Vegas Sunrise

Vegas Sunrise

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by Fern Michaels
     
 

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A Powerful Legacy That Can Unite--Or Divide. . .

Fanny Thornton Reed, proud matriarch of the Thornton dynasty, chooses her first husband's illegitimate son Jeff to run Babylon, her family's successful Las Vegas casino. For Jeff, this is a chance of a lifetime. For Fanny, it is a decision she will come to regret as it turns her children against eachSee more details below

Overview

A Powerful Legacy That Can Unite--Or Divide. . .

Fanny Thornton Reed, proud matriarch of the Thornton dynasty, chooses her first husband's illegitimate son Jeff to run Babylon, her family's successful Las Vegas casino. For Jeff, this is a chance of a lifetime. For Fanny, it is a decision she will come to regret as it turns her children against each other. For the rightful Thornton heirs, it is their worst nightmare come true. Will jealousy and betrayal tear them apart once and for all--or will perseverance and love salvage the Thornton dream?

"Fascinating." --Romantic Times

"A jam-packed finale." --Kirkus Reviews

120,000 Words

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Who will run the Babylon casino? That's the millions-of-dollars question in the thin final volume in Michaels's Vegas trilogy. Fanny Coleman Thornton Reed, clan matriarch and widow of Babylon-builder Ash Thornton, thinks she has the matter in hand. Her son Sage despises the casino life; his twin, Birch, is in South America; daughter Sunny is incapacitated by multiple sclerosis while daughter Billie is running her own design business. So control will pass to Ash's illegitimate son, Jeff Lassiter, whom Fanny has embraced as family. Then Birch returns, unannounced, with his scheming new wife, Celia, and the jackpot spills trouble. The Thorntons may run the flashiest casino in Vegas, but they work like Calvinists, espouse family values and dress down. After three years in the jungles of Costa Rica with Birch, Celia wants some clothes, for heaven's sake, and she is instantly cast as the whore of Babylon. Alas, we do not really care who wins the day. The good guys are sanctimonious, the bad guys merely annoying. Out of the whole sprawling clan only Sunny is truly lovable, and she is reduced to a poster child for MS. As Michaels finds a man for Fanny, only Vegas addicts are likely to hang around for the payoff. (Oct.)
Library Journal
In the name of truth, journalists pursue every secret, invade every corner, and publish so that the public can know the simple facts and decide the truth for themselves. With this standard firmly in hand, a young reporter follows a distinguished senator who is making a presidential bid. Sharing an interest in Civil War history, the two connect as the campaign unfolds. Soon, though, a niggling inconsistency begins to prey on the reporter's mind. With his feelings complicated by the presence of an ex-lover working as an adviser to the candidate, the reporter teases out a distant fact whose truth is proved by a teenager with a face much like the candidate's own. In his first novel, Karaim delivers a story that is searingly realistic and exquisitely written. A Knight-Ridder journalist who has covered prominent candidates, Karaim reports with laconic veracity about the stress, excitement, and boredom of a campaign. Of the recent crop of Washington novels, this may well be the best. A sure bet for all public libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 1/99.]--Barbara Conaty, Library of Congress Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A bilious fictional examination of the perverse relationship between a presidential candidate too good to be true and a newspaper reporter whose insecurities and uncanny nose for news bring doom and gloom to the campaign trail. Much of this humorless, darkly solemn first novel is evidently based on personal experience: Karaim, a Washington journalist for the Miami-based Knight-Ridder newspaper chain, covered the 1992 Democratic campaign and revels in the cynicism, monotony, lost luggage, and stale odors that envelope a cadre of journalists whose job it is eat, drink, and merrily cling to the candidate's every word and gesture. Illinois Senator Thomas Hart "Saint Thomas" Crane is as good as they come: an intelligent, sincerely compassionate liberal Democrat who hasn't forgotten the despair of his lower-class, coal-town upbringing. Terminally brooding journalist Cliff O'Connell, suffers from career burnout (at age 33) and the untimely departure of his lover, Robin Winters, now a strategist in the Crane machine. Though the two meet for some passionate tumbles, Karaim avoids the pot-boiling, bed-hopping high jinks of current political romans à clef and instead contrasts Crane's dogged determination to be the hero the voting public wants with O'Connell's relentless attempt to find himself in the subject he's covering. When Crane tells voters that he never lies, the suspicious reporter pokes around the senator's Illinois hometown and discovers a secret that could ruin him. Despite a teary plea from Robin, O'Connell prints the truth, then masochistically stays with the campaign as public condemnation of Crane slowly simmers into an angry backlash at the news media for revealingan aspect of his character that may not have been so bad after all. Can the electorate, with its need to idolize, and the media, with its need to slay the celebrities it creates, ever grasp the truth about political leaders? Though he ducks the answer with an inevitable—and much too convenient—tragic end, Karaim deserves credit for asking. .

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781420137859
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
04/01/2009
Series:
Vegas , #3
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
23,238
File size:
1 MB

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