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USA Pets
     

USA Pets

by Fodor's Travel Publications
 
If you want a good bed for the night and a warm welcome for you and your four-footed friend, look no further. In every state and in 2,169 cities and towns, Fodor's shows you hundreds of places to stay overnight with your pet. In this comprehensive guide, you'll find 5,219 motels, hotels, B&Bs, lodges, and resorts, in all price ranges. Accompanying each

Overview

If you want a good bed for the night and a warm welcome for you and your four-footed friend, look no further. In every state and in 2,169 cities and towns, Fodor's shows you hundreds of places to stay overnight with your pet. In this comprehensive guide, you'll find 5,219 motels, hotels, B&Bs, lodges, and resorts, in all price ranges. Accompanying each recommendation is a brief description of the property and a complete listing of its facilities and amenities. Want a hotel with an indoor swimming pool? A hot tub and tennis court? It's all here.

Plus, let Today show pet specialist Andrea Arden advise you on getting your pet ready to travel. She'll give you great tips on traveling by car and by air, pet first aid, petiquette, fun places for pet lovers, and useful web sites and other resources.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780676902075
Publisher:
Fodor's Travel Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
06/12/2001
Series:
Fodor's Road Guides USA Series
Pages:
736
Product dimensions:
5.08(w) x 8.46(h) x 0.76(d)

Read an Excerpt


?Happy Traveling with Your Pet

Animals have been an important part of our family life for ages, so it's no surprise more and more people are making their pets a part of family travel. Pets can add to your travel adventures in many ways. Aside from the comfort they offer, pets also open the door to meeting new people. Animals are great conversation starters, and animal lovers are everywhere!

In return for companionship and fun, your pet will require much of your time, just as he does at home. In fact, if you elect to include him, your pet will probably be a major focus of your trip. Days must be planned keeping the pet's needs in mind. Often, this means you aren't as free to spend leisurely hours shopping or dining. Instead, you might consider hiring a pet-sitter or finding a good kennel. Sending your dog to a doggie camp or bringing a dog sitter along on your trip are other options. If you are planning a "get-away-from-it-all" sort of trip, bringing along your pet may not be a good idea.

While the number of travelers accompanied by animals is growing, some hotels are still cautious to put out the welcome mat. In some areas of the country, finding decent accommodations that accept you and your pet can be a daunting task. Be prepared to spend extra time making travel plans.

Take Your Pet or Leave Him?

When deciding whether or not to travel with your pet, try not to let your emotions take precedence over practical concerns, such as your pet's age, temperament, and health. Consider your aspirations for the trip and how you will handle the responsibility of taking care of your pet on the road. If you think it will greatlyhamper your enjoyment, then it may be unfair to you both to take her along.

The best candidates for travel are pets that are even-tempered, well-behaved, sociable, and in good health. If your pet is anxious, aggressive, or is likely to be highly stressed, it is probably in his best interest to make alternative plans, such as finding him boarding or having a pet-sitter stay in your home.

While it is legal to transport an eight-week-old kitten or puppy by plane, it is advisable to wait until he or she is at least 12 weeks old. At eight weeks animals are susceptible to many more diseases because their immune systems are not fully developed. It's also important to control the environment of very young puppies and kittens so they don't have experiences that may frighten them. This is difficult to do while traveling.

Some trips are inappropriate for pets because of the environment, time of year, and nature of the journey. A friend of mine chose to take her six-year-old lab on a cross-country drive from New York to Arizona. She left at the end of June. By the time she reached the Grand Canyon it was mid-July. The heat was tough on her but almost unbearable for her dog. As a result she spent a lot of time worrying about her dog rather than sightseeing. If she had made the trip at a different time of year, it might have been a more pet-friendly adventure.

Who Should Stay
Anxious pets
Noisy, boisterous, or un-house-trained pets
Unfriendly pets
Fearful pets
If your travel plans are not pet-friendly
If weather will be uncomfortable for your pet

and Who Should Go? Calm pets
Well-behaved pets
Friendly pets
Pets who enjoy new experiences
If your travel plans are pet-friendly
If weather permits



Copyright 2001 by Fodor's

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