U.S. Imperialism In Latin America

Overview

Latin America's proximity to the United States made the improvement of relations between the two regions imperative in the first two decades of the 20th century. William Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State for Woodrow Wilson until 1915, was largely responsible for this task. Although Bryan had denounced as imperialistic his predecessors' political and economic intervention in Latin America, his own policies also had an imperialistic tone. Bryan resigned in June 1915, but his actions while in office served as the ...

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Overview

Latin America's proximity to the United States made the improvement of relations between the two regions imperative in the first two decades of the 20th century. William Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State for Woodrow Wilson until 1915, was largely responsible for this task. Although Bryan had denounced as imperialistic his predecessors' political and economic intervention in Latin America, his own policies also had an imperialistic tone. Bryan resigned in June 1915, but his actions while in office served as the foundation for later intervention in both Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

This work details Bryan's attitudes toward Latin America prior to assuming the title of secretary of state, his actions while in office, and his political stance after resignation. Six topical chapters cover Bryan's policies toward Nicaragua, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, the Panama Canal Tolls Controversy, and the Columbian Treaty. The work concludes with an analysis of Bryan's inconsistent attitude on imperialism.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Explains the nature of US intervention in the affairs of Latin America by studying the attitude and policy of William Jennings Bryan. Kaplan (social science, City U. of New York) argues that although Bryan denounced the militaristic policies of past administrations, he was very much an imperialist who, not unlike his predecessors, believed in the superiority of American political and economic institutions over their Latin American counterparts. Eleven chapters discuss Bryan's overall policy and specifically address Nicaragua, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, the Panama Canal, and the Columbian treaty. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

EDWARD S. KAPLAN is Professor in the Social Science Department at New York City Technical College of the City University of New York.

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Table of Contents

Preface
1 Introduction 1
2 Bryan's Early Attitude toward Latin America, 1900-1913 7
3 The Beginnings of a Latin American Policy 23
4 Nicaragua 37
5 Haiti 55
6 The Dominican Republic 69
7 Mexico 87
8 The Panama Canal Tolls Controversy 109
9 The Colombian Treaty 123
10 Latin America after June 1915 137
11 Conclusion 153
Bibliography 157
Index 161
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