Using CSH & Tcsh

Overview

If you use UNIX, you probably use csh to type commands even if you've never heard of it. It's the standard shell (command line) on most UNIX systems. tcsh is an enhanced version that's freely available and highly recommended.

Using csh & tcsh describes from the beginning how to use these shells interactively. More important, it shows how to get your work done faster with less typing. Even if you've used ...

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Using csh & tcsh

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Overview

If you use UNIX, you probably use csh to type commands even if you've never heard of it. It's the standard shell (command line) on most UNIX systems. tcsh is an enhanced version that's freely available and highly recommended.

Using csh & tcsh describes from the beginning how to use these shells interactively. More important, it shows how to get your work done faster with less typing. Even if you've used UNIX for years, techniques described in this book can make you more efficient.

You'll learn how to:

  • Make your prompt tell you where you are (no more pwd)
  • Use what you've typed before (history)
  • Type long command lines with very few keystrokes (command and filename completion)
  • Remind yourself of filenames when in the middle of typing a command
  • Edit a botched command instead of retyping it

This book does not cover programming or script writing in csh or
tcsh because the tasks are better done with a different shell, such as sh (the Bourne shell) or a language like Perl.


The csh and tcsh shells are repeatedly used whey typing UNIX commands. This spiffy efficiency guide shows you how to do more with less! New habits will let you type less with techniques like reusing previously typed phrases, using aliases, ways to abbreviate file names, special characters, command substitution, etc. Appendix shows you how to get tsch 6.06 via ftp, and how to install and build tsch. There is also a quick ref for csh and tsch.

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Editorial Reviews

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Fatbrain Review

The csh and tcsh shells are repeatedly used whey typing UNIX commands. This spiffy efficiency guide shows you how to do more with less! New habits will let you type less with techniques like reusing previously typed phrases, using aliases, ways to abbreviate file names, special characters, command substitution, etc. Appendix shows you how to get tsch 6.06 via ftp, and how to install and build tsch. There is also a quick ref for csh and tsch.
Booknews
Helps readers use the UNIX standard shell, or command interpreter, by demonstrating techniques to improve efficiency by using the shells interactively at the command line, rather than writing shell scripts. Includes a basic introduction to the C shell, details tsch's special features, and includes sections on filename and programmed completion, using commands to generate arguments, navigating the file system, and job control. Appendices offer instructions on obtaining and installing tcsh, and list electronic sources of more information. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565921320
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/8/1995
  • Series: Nutshell Handbooks Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 244
  • Sales rank: 1,345,487
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.19 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

is one of the primary contributors to the MySQL Reference Manual, a renowned online manual that has supported MySQL administrators and database developers for years, now available in an attractive paper format from the O'Reilly Community Press. He is also the author of Using csh & tcsh and Software Portability with imake by O'Reilly, as well as MySQL and MySQL and Perl for the Web by New Riders.

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Table of Contents

Preface;
Intended Audience;
Scope of This Handbook;
How To Read This Handbook;
Conventions Used in This Handbook;
Comments and Corrections;
Acknowledgments;
Part I: Learning the Basics;
Chapter 1: Introduction;
1.1 Using the Examples;
1.2 Selecting a Login Shell;
1.3 Before You Read Further;
Chapter 2: A Shell Primer;
2.1 Entering Commands;
2.2 Command Input and Output;
2.3 Files and Directories;
2.4 Combining Commands;
2.5 Running Commands in the Background;
2.6 When Do Spaces Matter?;
2.7 The Shell Startup Files;
Chapter 3: Using the Shell Effectively;
3.1 Using Filenames;
3.2 Reusing and Editing Commands;
3.3 Creating Command Shortcuts;
3.4 Using Command Substitution;
3.5 Navigating the File System;
3.6 Using Your Prompt;
3.7 Using Job Control;
Part II: Becoming More Efficient;
Chapter 4: The Shell Startup Files;
4.1 Startup and Shutdown Files;
4.2 Getting To Know .cshrc and .login;
4.3 Modifying .cshrc and .login;
4.4 Using Variables;
4.5 Organizing Your Startup Files;
4.6 The .logout File;
Chapter 5: Setting Up Your Terminal;
5.1 Identifying Your Terminal Settings;
5.2 What the Settings Mean;
5.3 Changing Your Terminal Settings;
5.4 Did Your Terminal Stop Working?;
Chapter 6: Using Your Command History;
6.1 The History List;
6.2 Reviewing Your History;
6.3 Using Commands from Your History;
6.4 Event Specifiers;
6.5 Word Designators;
6.6 Event Modifiers;
6.7 Making History Persist Across Login Sessions;
Chapter 7: The tcsh Command-Line Editor;
7.1 Editing a Command;
7.2 Command Key Bindings;
7.3 emacs Editing Mode;
7.4 vi Editing Mode;
7.5 Examining and Modifying Key Bindings;
Chapter 8: Using Aliases To Create Command Shortcuts;
8.1 Defining Aliases;
8.2 Uses for Aliases;
8.3 Using Sets of Aliases;
Chapter 9: File-Naming Shortcuts;
9.1 Using Filename Patterns;
9.2 Using {} To Generate Arguments;
9.3 Directory Naming Shorthand;
Chapter 10: Filename and Programmed Completion;
10.1 Using Built-In Filename Completion;
10.2 Programmed Completions;
10.3 Syntax of the complete Command;
10.4 Displaying and Removing Programmed Completions;
10.5 When Programmed Completions Do Not Apply;
Chapter 11: Quoting and Special Characters;
11.1 Special Characters;
11.2 The Shell's Quote Characters;
11.3 Referring to Files with Problematic Names;
11.4 Passing Special Characters to Commands;
11.5 Using Partial Quoting;
11.6 Quoting Oddities;
Chapter 12: Using Commands To Generate Arguments;
12.1 Command Substitution;
12.2 Repeating Substituted Commands;
12.3 Deferred Command Substitution;
12.4 When To Avoid Command Substitution;
Chapter 13: Navigating the File System;
13.1 Moving Around;
13.2 Working in Multiple Locations;
13.3 Letting the Shell Find Directories for You;
13.4 Using Aliases and Variables To Move Around;
Chapter 14: Keeping Track of Where You Are;
14.1 Types of Location Reporting;
14.2 Displaying Your Location in the Prompt;
14.3 Display Your Location in the Window Title;
14.4 Putting It All Together;
14.5 Displaying Other Types of Information;
Chapter 15: Job Control;
15.1 Job States;
15.2 Obtaining Job Information;
15.3 Changing a Job's State;
15.4 Other Applications of Job Control;
15.5 Job Control and Window Systems;
Part III: Appendixes;
Obtaining and Installing tcsh;
Obtaining the Source Distribution;
Build the Distribution—Quick Instructions;
Build the Distribution—Detailed Instructions;
Testing and Installing tcsh;
Allowing tcsh To Be a Log in Shell;
csh and tcsh Quick Reference;
Command Structure;
Star tup and Shutdown Files;
Variables;
Special Characters;
Command History;
Moving Around the File System;
Aliases;
Filename Completion;
Programmed Completion;
Job Control;
Command Editing in tcsh;
Other Sources of Information;
Documents;
Newsgroups;
Mailing Lists;
Colophon;

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