Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet: 250 Simple Recipes and Dozens of Healthy Menus for Eating Well Every Day [NOOK Book]

Overview

?Nava Atlas has solutions for maintaining sophisticated flavors in the dishes she creates and still manages to keep the ingredients healthy.? ?Cooking Light

Eating healthfully is a challenge for those with fast-paced lives. In The Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet, Nava Atlas pares meal preparation down to the essentials, using just a few high-quality ingredients in each delicious dish. Focusing on whole foods and fresh produce (with a little ...
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Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet: 250 Simple Recipes and Dozens of Healthy Menus for Eating Well Every Day

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Overview

“Nava Atlas has solutions for maintaining sophisticated flavors in the dishes she creates and still manages to keep the ingredients healthy.” —Cooking Light

Eating healthfully is a challenge for those with fast-paced lives. In The Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet, Nava Atlas pares meal preparation down to the essentials, using just a few high-quality ingredients in each delicious dish. Focusing on whole foods and fresh produce (with a little help from convenient natural sauces and condiments) she serves up a varied range of choices for everyday fare.
More than 250 recipes include soups, salads, and pastas; grain, bean, and soy entrees; wraps and sandwich fillings; simple side dishes; fruit-filled finales; and more. The full-flavored fare made from five ingredients or less includes Curried Red Lentil and Spinach Soup; Greek-Flavored Potato Salad; Black Bean Nachos Grandes; Baked Barbecue Tofu and Peppers; and Miniature Fresh Fruit Tarts. Filled with ingenious shortcuts and sprinkled with kitchen wisdom and tips throughout, The Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet also offers the reader dozens of menu suggestions to help make meal planning effortless.
From sophisticated (Mixed Greens with Pears, Cranberries, and Goat Cheese) to kid-friendly, (Peanut Butter Noodles), here are recipes to suit every taste. Nava Atlas makes it simple for busy families or active singles to eat the kind of high-nutrient foods everyone needs and to enjoy the robust flavors everyone craves.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Many of us follow an unintentional high-low plan for weekly cooking: high-quality, time-intensive meals on the weekends, and low-quality, quick cook meals during the week. With Nava Atlas's help, we might not dip so low in midweek.

This book, her sixth vegetarian cookbook, contains 250 stripped-down meatless recipes with only five ingredients (water, salt, and pepper don't "count") that, for the most part, can be made quickly. Atlas relies on whole foods, fresh produce, and quality convenience foods like pasta, canned beans, store-bought sauces, and pizza crust to make the trick work. So for example, Ricotta and Green Chili Rice only requires vegetable bouillon cubes, brown rice, a can of mild green chilies, ricotta cheese, and fresh cilantro or parsley. To put together an Easy Vegetable Lasagna, you'll need only lasagna, ricotta cheese, 3 cups of lightly steamed vegetables, mozzarella cheese, and a jar of pasta sauce. (Well, maybe those vegetables should count as more than one ingredient, but that's just quibbling: It sure beats most takeout.)

There are special sections for soups, streamlined salads, pastas, pizzas, grain dishes, wraps, plus side dishes and desserts. Many of the recipes also come with menu suggestions on how to round out a meal -- especially helpful for beginning vegetarians. Equally helpful are Atlas's suggestions for stocking your pantry and for weekly menu-planning and shopping. She argues that planning essentially three dinners will do it, as long as you cook in sufficient quantities to produce leftovers for three more nights. An additional benefit of these simple recipes, she says, is that young children are more apt to try new foods if they are not complicated. (Ginger Curwen)

