Utilitarianism

Utilitarianism

3.7 9
by John Mill
     
 

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In this work of moral philosophy, John Stuart Mill defends the view that all human action should produce the greatest happiness overall, and that happiness itself is to be understood as consisting in higher and lower pleasures.

Overview

In this work of moral philosophy, John Stuart Mill defends the view that all human action should produce the greatest happiness overall, and that happiness itself is to be understood as consisting in higher and lower pleasures.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
<:st>A major contribution in the history of ethics, Mill's brief treatise on utilitarianism lays the theoretical foundation for this branch of philosophy and outlines its relationship to other ethical systems, the arguments in its favor, and its implications for concerns about justice. The appendix contains the text of Mill's 1868 speech on capital punishment. A introductory chapter describes Mill's place in the history of philosophy and his contribution to the study of ethics. Cited in There is no index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781475146233
Publisher:
CreateSpace
Publication date:
04/24/2012
Pages:
50
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.12(d)

Meet the Author

Colin Heydt is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of South Florida. He is the author of Rethinking Mill's Ethics: Character and Aesthetic Education (Continuum, 2006).

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Utilitarianism (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I particularly enjoy the speech that Mill gave in 1868 on capital punishment. He explains why we should allow capital punishment to be use in cases of where the crime has resulted in a life being taken as oppose to the cases where the crime is against personal property. But to confine an individual to a life sentence and have that individual go through life with the possible guilt of the crime that he has just commited is more inhuman than a quick death. As far as his statement on Utilitarianism (borrowed from Jeremy Bentham) goes, he covers almost every type of critcism that will come this way of that belief. Just like Socrates, Mill considers the intellectual pleasures far more enjoyable (and meaningful) than those that take the physical form. A must read for all those that concern themselves with trying to attain a state of happiness.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Alot of the text was distorted, and i find mill's theory to be flawed.
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