Verdure: Simple Recipes in the Italian Style [NOOK Book]

Overview

One hundred healthful and delicious Italian recipes centered on the best fresh, seasonal produce
From artichoke frittata to zucchini soup, Vitale offers simple and nutritious recipes dedicated entirely to vegetables. Providing tips on selecting fresh ingredients and bringing out each dish’s unique flavor, Verdure represents the best of northern Italian cuisine, and is a must-have for anyone seeking no-frills meals using the best that any local ...
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Verdure: Simple Recipes in the Italian Style

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Overview

One hundred healthful and delicious Italian recipes centered on the best fresh, seasonal produce
From artichoke frittata to zucchini soup, Vitale offers simple and nutritious recipes dedicated entirely to vegetables. Providing tips on selecting fresh ingredients and bringing out each dish’s unique flavor, Verdure represents the best of northern Italian cuisine, and is a must-have for anyone seeking no-frills meals using the best that any local produce market has to offer.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Italians, and northern Italians in particular, are justly famous for knowing how to get the most out of vegetables by doing the least to them. For everyone who has overplanted the garden at home or been tempted by the produce at a farm market and brought way too much home, this elegant little book with its 100 recipes, from artichokes to zucchini, provides plenty of inspiration.

Thoughtfully organized by vegetable, each chapter in Verdure offers a handful of tasty recipes plus basic advice about selection and cooking times for steaming, sautéing, boiling, microwaving, or roasting. Vitale also points out compatible flavors for each vegetable, which is highly useful for devising impromptu menus. (Spinach, for example, has great affinities with butter, olive oil, mild and sharp cheeses, pastry, garlic, smoked meats, walnuts, pine nuts, nutmeg, and more.) From Artichoke Fritatta and Baked Fennel with Béchamel Sauce to Raw Zucchini Salad with Parmigiano-Reggiano, the recipes all look simple and delicious. (Ginger Curwen)

Publishers Weekly
The recipes in this slim, very pleasant book "dedicated entirely to vegetables" take the familiar concept of Italian simplicity to a refreshing extreme. Most of them, like Saut ed Cucumbers which has four ingredients, including salt and pepper and Fresh Tomatoes with Mozzarella and Basil are impeccably brief and uncomplicated. Chapters, which are arranged by vegetable, open with amiable introductions and list cooking times for basic preparations like boiling, microwaving and roasting. Interestingly, there are more salads (Fennel Salad) and saut ed side dishes (Saut ed Radicchio in Olive Oil) than pastas. In the occasional headers, Milan native Vitale (Riso) provides personal anecdotes she used to make English Muffin Pizzette for her children as an after-school snack and likes to take Spinach Frittata when she goes sailing on Long Island Sound. In the recipe for Potatoes with Pesto, for example, Vitale recommends including parsley, and, in the introduction to zucchini, she notes that Italian cooks consider zucchini to be past its prime unless the blossom is still attached. With clear, simple instructions, Vitale offers enticing fare, much of it of particular interest in these hot summer days. (July) Forecast: With a pretty cover design and at an excellent price, this cookbook will appeal to the many who want to grace their tables with vegetables Italian style. A rave blurb from Diana Shaw (Almost Vegetarian) will lure buyers. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
“This cookbook will appeal to the many who want to grace their tables with vegetables Italian style.” —Publishers Weekly
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453246269
  • Publisher: Open Road Media
  • Publication date: 3/13/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 140
  • Sales rank: 87,525
  • File size: 494 KB

Meet the Author

Gioietta Vitale is the author of Riso (1992) and Verdure (2001), celebrated cookbooks for timeless Italian dishes focused on rice and vegetables. Born in Milan, Vitale is a former chairwoman for the American Italian Cancer Foundation and devotes much of her time to raising money for cancer research. She currently lives in Palm Beach, Florida.
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Read an Excerpt

Verdure

Simple Recipes in the Italian Style


By Gioietta Vitale, Robin Vitetta-Miller

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2001 Gioietta Vitale
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4532-4626-9



CHAPTER 1

Artichokes

CARCIOFI


Artichokes are the immature flower buds of a thistle plant. The edible portion—the velvety texture found at the base of each leaf and the center of the "cone"— tastes like a cross between celery and asparagus.