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Vegetarian expert Atlas (Vegetariana and Vegetarian Express) offers a slew of simple, quick recipes, most of which make use of packaged and canned foods. A few unusual soups stand out, such as Rice, Lettuce, and Mushroom Broth, and Cold Curried Cucumber Soup made tangy with a dose of buttermilk. Salads include Chickpea Salad with Roasted Peppers, made with canned chickpeas and jarred red peppers, as well as a more upscale Warm Potato Salad with Goat Cheese. Some recipes, Pinto Beans and Corn, for instance, involve little more than warming up and stirring together the contents of various cans. Although this is not a vegan cookbook, many of its recipes do eschew butter; Ravioli or Tortellini with Sweet Potato Sauce calls for ricotta ravioli, but replaces butter or oil with nonhydrogenated margarine. Each recipe carries a suggested menu Atlas encourages readers to match Mixed Olives Pizza (made with a store-bought crust) with Corn Slaw and nutritional information. A chapter on wraps offers some nice alternatives to sandwiches, such as Eggplant Parmigiana Wraps. Desserts are fruit-based, such as Miniature Fresh Fruit Tarts made with packaged graham cracker pie shells, applesauce and yogurt. Many of Atlas's recipes are already familiar, but will be useful for beginning vegetarians, as well as for those who lead busy lives. 100 b&w illustrations. (June 19) Forecast: The Use-As-Few-Ingredients-as-Possible genre may be reaching saturation, so the title could backfire. On the other hand, Vegetariana sold more than 100,000 copies, and clearly huge numbers of health-conscious people are pressed for time, so this book stands a good chance of finding its niche. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Discovering via her web site that her earlier Vegetarian Express, a book of simple vegetarian recipes and menus, is particularly popular with her readers, Nava decided that a collection of recipes made from streamlined ingredients lists would be even more helpful for today's harried home cook. Some of the resulting recipes are fine, but others seem as if they would benefit greatly from another seasoning or two or one more ingredient to round them out. A number of them rely on convenience foods, such as Hearty Pasta and Pink Beans, made with just frozen ravioli, canned beans, jarred pasta sauce, and cheese. Lorna Sass's Short-Cut Vegetarian (LJ 9/1/97) takes a similar approach with more interesting results, but Atlas's Vegetariana has sold more than 100,000 copies. Expect demand. Sciences Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-Atlas writes for the cook in a time crunch, but this simplicity makes her book attractive and useful to novices as well. Illustrated with whimsical line drawings, the original and appealing recipes offer a variety of tastes-from potato salad and applesauce to more adventurous cold soups and frittatas. More sophisticated cooks will enjoy a variety of ideas derived from international cuisines, and YAs will be particularly interested in the recipes for popular foods such as pizzas, wraps, and smoothies. The five-ingredient constraint does result, at times, in unnecessary blandness; often, just another herb or two would make a big difference. But by paring recipes down to their most essential elements, Atlas creates an outstanding introduction to the basic principles of preparation and food combinations that underlie more complex cooking. As they stand, the recipes do work; they are easy to follow, and most call for readily available ingredients. Having mastered them, aspiring gourmets can become more creative, guided by sidebars that explain cooking arcana such as pasta shapes, mixed greens, or meat substitutes. Concise advice is offered concerning pantry stocking and menu planning, and the index is excellent. Many practical tips make this book a good resource for the growing number of people who, for environmental and nutritional reasons, are interested in using locally grown, seasonal produce as much as possible. You really don't have to be a strict vegetarian to love this book.-Christine C. Menefee, Fairfax County Public Library, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
Praise for The Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet:

“Here’s a way to ease into a more vegetarian diet. . . . Most of the recipes are quick and all are definitely easy. What more could you ask for on a busy weekday night?”—Philadelphia News

“Nava Atlas, a noted cookbook author/illustrator, has now stepped to the plate with a very clearly written, thoroughly tested, and useful new book....I strongly recommend this book!"—Mollie Katzen, bestselling cookbook author

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307492814
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/10/2009
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 1,287,029
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

Nava Atlas
Nava Atlas is the author of Vegetariana, Vegetarian Celebrations, and Vegetarian Soups for All Seasons, among other vegetarian cookbooks. She has also contributed frequently to Vegetarian Times and other natural health magazines. Visit her web site, “In the Vegetarian Kitchen” at vegkitchen.com. Nava lives in the Hudson Valley region of New York with her husband and two sons.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

Simplicity In

a Soup Pot

Have you ever noticed that the phrase "soul-satisfying" often accompanies the word "soup"? A good soup does as much for the spirit as it does for the stomach. Whether it's an Asian-style broth or a thick puree, I can think of no other food that gives as much comfort.

Of all the sections in this book, I found this one to be most challenging. For me, making soup is a magical alchemy—cutting up a number of ingredients, adding a pinch of several spices and seasonings, and, after heating long enough, the disparate mixture gradually becomes a cohesive (and very flavorful) whole. And despite (or maybe because of) having written an entire book on vegetarian soups, it was not as easy as I thought to come up with soups that can perform this culinary magic with five or fewer ingredients.

More so than in some of the other categories in this book, I rely on "helpers" as shortcuts to good flavor. Canned vegetable stock or bouillon, seasoning mixes, and often, a single assertive fresh herb helped me ensure flavorful results in very simple soups.

