User-Centered Web Site Development: A Human-Computer Interaction Approach / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $10.90
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 89%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $10.90   
  • New (9) from $62.16   
  • Used (8) from $10.90   

Overview

This is an innovative and timely book that introduces the reader to the human component of Web site design. Readers will be able to do a much better job of writing front ends or other interactive software, as the book describes the creation of user-friendly Web sites. In the context of Human-Computer Interaction and Web design, this book covers such topics as user and task analysis, content organization, visual organization, navigation design, prototyping, and evaluation, as well as color, typography, multimedia, accessibility, globalization. For individuals interested in entering the field of Web page and site design, as well as industrial team workers in HCI and Web site development.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This is the kind of book I've been searching for!" — Robert Renman, Augustana University College

"I used your textbook in draft form this past semester for my undergraduate HCI course. It was fantastic. The students loved it, I loved it, and we had a great time. I think they learned a lot." — Mary Jane Wiltshire, School of Engineering, University of Portland

"I realty like the book and think that it would fit into the course I'm going to teach in the fall." — John K. Estelt, Ohio Northern University

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130411617
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 5/20/2003
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 1,071,532
  • Product dimensions: 8.18 (w) x 10.47 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

Don McCracken is Professor of Computer Science at City College, CUNY, and the author of more than 20 textbooks in computer science. He is a past president of ACM and the 1992 recipient of the ACM SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contributions to Computer Science Education.

Rosalee Wolf is Professor of Computer Science at the School of Computer Science, Telecommunications and Information Systems of DePaul University, where she was the first Director of the HCI program and was instrumental in creating the first bachelor's program and the second master's program in HCI in the United States. A -former NASA fellow, she leads the groundbreaking American Sign Language project at DePaul.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

This text combines an introduction to human-computer interaction (HCI) with an exposition of website development.

No one today needs convincing that the World Wide Web is a major phenomenon. Students are surely convinced, and they desire instruction in developing websites, but they usually see the subject in terms of writing HTML and of associated implementation tools. They often undervalue what the established field of HCI has to contribute to a good website.

This book is intended for such a student and for anyone else who wants to build effective interfaces between people and computers.

Goal

The goal of any course based on the book is to enable students to develop interfaces that are usable: they permit the user to find what he or she wants, find it quickly, and carry out any interaction effectively and efficiently. This goal has much broader applicability than the World Wide Web, of course. But with the Web being pervasive and of much interest to students, we chose to build our presentation around the Web.

Most of today's software is interactive, and most of our graduates will be called upon to write front ends or other interactive software as part of their jobs. People who have mastered the material in this book will be able to do a much better job of interaction design than they could without that knowledge. They will also be better prepared to work with HCI and website development experts in an industrial team setting.

Topics Covered

The order of presentation of the topics was given a great deal of thought, with revisions based on teaching experience. Details may be seen in the Table of Contents. Here is an overview:

  • The first eight chapters build a solid foundation of HCI concepts and practice as outlined in the ACM SIGCHI's Curricula for Human-Computer Interaction. Topics include human perception, user and task analysis, content organization, visual organization, navigation, prototyping, and evaluation.
  • The next six chapters are devoted to issues specific to website development: color, typography, multimedia, accessibility, globalization, and trust.
  • A generous appendix presents an expository introduction to XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets. All formatting, after a first few examples, is done with Cascading Style Sheets, which has numerous advantages that are explained in the text.
Support for Instructors

The many review questions and exercises are a major feature of the book. The review questions help a student master the principles. But, as with sports, playing a musical instrument, or software engineering, a student learns to apply HCI principles to website development by doing it. You can't learn to swim simply by listening to lectures, and you can't learn user-centered development that way either. The way to learn is to take an assigned design task, carry it through, then compare one's work with that of other students under the guidance of the instructor. A model solution can be most helpful if presented after the students have tried to do it on their own.

This raises the always challenging issue of how an instructor should grade this type of project, especially if the instructor has limited experience in teaching the subject. Our response is an extensive Instructor's Manual. It contains suggestions for applications, ranging from short assignments to term-long projects, plus model solutions in the form of some of the best student work we have encountered in our teaching. The Instructor's Manual also contains tips for teaching and grading, sample syllabi, and sample exams.

The book has a companion website at http://www.prenhall.com/mccracken_wolfe. It contains links to illustrations in the text, URLs for simplicity in following links in the text, and other materials. A password-protected site contains the Instructors Manual and a set of PowerPoint slides for each chapter.

The bibliography for each chapter lists all literature cited in the text. These sources are both industrial and academic. Citations of relevant sources accompany design rules and guidelines as they appear in the text.

