the relationship between the federal system and metro-cities is a flexible arrangement, capable of adjusting to new demands-but not without its own risks. This classic will be of continuing interest to those concerned about the consequences of the expansion of government authority in the United States.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780202363301
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/1/2009
  • Pages: 210
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Roscoe C. Martin was professor of political science at Syracuse University. He is the author of numerous books including Democracy in the Administrative State, Water for New York: A Study in State Administration of Water Resources, and River Basin Administration and the Delaware.

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Table of Contents

l. A Nation of Cities The Urbanization of America Emergence of a New Society The Country and the City Urban Dwellers and Farm Folk Some Consequent Problems 2. The American System: The Many and the One The Federal System The Place of the Cities The Cities and the States The Cities and theN ation Quest for Operational Effectiveness An Evolving Federalism 3. Unequal Partners: The Case of the Reluctant State State Constitutions Representative Government Organization for Administration Resources Programs Horizons Conclusion 4. Emergence of an Urban Partner Government and Civil Aviation The Issue of Federal Aid The Recipient Government Dilemma The Two Positions Congressional Action and Reaction The Crystallization of Policy 5. The Expanded Partnership: Nature Rise of Federal-City Relations Three Joint Programs Federal-Aid Airport Program Urban Renewal Low-Rent Public Housing Some Observations on the Expanded Partnership 6. Three Views of the Expanded Partnership Washington: The View from Above The Community: The View from Below The State House: The Midway View 7. The Expanded Partnership: Appraisal Consequences Anticipated and Unanticipated Problems Real and Fancied Local Government Organization The Metropolitan Problem The Expanded Partnership and the States The Expanded Partnership and Democratic Government Index

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