U.S. Immigration Policy and the Undocumented: Ambivalent Laws, Furtive Lives

U.S. Immigration Policy and the Undocumented: Ambivalent Laws, Furtive Lives

by Helene Hayes
     
 

Hayes analyzes the situation of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and what happens to them in the aftermath of implementation of two key provisions of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) legalization and employer sanctions. Referred to by legislators as a generous and compassionate bill that would legalize much of the undocumented population in our

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Overview

Hayes analyzes the situation of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and what happens to them in the aftermath of implementation of two key provisions of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) legalization and employer sanctions. Referred to by legislators as a generous and compassionate bill that would legalize much of the undocumented population in our midst, it resulted instead in placing a highly vulnerable silent subclass in deeper jeopardy. Hayes traces the history of undocumented immigration, Congressional debate and implementation of IRCA and provides direct access to the faces of the undocumented through original empirical research on the social and economic impact of IRCA on specific groups of undocumented Haitian, Irish, and Salvadoran immigrants.

The general theme is America's ambivalence towards its historic lifeline, new immigrants whether legal or undocumented, and how the two central provisions of IRCA uniquely embodied within the same piece of legislation contradictory and ambivalent attitudes toward immigrants which became the seeds of its implementation difficulties. Hayes looks at the issue of undocumented immigration from a legislative, policy, human rights, and implementation perspective, but she also points beyond national strategies to push factors emanating from the home countries of the undocumented and makes the case that undocumented immigration is a global social problem that needs global solutions. The book is of particular interest to policy makers, scholars, and other researchers and students involved with social policy and welfare, immigration law, and ethnic studies.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Based on her research into Boston's Haitian, Irish, and Salvadoran immigrant communities, Hayes (chief administrator, Good Shepherd Sisters) details the human consequences of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. She considers the ways the law marginalizes undocumented workers, frustrates the administration of services, and diminishes the sense of possibility for whole communities. Chapters describe America's exclusionary impulse, trace the history of undocumented immigration, outline key provisions of IRCA, and gauge the impact of the law. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780275954109
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/30/2001
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
180
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.44(d)

Meet the Author

HELENE HAYES is Chief Administrator of the New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts division of Good Shepherd Sisters, an international congregation of religious women. Dr. Hayes has served as Executive Director of a Haitian Multi-Service Center in Boston and has been an Instructor at the Boston University Continuing Education program. As an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Boston University Graduate School of Social Work and an Instructor at Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, Dr. Hayes has taught social policy analysis and the social welfare system.

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