U.S. Army Helicopter Names In Vietnam

U.S. Army Helicopter Names In Vietnam

5.0 2
by John Brennan
     
 
The personal naming of military aircraft in the Vietnam War is not unique in American history. What is unique is the near total lack of documentation of the existence of those names on in-country Army helicopters during the 1961-'73 conflict in S. E. Asia. This book remedies that once and for all!

-Over 3,000 Army copter names cross-referenced by Unit
-Details on

Overview

The personal naming of military aircraft in the Vietnam War is not unique in American history. What is unique is the near total lack of documentation of the existence of those names on in-country Army helicopters during the 1961-'73 conflict in S. E. Asia. This book remedies that once and for all!

-Over 3,000 Army copter names cross-referenced by Unit
-Details on Origin, Time Period, Location, Function, Type, Serial Number, Artist, Crew and more
-More than 2,000 contributor names listed and cross-referenced
-Perfect for veterans, hobbyists, historical researchers, KIA families, sociologists, aviation enthusiasts and students of Americana-just to name a few
-Includes 40 rare photographs

U.S. Army Helicopter Names in Vietnam provides an essential and heretofore missing puzzle piece in helping to identify and better understand our warrior brothers, fathers, uncles, sons and friends who manned these incredible flying machines in the skies of Vietnam.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781555716943
Publisher:
L & R Publishing, LLC
Publication date:
05/01/2011
Pages:
420
Sales rank:
1,096,378
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.86(d)

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U.S. ARMY HELICOPTER NAMES IN VIETNAM 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Bernie-Weisz More than 1 year ago
Without exception, every make and model of Army helicopters that served from 1962 until the end of the war was ornamented by either a personalized name and affixed illustration. John Brennan's book has a lot to do with these periods, as his book shows that the visuals on these propeller driven war birds reflected the mood of the times. A piece sign painted on a "Huey Slick" was non existent in 1965. "U.S. Helicopter Names in Vietnam" gives the reader an in depth breakdown of these personalized abstractions, where America's primary war chariot was indeed the helicopter. Why would someone even care about that? A lot of reasons. Many Vietnam Vets, particularly helicopter crews during their one year tour had formed a deep camaraderie with each other, a bond formed out of the exigencies of combat. They would never again experience the esprit de corps the conditions of South Vietnam presented. These men formed an unbreakable loyalty to each other, sharing intense friendships with painful losses. At the end of their tour, departing Vets always promised to keep in touch with the men staying, and good byes were emotional. Most Veterans going back to what they called "The World" had painful feelings of abandonment and separation issues, however their vows of communication disappeared upon leaving Vietnam. With new relationships, careers and responsibilities, the months after DEROS'ing back into society turned into years, which turned into decades. Many Vietnam Veterans that were in helicopter crews have lost touch with their buddies over the years. A former Gunship pilot might be wondering: "whatever happened to my door gunner," while the design or the motto on his old helicopter's nose is the only strong memory he is left to search with, Brennan's book might very well serve as the magical key. Brennan collected information equally from all four areas of Army Helicopter usage without prejudice. Out of the myriad of outgoing inquisitive e mails, he would try to garnish as much information as he could from what came back to him. . Eventually, he received back over 10,000 e mails with personal information, photos of artwork on helicopters, names of who drew the artwork, etc. If he received a photograph, of say, a Huey, the art work had to be placed with an assigned crew, the dates the helicopter was in service. Through incredible detective work, Brennan was able to break all the information down into an organized system, of which this book is the result. Seventy five percent of the information in his book came from the mass of e mail correspondence and photos attached. The other twenty five percent of data contained in this publication came from web sites, memoirs, reunions and interviews. The final result is over 3000 helicopter names correctly cross -referenced with the helicopter unit that it served with, the type of model the helicopter was (Huey "A,B,C,H or H"), etc. Furthermore, wherever possible Brennan was able to find the helicopter's serial number, it's function ("slick vs gunship") the crew member's names, the artist that drew the name on the helicopter, and the location of the name on the chopper, i.e., the nose, pilot door, etc. An additional bonus is that the book is attractively laced with 40 rare shots of different helicopters with their names clearly displayed. This is an incredible book, simple to understand that will appeal to many groups!
PeteMP More than 1 year ago
John Brennan deserves a big Thank You from everyone in our country. He has spent years and thousands of hours in research and compiling this book. He has preserved for us and future generations an important part of our history that would have been lost had it not been for his efforts. As a Vietnam veteran it means a lot to me personally. It brings back a lot of memories both good and bad. You will not find any place, more information on Vietnam helicopters than John has assembled in this book. The pictures are amazing and gives you some in site as to what it was like in Vietnam. I am honored to be a contributer to this book. I highly recommend it to everyone. Mike Peterson 7/1 Air Cavalry