THERE ARE SEVERAL VARIETIES OF ARTICHOKE, WITH GREEN GLOBE BEING the most readily available. Baby and regular size artichokes come from the same plant, but their size is determined by placement on the plant. Baby artichokes grow down among the shady base, where they are shielded from the toughening and growth- enhancing rays of the sun. Since baby artichokes are uniformly tender, the whole vegetable is edible, raw or cooked.

Baby artichokes range in size from that of a walnut to a jumbo egg (size is not an indicator of age; some types are just bigger than others). Larger artichokes vary in size from medium (about 8 ounces), to large (about 10 ounces), to jumbo (about 12 ounces).

Artichokes have several parts worth mentioning. The "choke" is the inedible fuzzy portion in the middle of medium, large, and jumbo artichokes (baby artichokes have no choke). Remove the choke easily by scooping it out with a spoon after the vegetable has been steamed or poached. The terms "heart" and "bottom" are often used interchangeably, but they're actually two different things. The "heart," located in the center of the artichoke, comprises the pale, inner leaves and the firm-fleshed base. The "bottom," or saucer shaped portion of the artichoke, is free of the choke and leaves and is touted as the most prized portion of the vegetable.

Artichokes are available year-round, but spring is the domestic (California) peak season. Choose artichokes that are firm and heavy for their size, with tight, compact leaves. Color varies from green to purplish red, and some artichokes—exposed to an early frost—may have a yellowish tinge or brown spotting; slight discolorations do not affect quality or taste (in fact, some say frost enhances flavor). Since all artichokes are mature when picked, avoid any that look dry or withered. Fresh artichokes have a rich, meaty flavor with a clean aftertaste, but old artichokes can be dull and tasteless.

Baby artichokes are ideal for eating raw in salads. They can also be marinated, sautéed, and added to soups, sauces, stews, and pot roasts. Medium and large artichokes are perfect for side dishes and light meals. When trimmed and sliced, they can be battered and fried, or added to stir-fries and pasta dishes. Stuffed jumbo artichokes make a complete and satisfying entree. To eat the larger artichokes, pull off a leaf, drag it through your teeth, and discard the portion that doesn't come off easily. The tiniest inner leaves are completely edible.

Artichokes pair well with sharp flavors such as lemon, orange, wine, vinegar, olives, capers, smoked meats such as ham and bacon, garlic, shallots, bay leaves, parsley, sage, tarragon, fennel, and oregano. In Italy, we enjoy dipping the leaves in extra virgin olive oil that's been seasoned with a little salt, pepper, and lemon juice. To prepare artichokes for cooking, slice off the top 1 inch from each artichoke to remove the thornlike tips. Slice the stem end so it's even with the base (or leave 1 inch of stem, if desired) and pull away any dry or tough outer leaves. To prevent discoloration while you are working, immerse trimmed artichokes in a large bowl of ice water that has the juice of one lemon squeezed into it.

To store fresh artichokes, sprinkle them with a little water, place in perforated plastic bags, and store in the refrigerator crisper for up to one week.


COOKING TIMES

(times vary depending on artichoke size; artichokes are ready to eat when an outer leaf pulls off easily)

BOILING (standing in 3 inches of water) and steaming (over 1 to 2 inches of boiling water): 15 to 20 minutes for baby artichokes, 25 to 40 minutes for medium, large, and jumbo artichokes

MICROWAVING (in ½ inch of water): 6 to 10 minutes (for all sizes)


BOILED ARTICHOKES

CARCIOFI LESSATI

The beauty of this recipe lies in its simplicity. These artichokes make a lovely side dish served with roast beef or baked ham.