These recipes are for those times when you crave a soup that can be prepared quickly, but not one that comes straight from a can. Many are nearly instant; others take as much time to simmer as a soup made with a multitude of ingredients. But in either case, I hope you will find that phrase, "soul-satisfying," an apt description.

Cold Potato-Barley

Buttermilk Soup

Potatoes, barley, and buttermilk are a trio that I find blissfully refreshing in the summer, served cold in a soup.

1Peel the potatoes and cut into approximately 4-inch dice. Cover with water and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook until the potatoes are about half done, about 10 minutes. Add the green beans and cook until both are tender but not overdone, about 10 minutes longer. Remove from the heat, but do not drain.

2Let the potato-green bean mixture stand, uncovered, until it is at room temperature, then add the remaining ingredients. Serve at room temperature, or cover and refrigerate until chilled, if desired.

6 SERVINGS

4 medium-large potatoes

2 cups fresh green beans,

trimmed and cut into 1-inch lengths

(or frozen cut green beans, thawed)

14 cups cooked barley

(from 4 cup raw; see Basic

Cooked Barley, page 101)

2 cups buttermilk

2 cup chopped fresh dill

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 183 Total fat: 0 g

Protein: 6 g Carbohydrate: 38 g

Cholesterol: 3 mg Sodium: 50 mg

Cold Soups

Mid- to late summer is our brief chance to grab what we can of sun, sand, and—soup. Okay, so soup might not be something that springs immediately to mind when you think of summer pleasures, but I find few things more refreshing on a warm summer day than a bowl of cold soup.

To round out a meal of cold soup, add a substantial salad, a good bread, and if you'd like, some fresh corn on the cob. These cool, flavorful elixirs whet the wilted appetite like nothing else can!

Warm or Cold Tomato

and White Bean Soup

Fresh herbal overtones lift the flavor of this instant soup. White beans make a creamy base for soups, dips, and sauces.

1Reserve half of the beans and place the rest in a food processor along with the remaining ingredients.

2Puree until smooth. Transfer to a serving container if serving cold or to a large saucepan if serving hot. Stir in the reserved beans.

3Serve at once if you'd like this at room temperature, or cover and refrigerate until chilled if desired. If you'd like to serve this warm, heat slowly in a large saucepan, and serve.

6 SERVINGS

Two 16-ounce cans cannellini (large white beans), drained and rinsed

One 28-ounce can stewed

low-sodium tomatoes

2 scallions, green parts only, chopped

2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro, parsley, or dill, or to taste

1 to 2 teaspoons salt-free

herb-and-spice seasoning mix,

or to taste

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 179 Total fat: 0 g

Protein: 9 g Carbohydrate: 34 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 344 mg

Creamy Pinto Bean Puree

This features a base of canned beans and is best served at room temperature.

For a smooth texture, combine all the ingredients in a food processor and process until just pureed. For a soup with added texture, reserve 4 cup or so of the pinto beans, then stir into the pureed mixture.

5 TO 6 SERVINGS

Two 16-ounce cans pinto beans, drained and rinsed

One 14- to 16-ounce can

low-sodium diced tomatoes

or one 14- to 16-ounce can

Mexican-style stewed tomatoes

2 cups buttermilk

1Ú4 cup fresh cilantro

or parsley leaves

1 teaspoon chili powder

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 220 Total fat: 1 g

Protein: 13 g Carbohydrate: 39 g

Cholesterol: 3 mg Sodium: 445 mg

MENU

Creamy Pinto Bean Puree (page 16)

Mushroom and Bell Pepper Quesadillas or Soft Tacos (page 172)

Shredded dark green lettuce and diced tomatoes

Good-quality low-fat tortilla chips

Cold Fresh Tomato Soup

Here's a great way to take advantage of late summer's sublime tomatoes. Use the ripest tomatoes possible.

1Place all the ingredients in a food processor and process to a chunky puree.

2Transfer to a serving container and serve at once, or cover and refrigerate until chilled, if desired.

6 SERVINGS

3 pounds flavorful tomatoes, quartered

1 cup tomato juice, or as needed

2 cup chopped fresh basil or dill

1 to 2 scallions, minced, optional

Juice of 4 lemon

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 53 Total fat: 0 g

Protein: 2 g Carbohydrate: 11 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 141 mg

MENU

Cold Fresh Tomato Soup (page 17)

Pasta "Tuna" Salad (page 60)

or

Pasta and Broccoli Salad (page 58)

Fresh Italian Bread

Fresh Tomato and Corn Soup

This soup is simple but labor intensive. If you want to immerse yourself in the summery, sensory experience of peeling fresh tomatoes and scraping kernels off of corn cobs, you won't regret it. This is an appealing accompaniment to a late summer meal of grilled vegetables and veggie burgers.

