U.S. Supreme Court Decisions - Dredd Scott V. Sandford (Rights of Slaves)

U.S. Supreme Court Decisions - Dredd Scott V. Sandford (Rights of Slaves)

by U.S. Supreme Court
     
 
Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. (19 How.) 393 (1857), commonly referred to as The Dred Scott Decision, was a decision by the United States Supreme Court that ruled that people of African descent imported into the United States and held as slaves, or their descendants-whether or not they were slaves-were not protected by the Constitution and could never be citizens of

Overview

Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. (19 How.) 393 (1857), commonly referred to as The Dred Scott Decision, was a decision by the United States Supreme Court that ruled that people of African descent imported into the United States and held as slaves, or their descendants-whether or not they were slaves-were not protected by the Constitution and could never be citizens of the United States. It also held that the United States Congress had no authority to prohibit slavery in federal territories. The Court also ruled that because slaves were not citizens, they could not sue in court. Lastly, the Court ruled that slaves-as chattel or private property-could not be taken away from their owners without due process. The Supreme Court's decision was written by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney.

Although Dred Scott was never overruled by the Supreme Court itself, in the Slaughter-House Cases of 1873 the Court stated that at least one part of it had already been overruled in 1868 by the Fourteenth Amendment.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934255537
Publisher:
El Paso Norte Press
Publication date:
08/15/2010
Series:
U.S. Supreme Court Decisions
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
403 KB

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