6 medium artichokes (about 8 ounces each)
1 lemon
8 to 9 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 ½ tablespoons white wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


SLICE off the top 1 inch from each artichoke to remove the thornlike tips. Slice the stem end so it's even with the base (or leave 1 inch of stem, if desired) and pull away any dry or tough outer leaves. As you trim them, transfer the artichokes to a large stockpot with enough water to cover and the juice of the lemon. Set the pot over medium-high heat and brings to a boil. Reduce the heat, partially cover, and simmer 20 minutes, until tender (outer leaves will pull off easily).

Drain, turn artichokes upside down, and let cool slightly.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. Place the artichokes in individual, shallow bowls and serve with olive oil mixture on the side for dipping the leaves.

Serves 6


FRIED ARTICHOKES

CARCIOFI FRITTI

10 baby artichokes
2 lemons
3 large eggs, separated
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 cups olive oil


SLICE off the top 1 inch from each artichoke to remove the thornlike tips. Slice the stem end so it's even with the base (or leave 1 inch of stem, if desired) and pull away any dry or tough outer leaves. Transfer the artichokes to a large bowl of ice water that has the juice of 1 lemon added.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg whites until frothy. Whisk in the yolks and salt.

Drain the artichokes and cut into four equal wedges (length-wise). There may be tougher leaves and fuzz in the middle. If necessary, using a spoon, remove the inner core of each artichoke quarter (pale inner leaves) and scrape away the fuzzy middle. Return to the bowl of water and lemon juice.

Place the flour in a shallow dish. Drain artichokes well and pat dry with paper towels. Add artichoke wedges to the flour and turn to coat. Dip the flour-coated artichokes into the egg mixture and let stand 5 minutes (they should become saturated with egg mixture).

Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a heavy stockpot until a thermometer reads 350° to 375° F. Add the artichokes in two or three batches (to keep oil temperature constant) and fry until golden brown on all sides, about 5 minutes. Remove the artichokes with a slotted spoon and drain on paper toweling. Cut the remaining lemon into wedges. Serve the artichokes hot with lemon wedges on the side.

Serves 4


RAW BABY ARTICHOKE SALAD

INSALATA DI CARCIOFI CRUDI

The baby artichokes in this salad are eaten raw, and they are so delicate and tasty—like the petals on a rose. Serve this delightful salad as a first course or as a side dish with veal scaloppini or sautéed chicken.

12 baby artichokes
4 lemons
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 ½ teaspoons salt


SLICE off the top ¼ to ½ inch from one artichoke to remove the thornlike tips, if necessary. Slice the stem end so it's even with the base and pull away any dry or tough outer leaves. Transfer to a large bowl of cold water and add the juice from 1 lemon. This is done to prevent discoloration. Repeat with remaining artichokes.

Drain the artichokes and cut each in half lengthwise. Place halves cut side down on a cutting board and thinly slice lengthwise.

Place the artichoke slices in a large bowl and add the juice from the remaining 3 lemons, olive oil, and salt. Toss to combine. Serve immediately.

Serves 4


Variation

BABY ARTICHOKES WITH PARMIGIANO REGGIANO

CARCIOFI FRESCHI CON PARMIGIANO-REGGIANO

TOP artichoke slices with thinly sliced Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (use a vegetable peeler to obtain thin slices).


ARTICHOKE FRITTATA

FRITTATA DI CARCIOFI

Frittatas are delicious.

12 baby artichokes
2 lemons
6 large eggs
2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Salt and freshly ground black, pepper
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided


SLICE off the top ¼ to ½ inch from each artichoke to remove the thornlike tips, if necessary. Slice the stem end so it's even with the base and pull away any dry or tough outer leaves. Transfer the artichokes to a large bowl, add the juice of 1 lemon, and pour over enough cold water to cover.

In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

Drain the artichokes and cut in half lengthwise. Place halves cut side down on a cutting board and thinly slice lengthwise.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichokes and sauté 3 minutes, until golden. Remove the artichokes from the pan with a slotted spoon and dry on paper toweling (keep skillet hot).

