Ventilation In America Dwellings

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Chapter m. Ventilation Of A Room Loaded With Frodtcts Of Oombustio Fbom Gas', And Subject To Offensive Cold Cubbent8 On The Floob. In a room warmed by an open fire, there are great complaints of a current of cold air passing along...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Chapter m. Ventilation Of A Room Loaded With Frodtcts Of Oombustio Fbom Gas', And Subject To Offensive Cold Cubbent8 On The Floob. In a room warmed by an open fire, there are great complaints of a current of cold air passing along the floor, while the air on the line of respiration feels heavy and oppressive, producing great restlessness, particularly when a series of gas- burners are lighted that give a brilliant illumination. This is one of the most common forms of complaint in numerous apartments, and the causes will be obvious on inspecting the accompanying figures. The air admitted being very cold, and entering partly by a slight leakage at the window, but principally below the door, from a passage not warmed artificially, has little tendency to rise, and passes along the floor to the fire-place. The gas, however, induces a powerful current at a, Fig. 1, which ascends with force and strikes upon the ceiling, where it is soon diffused, and descends on every side as it cools. Part of it mixes with fresh air below, and is carried off by the action of the fire; the rest ascends again by a rotatory movement towards the gas-burners, where it mingles a second time in the current, ascending and descending as before. The upper portion of the air is accordingly largely charged with moisture and carbonic acid gas, the principal products of its combustion. 20 PREVENTION OF COLD CURRENTS ON THE FLOOR. In Fig. 2, the principal arrangements necessary for removing these evils are shown in one of the many modes by which this can be accomplished. A free supply of air is admitted by the flue A, being drawn from a central apparatus supplying warm air. A much smaller open fire is then sufficient; with warmer air it may be rendered unnecessary. In warm weather cold air is admitte...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781103017553
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 1/28/2009
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 0.51 (d)

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Chapter m. Ventilation Of A Room Loaded With Frodtcts Of Oombustio Fbom Gas', And Subject To Offensive Cold Cubbent8 On The Floob. In a room warmed by an open fire, there are great complaints of a current of cold air passing along the floor, while the air on the line of respiration feels heavy and oppressive, producing great restlessness, particularly when a series of gas- burners are lighted that give a brilliant illumination. This is one of the most common forms of complaint in numerous apartments, and the causes will be obvious on inspecting the accompanying figures. The air admitted being very cold, and entering partly by a slight leakage at the window, but principally below the door, from a passage not warmed artificially, has little tendency to rise, and passes along the floor to the fire-place. The gas, however, induces a powerful current at a, Fig. 1, which ascends with force and strikes upon the ceiling, where it is soon diffused, and descends on every side as it cools. Part of it mixes with fresh air below, and is carried off by the action of the fire; the rest ascends again by a rotatory movement towards the gas-burners, where it mingles a second time in the current, ascending and descending as before. The upper portion of the air is accordingly largely charged with moisture and carbonic acid gas, the principal products of its combustion. 20 PREVENTION OF COLD CURRENTS ON THE FLOOR. In Fig. 2, the principal arrangements necessary for removing these evils are shown in one of the many modes by which this can be accomplished. A free supply of air is admitted by the flue A, being drawn from a central apparatus supplying warm air. A much smaller open fire is then sufficient;with warmer air it may be rendered unnecessary. In warm weather cold air is admitte...
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