Utilitarianism [NOOK Book]

Overview

John Stuart Mill's book Utilitarianism is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism in ethics. The essay first appeared as a series of three articles published in Fraser's Magazine in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. It went through four editions during Mill's lifetime with minor additions and revisions.

Although Mill includes discussions of utilitarian ethical principles in other works such as On ...
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Utilitarianism

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Overview

John Stuart Mill's book Utilitarianism is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism in ethics. The essay first appeared as a series of three articles published in Fraser's Magazine in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. It went through four editions during Mill's lifetime with minor additions and revisions.

Although Mill includes discussions of utilitarian ethical principles in other works such as On Liberty and The Subjection of Women, Utilitarianism contains Mill's only major discussion of the fundamental grounds for utilitarian ethical theory.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014260527
  • Publisher: Philtre Libre
  • Publication date: 3/19/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 63 KB

Meet the Author

John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873) was a British philosopher, political economist and civil servant. He was also an influential contributor to social theory, political theory, and political economy. He has been called "the most influential English-speaking philosopher of the nineteenth century" Mill's conception of liberty justified the freedom of the individual in opposition to unlimited state control. He was a proponent of utilitarianism, an ethical theory developed by Jeremy Bentham. Hoping to remedy the problems found in an inductive approach to science, such as confirmation bias, he clearly set forth the premises of falsification as the key component in the scientific method. Mill was also a Member of Parliament and an important figure in liberal political philosophy.
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 13 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Rational.

    Quite simply put, Utilitarianism looks at ethics from an objective, rational standpoint. It ounlines the goal of morality, then shows how its principle best achieves that goal. Brilliant.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2006

    A fine essay

    I particularly enjoy the speech that Mill gave in 1868 on capital punishment. He explains why we should allow capital punishment to be use in cases of where the crime has resulted in a life being taken as oppose to the cases where the crime is against personal property. But to confine an individual to a life sentence and have that individual go through life with the possible guilt of the crime that he has just commited is more inhuman than a quick death. As far as his statement on Utilitarianism (borrowed from Jeremy Bentham) goes, he covers almost every type of critcism that will come this way of that belief. Just like Socrates, Mill considers the intellectual pleasures far more enjoyable (and meaningful) than those that take the physical form. A must read for all those that concern themselves with trying to attain a state of happiness.

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