1Bring water to a simmer in a soup pot. Add the whole tomatoes, bring to a simmer, and cook for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and drain.

2When the tomatoes are cool enough to handle, slip off the skins, chop them into bite-size pieces, and set aside.

3Scrape the corn kernels off of the cobs and set them aside.

4Heat the oil in the same soup pot. Add the onion and sautŽ over medium heat until golden, then add the corn kernels and enough fresh water to cover. Bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer gently until the corn is just tender, 5 to 10 minutes.

5Add the tomatoes and parsley. Return to a simmer and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and season with salt and pepper. Let the soup stand until just warm, and serve.

6 SERVINGS

3 pounds flavorful tomatoes

1 tablespoon light olive oil

4 to 6 ears fresh corn, uncooked

1 large onion, finely chopped

2 to 4 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 123 Total fat: 3 g

Protein: 3 g Carbohydrate: 21 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 22 mg

Cold Curried Cucumber Soup

Here's another nearly-instant cold soup. While cucumbers may not be the most nutritious of vegetables, they are undoubtedly one of the most refreshing. On a very hot day, if you want to be as cool as one, serve this lilting cucumber soup.

Combine all the ingredients in a serving container. If time allows, cover and refrigerate for about an hour before serving to allow the flavors to blend.

6 SERVINGS

1 quart buttermilk

1 large cucumber, peeled,

seeded, and grated

(or 4 large English cucumber)

2 cup minced fresh cilantro

or parsley

2 scallions, thinly sliced

1 to 2 teaspoons good-quality

curry powder, or to taste

Salt to taste

Calories: 74 Total fat: 1 g

Protein: 6 g Carbohydrate: 9 g

Cholesterol: 6 mg Sodium: 84 mg

MENU

Cold Curried Cucumber Soup (page 19)

Warm Pita Bread

Curried Potato-Tomato Salad (page 57)

Fruited Bulgur Salad (page 48)

Miso Onion Soup

This is a soothing remedy when you are coming down with a cold—though you need not wait for a cold to try it!

1Heat the oil in a soup pot. Add the onions and sautŽ over medium-low heat until golden. Add the garlic and continue to sautŽ slowly until

the onions are lightly browned, stirring often, 15 to 20 minutes.

2Add 5 cups water and the ginger. Bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer gently for 15 minutes.

3Stir in the dissolved miso, remove from the heat, and allow the soup to stand for 15 minutes, covered, and serve.

6 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons light olive oil

6 medium white or red onions, quartered and thinly sliced

3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

3 to 4 tablespoons miso (any variety) dissolved in A cup warm water, or to taste

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 108 Total fat: 5 g

Protein: 7 g Carbohydrate: 13 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 465 mg

Miso Soup with Mushrooms, Snow Peas, and Tofu

This nicely flavored miso soup is made more substantial with the addition of tofu. Fresh shiitake mushrooms impart the best flavor to the broth. Follow with an Asian-style noodle dish, such as Asian Sesame-Soy Noodles (page 85).

1Combine the mushrooms and 5 cups water in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer gently for about 10 minutes.

2Add the snow peas and tofu. Simmer just until the snow peas are tender-crisp, about 3 minutes.

3Stir in the scallions and dissolved miso, remove from the heat, and serve.

4 TO 6 SERVINGS

14 to 2 cups mushrooms

(shiitake, cremini, or baby bella), cleaned, stemmed, and sliced

4 ounces (about 2 cups) fresh

snow peas, trimmed and cut in

half crosswise

8 ounces firm tofu, well drained

and cut into small dice

2 scallions, sliced

3 to 4 tablespoons miso (any variety) dissolved in A cup water

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 105 Total fat: 2 g

Protein: 7 g Carbohydrate: 14 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 561 mg

Miso Soup

In Japan, miso soup is often eaten for breakfast. For the Western palate though, I think miso soup is more likely to find acceptance as an appetizer, as it does in Japanese restaurants. Miso, a salty, pungent paste made of fermented soybeans, adds a full-bodied flavor to soup broth. You'll have better luck finding it in natural foods stores than in supermarkets. If you're unfamiliar with the flavor of miso, start with 2 tablespoons in these recipes. Taste, then add more dissolved miso to your liking. Please be aware that once miso is stirred into hot water, it should not be boiled; otherwise, its beneficial enzymes will be destroyed.

