Vampire Pond

Vampire Pond

4.0 1
by Peter Joseph Swanson
     
 
In medieval England a gypsy witch and her dwarf brother help a small village fight a primitive vampire that lives in a nearby pond. And magic is used for malice. The gypsy witch finds she has to battle a prosperous member of the village, a comely bad witch who makes the town's coffins and shoes, as she seduces as many of the menfolk as she can. All the while the

Overview

In medieval England a gypsy witch and her dwarf brother help a small village fight a primitive vampire that lives in a nearby pond. And magic is used for malice. The gypsy witch finds she has to battle a prosperous member of the village, a comely bad witch who makes the town's coffins and shoes, as she seduces as many of the menfolk as she can. All the while the cursed abbey and mill dam threaten to collapse; a green man ghost chases a green martyr monk into town from Ireland; druid visions begin to instruct the gypsy witch so old legends reenact pre-Celtic history; and the true Goddess appears to assure everyone She understands both sides of the fray.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781494938062
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
01/08/2014
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.51(d)

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Vampire Pond 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
Great dialog mixing horror humor and the hex of history Driven by dialog with the author’s trademark dark humor, and set in the mud and murk of England in the early days of Christianity, Peter Joseph Swanson’s Vampire Pond blends myth and legend from Greek gods to Celts and Druids to Noah’s Ark. The gypsy widow and her dwarfish brother are marooned in the misery of a village not yet on any maps and find themselves drawn into poverty faith and politics. There’s even a touch of modern ecology as villagers wonder if the cutting down of trees might have caused the mud to prevail and crops to fail. “God gave us trees so they are to be used,” says one protagonist. “Now it’s all barren.” The author’s excellent feeling for history is clear in his language and characters, from “tart” being short for “sweetheart” to barber surgeons who just might want to burn witches in order to take over the doctoring trade. Hilarious misunderstandings of familiar Bible tales have people arguing over whether God would really have drowned rabbits and small children. And the greed of someone who may or may be sent by the church leads to complex machinations over whether or not it’s murder to send someone to a monster. This story really takes off halfway through when veiled references to evil and mystery suddenly come to life and horrors abound, all with that trademark mix of the ludicrous and the haunting. The characters have a pleasing consistency, their responses and their timing perfect, giving the reader the same sense of shock and surprise as they endure. A story as slippery, dark and muddy as the world it portrays, this tale builds nicely on humor balanced like tumble-down buildings sinking in the mire, and offers escape or redemption at the hands of a very practical woman and her brother. Disclosure: I was lucky enough to find a copy of this novel when it was offered free.