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Vale of Tears: Revisiting the Canudos Massacre in Northeastern Brazil, 1893-1897 / Edition 1
     

Vale of Tears: Revisiting the Canudos Massacre in Northeastern Brazil, 1893-1897 / Edition 1

by Robert M. Levine
 

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ISBN-10: 0520203437

ISBN-13: 2900520203432

Pub. Date: 12/26/1995

Publisher: University of California Press

The massacre of Canudos In 1897 is a pivotal episode in Brazilian social history. Looking at the event through the eyes of the inhabitants, Levine challenges traditional interpretations and gives weight to the fact that most of the Canudenses were of mixed-raced descent and were thus perceived as opponents to progress and civilization. In 1897 Brazilian military

Overview

The massacre of Canudos In 1897 is a pivotal episode in Brazilian social history. Looking at the event through the eyes of the inhabitants, Levine challenges traditional interpretations and gives weight to the fact that most of the Canudenses were of mixed-raced descent and were thus perceived as opponents to progress and civilization. In 1897 Brazilian military forces destroyed the millenarian settlement of Canudos, murdering as many as 35,000 pious rural folk who had taken refuge in the remote northeast backlands of Brazil. Fictionalized in Mario Vargas Llosa's acclaimed novel, War at the of the World, Canudos is a pivotal episode in Brazilian social history. When looked at through the eyes of the inhabitants of Canudos, however, this historical incident ls itself to a bold new interpretation which challenges the traditional polemics on the subject. While the Canudos movement has been consistently viewed either as a rebellion of crazed fanatics or as a model of proletarian resistance to oppression, Levine deftly demonstrates that it was, in fact, neither. Vale of Tears probes the reasons for the Brazilian ambivalence toward its social history, giving much weight to the fact that most of the Canudenses were of mixed-race descent. They were perceived as opponents to progress and civilization and, by inference, to Brazil's attempts to "whiten" itself. As a result there are major insights to be found here into Brazilians' self-image over the past century.

Author Biography: Robert M. Levine is Professor of History and Director of Latin American Studies at the University of Miami. He is author of numerous books on Brazil and Latin America.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900520203432
Publisher:
University of California Press
Publication date:
12/26/1995
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
365

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