Miso comes in several varieties, falling under three basic categories: pure soybean, soybean with barley, and soybean with rice. Soybean (hatcho) miso is the most pungent and intense; rice varieties, of which there are several, are the mildest; and barley (mugi) miso falls somewhere in the middle. Shiro miso is one variety of mild, yellowish miso (sometimes labeled "mellow white") that is popular in our domestic natural foods market. Any type of rice miso makes tasty dressings and sauces. All varieties of miso work well in soup—which to choose is entirely up to you and your palate.

Asian Noodle Broth

A trip to an Asian market to find exotic noodles is no longer necessary. Most well-stocked supermarkets feature an array of imported noodles in the Asian foods section. See the menu with Instant Tofu and Mixed Vegetable Stir-Fry (page 144).

1Combine the noodles with hot water to cover in a heatproof container. Cover and soak until al dente, 15 to 20 minutes.

2Meanwhile, combine the broth, mushrooms, and ginger in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer until the mushrooms are done, about 10 minutes.

3Drain the noodles well. Transfer them to a cutting board and chop in several directions to shorten.

4Stir the noodles and scallions into the broth and season with pepper. Add a bit more water if the soup is too thick. Serve at once.

4 SERVINGS

4 ounces bean-thread (cellophane) or rice-stick noodles

Two 15-ounce cans vegetable broth

8 to 10 ounces white or cremini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced

(use presliced if desired)

4 to 1 teaspoon grated

fresh ginger, or to taste

3 to 4 scallions, thinly sliced

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 127 Total fat: 0 g

Protein: 2 g Carbohydrate: 28 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 222 mg

Asian-Style Soups

Asian-style soups are ideal to make when you want a good soup quickly, with little forethought. With a burst of inspiration and a few choice ingredients, a tasty soup is a few minutes away. While most soups benefit from being made ahead of time to develop flavor, these are best eaten as soon as they are made.

Rice, Lettuce,

and Mushroom Broth

If you find yourself with too much lettuce and some leftover rice, here's a great way to use both.

1Combine the mushrooms, bouillon cubes, and 4 cups water in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer gently until the mushrooms are tender, about 10 minutes.

2Add the remaining ingredients and cook until everything is heated through, about 5 minutes, and serve.

4 TO 6 SERVINGS

8 to 10 ounces white or cremini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced

(use presliced if desired)

2 vegetable bouillon cubes

2 cups cooked rice

2 cups finely shredded dark

green lettuce

2 scallions, thinly sliced

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Calories: 113 Total fat: 0 g

Protein: 3 g Carbohydrate: 23 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 62 mg

MENU

Rice, Lettuce, and Mushroom Broth (page 23)

Broccoli and Tofu in Thai Peanut Sauce (page 143)

Simple tossed salad (include dark green lettuce, tomatoes, and carrot)


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 29, 2009

    Get the print version

    This eBook doesn't look like it was formatted properly. In many cases the recipe instructions are listed first, then a description of the recipe, followed by the ingredient list (although the order can vary). In some cases there is no real break between the recipes. (i.e. you get the ingredient list from the prior recipe followed by the next recipe name and directions on a page). There also is no index of recipes/ingredients like you would normally find in the back of a cookbook, so it will be difficult to find recipes you may be interested in. The only thing that may help is the chapter headings (soups, salads, pasta meals, etc.) I gave it three starts because it does have tips and ideas for combining recipes for meal ideas, and there are several recipes I'd like to try (when I can take the time to find them again!) but the formatting really ruins it. If you're interested in this book, go for the print version.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2008

    Great book for easy recipes!

    I am a new vegetarian. I think this book is great for people like me (a late 20's girl that doesn't have a lot of cooking skills who still wants to try to cook). I bought a few other books here that were recommended but didn't like them as much.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2007

    5 Ingredients Rocks

    I just bought this cookbook after a co-worker suggested it. Its got loads of easy, inexpensive recipes. I love how it has the nutritional facts for each recipe! Its not totally vegan, however. The author has many notes of how to make some of the recipes vegan friendly, but she has some that are strictly vegan also. Overall, its a pretty useful book to have around.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2012

    Lifesaver for young kids

    I bought this book when it first came out and used it practically every day to feed my then 8-9 year old. We still eat things from this book!! This is packed with delicious and easy recipes for vegetarians or anyone who likes simple, tasty recipes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

    5 ingredents

    This is good for people with little money to spend.

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