Overview

It is a platitude that most people, as they say, 'work to live' rather than 'live to work.' And in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, work weeks have expanded and the divide between work time and personal time has significantly blurred due to innovations in such things as electronic communications. Concerns over the value of work in our lives, as well as with the balance or use of time between work and leisure, confront most people in contemporary society. Discussions over the values of time, ...
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The Value of Time and Leisure in a World of Work

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Overview

It is a platitude that most people, as they say, 'work to live' rather than 'live to work.' And in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, work weeks have expanded and the divide between work time and personal time has significantly blurred due to innovations in such things as electronic communications. Concerns over the value of work in our lives, as well as with the balance or use of time between work and leisure, confront most people in contemporary society. Discussions over the values of time, leisure, and work are directly related to the time-honored question of what makes a life good. And this question is of particular interest to philosophers, especially ethicists. In this volume, leading scholars address a range of value considerations related to peoples' thoughts and practices around time utilization, leisure, and work with masterful insight. In addressing various practical issues, these scholars demonstrate the timeless relevance and practical import of Philosophy to human lived experience.
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Editorial Reviews

Andy Gustafson
The writers of these essays are top-notch, the variety of angles taken is useful, and the applications are very relevant to contemporary business. The essays in this book not only help us to think through the issues of work and leisure, but they help us see how philosophers throughout the ages have provided insight to this issue.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739141427
  • Publisher: Lexington Books
  • Publication date: 3/16/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 178
  • File size: 296 KB

Meet the Author

Mitchell R. Haney is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of North Florida. A. David Kline is professor of philosophy at the University of North Florida and director of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida Center for Ethics, Public Policy and the Professions. He is co-editor of Introductory Readings in The Philosophy of Science, Philosophy: The Basic Issues, and Agricultural Bioethics.
Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics and Chair of the Department of Management in the School of Business Administration at Loyola University Chicago. He is also the cofounder and long time Associate Editor of Business Ethics Quarterly, the journal of the Society for Business Ethics. For over twenty-three years he has been the Resident Philosopher on National Public Radio’s Chicago affiliate, WBEZ-FM, and he regularly lectures to community and professional organizations on issues of business and ethics. His books include: My Job My Self: Work and the Creation of the Modern Individual (Routledge, 2000); The Importance of Being Lazy: In Praise of Play, Leisure and Vacations (Routledge, 2003); Why It’s Hard to Be Good (Routledge, 2006); and, most recently, he helped to edit and wrote the prologues for The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler (The Great Books Foundation, 2007) and Even Deadlier: A Sequel (The Great Books Foundation, 2009).
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
Part 2 Part I. Theoretical Considerations of Time, Balance, Work, and Leisure
Chapter 3 Chapter 1. Balancing Work and Leisure
Chapter 4 Chapter 2. Phenomenological Reflections on Work and Leisure in America
Chapter 5 Chapter 3. The Question of Philosophical Leisure: A Philosophy of Communication
Part 6 Part II. Theory Meets Practice in the World of Work and Leisure
Chapter 7 Chapter 4. Yes We Can Live Reasonably Well and Decently in an Imperfect World (Or How Work and Leisure Contribute to a Flourishing Life)
Chapter 8 Chapter 5. Corporate Culture and Quality of Life: The Virtues of Industry and the Rewards of Leisure
Chapter 9 Chapter 6. Worthwhile Living in Second Life
Part 10 Part III. Reflective Practices
Chapter 11 Chapter 7. Wisdom and Work
Chapter 12 Chapter 8. The Effects of Work on Moral Decision-Making
Chapter 13 Chapter 9. The Value of Slow
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