The Vanishing Newspaper [2nd Ed]: Saving Journalism in the Information Age [NOOK Book]

Overview

Five years ago in The Vanishing Newspaper, Philip Meyer offered the newspaper industry a business model for preserving and stabilizing the social responsibility functions of the press in a way that could outlast technology-driven changes in media forms. Now he has updated this groundbreaking volume, taking current declines in circulation and the number of dailies into consideration and offering a greater variety of ways to save journalism. Meyer’s “influence model” is based on the premise that a newspaper’s main ...
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The Vanishing Newspaper [2nd Ed]: Saving Journalism in the Information Age

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Overview

Five years ago in The Vanishing Newspaper, Philip Meyer offered the newspaper industry a business model for preserving and stabilizing the social responsibility functions of the press in a way that could outlast technology-driven changes in media forms. Now he has updated this groundbreaking volume, taking current declines in circulation and the number of dailies into consideration and offering a greater variety of ways to save journalism. Meyer’s “influence model” is based on the premise that a newspaper’s main product is not news or information, but influence: societal influence, which is not for sale, and commercial influence, which is. The model is supported by an abundance of empirical evidence, including statistical assessments of the quality and influence of the journalist’s product, as well as its effects on business success. Meyer now applies this empirical evidence to recent developments, such as the impact of Craigslist and current trends in information technologies. New charts show how a surge in newsroom employment propped up readership in the 1980s, and data on the effects of newsroom desegregation are now included. Meyer’s most controversial suggestion, making certification available for reporters and editors, has been gaining ground. This new edition discusses several examples of certificate programs that are emerging in organizations both old and new. Understanding the relationship between quality and profit probably will not save traditional newspapers, but Meyer argues that such knowledge can guide new media enterprises. He believes that we have the tools to sustain high-quality journalism and preserve its unique social functions, though in a transformed way.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A trend to appeal to niche audiences is rendering traditional newspapers obsolete. Despite this assertion, Meyer (journalism, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) devotes most of his book to proving that a traditional, socially responsible newspaper makes good business sense. Drawing on his own and others' research, he argues that there is a positive correlation between newspaper accuracy and reader trust. Even in a chapter that discusses creative responses to the challenges facing the news business, Meyer does not stray from the model of a traditional newspaper reaching out to general readers. He does concede that only the frontline reporters will remain part of the equation in whatever new forms journalism will take. The final chapter is a plea for journalists to develop and enforce professional standards. With the explosion of new media outlets, from satellite radio to web logs, it seems unlikely that the profession will have much luck policing itself. Journalism schools will survive for quite some time, however, and libraries that serve them should consider buying this book.-Susan M. Colowick, Timberland Regional Lib., Tumwater, WA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826272034
  • Publisher: University of Missouri Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 1,135,368
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Philip Meyer is Professor Emeritus of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author or editor of a number of books, including Assessing Public Journalism and Letters from the Editor: Lessons on Journalism and Life by William F. Woo (both available from the University of Missouri Press).
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Table of Contents

1 The influence model 4
2 How newspapers make money 34
3 How advertisers make decisions 47
4 Credibility and influence 65
5 Accuracy in reporting 83
6 Readability 109
7 Do editors matter? 124
8 The last line of defense 145
9 Capacity measures 159
10 How newspapers were captured by Wall Street 174
11 Saving journalism 201
12 What we can do 228
App Notes on data analysis 247
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