Classroom Tested

To practice what we preach, the book and supporting materials have been thoroughly use tested. Over a period of 18 months, several drafts of this book have been test-taught to approximately 1000 students at eight colleges and universities. Feedback from students and instructors has been instrumental in shaping the topic coverage and pedagogical strategy.

How to Use This Book

This organization permits great flexibility in how a course based on the text is structured. A prerequisite knowledge of Web-page authoring can be assumed or not. A prepublication version of this book has been taught successfully, using Web examples, both to students having no background in website development and to students who have extensive Web development experience.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Human-Computer Interaction: An Overview.

2. Capabilities of Human Beings.

3. Know Thy User.

4. Content Organization.

5. Visual Organization.

6. Navigation.

7. Prototyping.

8. Evaluation.

9. Color.

10. Typography.

11. Multimedia.

12. Accessibility.

13. Globalization and Future Trends.

14. Personalization and Trust.

Appendix: XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

This text combines an introduction to human-computer interaction (HCI) with an exposition of website development.

No one today needs convincing that the World Wide Web is a major phenomenon. Students are surely convinced, and they desire instruction in developing websites, but they usually see the subject in terms of writing HTML and of associated implementation tools. They often undervalue what the established field of HCI has to contribute to a good website.

This book is intended for such a student and for anyone else who wants to build effective interfaces between people and computers.

Goal

The goal of any course based on the book is to enable students to develop interfaces that are usable: they permit the user to find what he or she wants, find it quickly, and carry out any interaction effectively and efficiently. This goal has much broader applicability than the World Wide Web, of course. But with the Web being pervasive and of much interest to students, we chose to build our presentation around the Web.

Most of today's software is interactive, and most of our graduates will be called upon to write front ends or other interactive software as part of their jobs. People who have mastered the material in this book will be able to do a much better job of interaction design than they could without that knowledge. They will also be better prepared to work with HCI and website development experts in an industrial team setting.

Topics Covered

The order of presentation of the topics was given a great deal of thought, with revisions based on teaching experience. Details may be seen in the Table of Contents. Here is an overview:

  • The first eight chapters build a solid foundation of HCI concepts and practice as outlined in the ACM SIGCHI's Curricula for Human-Computer Interaction. Topics include human perception, user and task analysis, content organization, visual organization, navigation, prototyping, and evaluation.
  • The next six chapters are devoted to issues specific to website development: color, typography, multimedia, accessibility, globalization, and trust.
  • A generous appendix presents an expository introduction to XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets. All formatting, after a first few examples, is done with Cascading Style Sheets, which has numerous advantages that are explained in the text.

Support for Instructors

The many review questions and exercises are a major feature of the book. The review questions help a student master the principles. But, as with sports, playing a musical instrument, or software engineering, a student learns to apply HCI principles to website development by doing it. You can't learn to swim simply by listening to lectures, and you can't learn user-centered development that way either. The way to learn is to take an assigned design task, carry it through, then compare one's work with that of other students under the guidance of the instructor. A model solution can be most helpful if presented after the students have tried to do it on their own.

This raises the always challenging issue of how an instructor should grade this type of project, especially if the instructor has limited experience in teaching the subject. Our response is an extensive Instructor's Manual. It contains suggestions for applications, ranging from short assignments to term-long projects, plus model solutions in the form of some of the best student work we have encountered in our teaching. The Instructor's Manual also contains tips for teaching and grading, sample syllabi, and sample exams.

The book has a companion website at http://www.prenhall.com/mccracken_wolfe . It contains links to illustrations in the text, URLs for simplicity in following links in the text, and other materials. A password-protected site contains the Instructors Manual and a set of PowerPoint slides for each chapter.

The bibliography for each chapter lists all literature cited in the text. These sources are both industrial and academic. Citations of relevant sources accompany design rules and guidelines as they appear in the text.

Classroom Tested

To practice what we preach, the book and supporting materials have been thoroughly use tested. Over a period of 18 months, several drafts of this book have been test-taught to approximately 1000 students at eight colleges and universities. Feedback from students and instructors has been instrumental in shaping the topic coverage and pedagogical strategy.

How to Use This Book

This organization permits great flexibility in how a course based on the text is structured. A prerequisite knowledge of Web-page authoring can be assumed or not. A prepublication version of this book has been taught successfully, using Web examples, both to students having no background in website development and to students who have extensive Web development experience.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2003

    To the Rescue

    This book was a lifesaver--or at least a job-saver. With limited knowledge of internet technology and no background at all in design or commercial art, I had to construct from scratch a site for the department in which I work, at very short notice. 'User-Centered Website Development' got straight to the point, giving me the information I needed to produce a site that looked decent and--more important--lets the users get the information they need, easily and quickly. McCracken and Wolfe's philosophy for websites is, skip the bells and whistles and think about what the people using the site really need--and that's how they designed their book, too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)