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Valis
     

Valis

4.1 32
by Philip K. Dick, Tom Weiner
 

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Valis is the first book in Philip K. Dick's incomparable final trio of novels (the others being are The Divine Invasion and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer). This disorienting and bleakly funny work is about a schizophrenic hero named Horselover Fat; the hidden mysteries of Gnostic Christianity; and reality as revealed through a pink laser.

Overview

Valis is the first book in Philip K. Dick's incomparable final trio of novels (the others being are The Divine Invasion and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer). This disorienting and bleakly funny work is about a schizophrenic hero named Horselover Fat; the hidden mysteries of Gnostic Christianity; and reality as revealed through a pink laser. Valis is a theological detective story, in which God is both a missing person and the perpetrator of the ultimate crime.

"The fact that what Dick is entertaining us about is reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation—this has escaped most critics. Nobody notices that we have our own homegrown Borges, and have had him for thirty years."—Ursula K. Le Guin, New Republic

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The quest for God is the binding theme of this trilogy. The ``funny and painful and sometimes brilliant'' VALIS(anagram) finds protagonist and Dick alter-ego Horselover Fat unable to reconcile human suffering with his belief in God. Invasion is a ``fascinating and highly readable'' vision of Armageddon, blending New Testament, Kabbalah and Dick's own worldview. In Transmigration , Angel Archer reminisces about her father-in-law, Timothy, an Episcopal bishop obsessed with a set of ancient scrolls that shed faith-threatening new light on Jesus: ``This finely crafted, odd but compelling book demonstrates Dick's great erudition, keen human insight and subtle ironic sense of humor,'' said PW. (July)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781433253782
Publisher:
Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2008
Edition description:
Unabridged
Pages:
7
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 6.30(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

One of the greatest authors of the 20th century, with a career spanning 3 decades and 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film; notably: Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. Dick won the Hugo Award in 1963 and was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 he was the first science fiction to be published by the Library of America.

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Valis 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the only book that I've ever read that has the air of 'The Matrix,' which is a great movie. If you question reality and what we call 'God' itself, read this book, and you'll literally be 'enlightened', but not in some hokey spiritual way. I'd recommend this to anyone who has ever thought, 'Who are we? What are we? From where did we come?' An excellent novel.
Buer_Douglas More than 1 year ago
It took me a while to get into this book, but once I did I couldn't put it down. A really unique look at God and insanity and how the two intersect. I will definitely be reading it again in the near future.
trhummer More than 1 year ago
This is one of those fascinating bad books (like Melville's "Pierre") that one is at a loss to explain: not in terms of its subject or style, but more in terms of its existing at all. If anyone other than Philip K. Dick had written this. . . but no one else could possibly have written it. Soggily plotted, executed with all the attention to craft that Tom Sawyer gave the fence he was whitewashing, "Valis" nonetheless exerts a gravitational pull; I can imagine that for some people (Dick included) it is a gravity well. Part of what holds the reader is the knowledge, which the novel insists on and reminds us of, that certain ingredients of this story are autobiographical. The pink laser, the delivery girl with the fish pendant, an autodidact's brew of Gnosticism and information theory: these things all were part of Dick's personal narrative. All in all, reading this book is like watching a wreck go down on the Rube Goldberg Highway to Dysfunctional Heaven.
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