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¡Vámonos! Let's Go!
     

¡Vámonos! Let's Go!

by Joe Cepeda (Illustrator)
 

You may know that the wheels on the bus go round and round, but did you know that las ruedas del bus ruedan y ruedan? Or that while the horn on the truck goes honk, honk, honk, la bocina del camión goes tut tuu tuu? “The Wheels on the Bus” takes on a new, bilingual identity as children sing in both English and Spanish about the

Overview

You may know that the wheels on the bus go round and round, but did you know that las ruedas del bus ruedan y ruedan? Or that while the horn on the truck goes honk, honk, honk, la bocina del camión goes tut tuu tuu? “The Wheels on the Bus” takes on a new, bilingual identity as children sing in both English and Spanish about the exciting noises made by all sorts of vehicles ranging from a motorcycle, to an ambulance, to a fire truck. The best sounds of all are the ones from the children. Yay and Yupi! Sheet music included.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
08/17/2015
In this bilingual adaptation of “The Wheels on the Bus,” multicultural children en route to a park encounter other vehicles that include a train engine, motorcycle, and ambulance. As in the original song, sound effects play a big role, but Laínez moves the focus from the bus to the surrounding vehicles: “The alarm on the fire truck goes woo-ooo-ooo, woo-ooo-ooo, woo-ooo-ooo.” (In Spanish, the same line becomes a touch unwieldy, though no less fun: “La alarma del camion hace uuuah uuuah uuuah, uuuah uuuah uuuah, uuuah uuuah uuuah.”) Cepeda’s characteristically upbeat oil and acrylic paintings have a smudged appearance, as though it might still feel tacky to the touch. A cheery singalong, in both languages. Ages 3–6. Author’s agent: Stefanie Von Borstel, Full Circle Literary. Illustrator’s agent: Jennifer Rofé, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Erika Clark
Look! Here comes the yellow school bus bouncing up the steep hill. Before the driver picks up two ecstatic pupils ready to embark on another day at school, he sends a jolly good morning greeting to a neighbor on his routine stroll around the block with his dog. On the way to school, the children on the bus relay a hello to the train conductor on a speedy train that choo choos by, a motorcycle that vroom vroom passes, and an airplane that zoom zooms high through the cotton-like lavender skies. But watch out yellow school bus! Here comes an ambulance and fire truck. On their way to save lives, the siren on the ambulance nee naws loud and the alarm on the fire truck strongly wooo-ooo-ooos to caution the yellow bus and others who are sharing the road. This great bilingual take on the children’s classic “The Wheels on the Bus” will excite and bring the entire family together. With a combination of music and common onomatopoeias, this book will also serve a purpose in any grade school classroom and particularly, classes that support literacy second language acquisition, and bilingual education. Teachers and parents can first build the students’ vocabulary in English and Spanish using the glossary provided in the back of the book. Then children could strengthen vocabulary in English or Spanish by referring to the song “The Wheels on the Bus,” which the author also provides in the back of the book. This story has potential to be used in diverse curriculum, such as music literacy, cartooning, modes of transportation in ESL/ bilingual education, and literary elements in English Language Arts. Reviewer: Erika Clark; Ages 5 to 8.
Kirkus Reviews
2015-05-06
This bilingual spinoff of "The Wheels on the Bus" features many of the vehicles associated with community helpers. In addition to the titular (school) bus, readers are introduced to the Spanish-language names for "ambulance," "fire truck," "train," and so on. It works pretty well in English: "The alarm on the fire truck goes woo-ooo-ooo," etc. Unfortunately, the nearly total lack of meter in the Spanish verses makes them awkward to sing: "La alarma del camión de bomberos hace uuuah uuuah uuuah." A superfluous bus screech at the beginning and end also detracts from the song's rhythm. A suspension of disbelief is necessary when the driver drops the children off not at school or even back at their homes, where they were first picked up, but at the park—where the children play at driving the vehicles they have just seen at a carnival. Except for substituting "all through the park" for "all through the town" in the recapitulation of verses near the end, the transition from school-bus ride to carnival rides is too abrupt. The story continues for four additional pages with the song all but forgotten as the children run to buy ice cream. Cepeda's lively and familiar illustrations are the highlights in this multicultural neighborhood excursion. A musical score and nonphonetic glossary are included. Though the book is unquestionably well-meaning, it just doesn't work except as a vocabulary builder. (Bilingual picture book. 3-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823434428
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
07/30/2015
Edition description:
Bilingual
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,338,455
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Joe Cepeda is the illustrator of many vibrant and popular picture books, including The Journey of Oliver K. Woodman by Darcy Pattison and Cub's Big World by Sarah L. Thomson. He lives in Southern California. www.joecepeda.com

René Colato Laínez is the author of many bilingual and multicultural children’s books including Señor Pancho Had a Rancho. He lives in Arleta, California.

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