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The Vanderbilts
     

The Vanderbilts

5.0 1
by Jerry E. Patterson, Ray Childs (Read by)
 

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In The Vanderbilts the family's astounding story is told in full: from the farmstead beginnings of the Commodore on Staten Island to the pinnacle of wealth, fame, and social standing achieved by the legendary Vanderbilt ladies: Consuelo, Alva, Grace, Gertrude, and Gloria. The text traces the commercial machinations that established their fortune and the

Overview

In The Vanderbilts the family's astounding story is told in full: from the farmstead beginnings of the Commodore on Staten Island to the pinnacle of wealth, fame, and social standing achieved by the legendary Vanderbilt ladies: Consuelo, Alva, Grace, Gertrude, and Gloria. The text traces the commercial machinations that established their fortune and the Vanderbilt mania for house building that engaged some of America's finest designers and architects.

More than 200 pictures reveal the striking personalities of this extraordinary family and the glittering interiors in which they led their fabled lives. Their art treasures are beautifully reproduced in color; and pictured, too, are many of the press photos that kept the Vanderbilts in the public eye. Genealogical charts and a map showing the "Vanderbilt Country" of old New York are included as well. All in all, it is an epic story, clearly chronicled and dazzlingly portrayed.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Those fond of the smell of money will adore this book, crammed with photographs of Persian rugs, crystal chandeliers, a never-ending train of evening dress and sprawling grounds of New England castles. In chronicling the rise of the Vanderbilts, Patterson ( Living It Up ) traces the ever-interesting story of American-style getting and spending. As devotees of Edith Wharton--and others practiced at distinguishing ``old'' from merely ``big'' money--may be surprised to learn, the first ``van der Bilt'' of record was a resident, ca. 1650, in Flatbush, N.Y. The family never had much money until, in the 19th century, Cornelius parlayed a $100 investment into America's greatest fortune. Railroads entered Vanderbilt holdings relatively late: Cornelius, the man whose statue scowls over Manhattan's Grand Central Station, had no use for the locomotive until, in his old age, a son showed him he could turn a profit with railroads. (Nov.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
America's ``most social'' family figures highly in a number of recent publications, including Arthur T. Vanderbilt's Fortune's Children ( LJ 7/89) and Robert B. King's The Vanderbilt Homes ( LJ 9/15/89). Definitely aimed at a popular audience, this volume covers the family's humble origins on Staten Island, ``Commodore'' Cornelius Vanderbilt's (1794-1877) accumulation of great wealth via ships and railroads, the social and artistic aspirations and accomplishments of succeeding generations, and the monuments integrally tied to the family, including Grand Central Station, The Breakers, Biltmore, and the old Metropolitan Opera House. This slightly spicy chronicle is illustrated by likenesses of notable family members and lush color photographs representing the family's taste in art, architecture, interior design, and jewelry. Handy aids include the genealogical charts that introduce all chapters and a map of Vanderbilt and related buildings in Manhattan. Fun, but very light, reading.-- Kathleen Eagen Johnson, Historic Hudson Valley, Tarrytown, N.Y.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781935430445
Publisher:
Audio Bookshelf
Publication date:
06/28/2010
Product dimensions:
6.58(w) x 6.62(h) x 1.02(d)
Age Range:
13 Years

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Vanderbilts 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In The Vanderbilts, Paterson sums up the decadant excess of America's Gilded Age, at the center of which lay the powerful Vanderbilt family. This is however, more than a tale of yachts and hundred room mansions but of the social rivalry, infighting and one-upsmanship that spelled the end of the fortune.