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until frothy. Add artichokes and mix well. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to the hot skillet. Pour mixture into hot skillet and cook 3 minutes, until almost cooked through to the top. Invert the frittata onto a large plate and slide frittata back into skillet, uncooked side down. Cook over medium heat until cooked through (a wooden pick inserted will come out clean).

Serve hot, room temperature, or chilled with remaining lemon sliced on the side.

Serves 4

CHAPTER 2

Asparagus

ASPARAGI

In the ancient Greek language, asparagus meant "shoot," an appropriate name for this grasslike member of the lily family that bursts out of the ground in the spring. These shoots, or asparagus spears, grow at different rates, so they must be harvested by hand—a time-consuming process that also shoots up the price. If the shoots were not picked, they would grow into tall, fernlike shrubs with bright red berries.

Asparagus varieties vary in color from green to purple—or a combination of the two. The spears range in thickness from very thin to almost 1 inch thick at the ends. Very thin asparagus is the youngest and most tender. Also available are cream or off-white shoots; this variety is grown without sunlight in order to prevent photosynthesis, the chemical process that turns vegetables green. Whether green, purple, or white, the taste of fresh asparagus is virtually identical.

Available year-round thanks to shipments from the Southern Hemisphere, asparagus is in peak season in the United States from late February through July. Asparagus season is often thought of as the first sign of spring for those anticipating the warmer months.

When shopping, select crisp, tightly closed, straight spears with fresh- looking cut ends. Avoid limp spears and any that show signs of drying at the ends.

Thin asparagus spears are best steamed, boiled, microwaved, sautéed, and stir-fried. The fleshy spears of thicker asparagus are great for roasting and grilling. To prepare asparagus for cooking, rinse the spears under cold water and snap off any woody ends. Thinner spears may need just a slight trimming of the tough ends; thicker asparagus often benefits from peeling the outer layer off of the bottom few inches. Asparagus has great affinities for butter, olive oil, hollandaise sauce, eggs, sharp cheese, shallots, bay leaves, basil, oregano, tarragon, and sage.

Best used within two days of purchase, asparagus will keep up to five days if stored properly, in a tightly closed paper bag in the refrigerator crisper.


COOKING TIMES

(for crisp-tender asparagus)

BOILING, STEAMING, AND MICROWAVING: 4 to 5 minutes for thin spears, 8 to 10 minutes for thick spears

SAUTÉING AND STIR-FRYING: 6 to 10 minutes (depending on spear size)

ROASTING AT 500° F: 8 to 10 minutes

GRILLING: 5 to 7 minutes, turning frequently


ASPARAGUS SALAD WITH POTATO-ANCHOVY DRESSING

INSALATA DI ASPARAGI CON PATATE CONDITECON SALSA DI ACCIUGHE

An interesting blend of salty anchovies, starchy potato, and fresh sweet asparagus. This side dish pairs perfectly with sautéed or grilled chicken and steak. If desired, you can make the dressing in advance and refrigerate. Reheat in a small saucepan over low heat until warm.

2 pounds thin asparagus spears, woody ends trimmed
1 large potato, peeled and diced
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
8 whole anchovies, chopped
½ cup chopped fresh parsley
4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


BLANCH the asparagus in a large pot of rapidly boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes, until crisp-tender. Drain and immerse in a large bowl of ice water to prevent further cooking. Drain and set aside.

Cook the potato in a small pot of rapidly boiling water for 10 minutes, until fork tender. Drain and set aside.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the anchovies and potato and, using the back of a spoon, mash the two together until blended. Sauté 2 minutes, until hot. Remove from the heat and stir in the parsley and lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

To serve, transfer the asparagus to a serving plate and spoon anchovy dressing over top.

Serves 4 to 6


ASPARAGUS MILANESE WITH FRIED EGGS

ASPARAGI ALLA MILANESE CON UOVA FRITTE

This traditional Milanese dish is as popular as risotto alla milanese in my home town of Milano. When I was a child, fresh asparagus was available only in the spring (not year-round as it is today). When asparagus season began, so did the wonderful elements associated with springtime—mild weather, aromatic flowers, the thrilling feeling of nature awakening all around us. Serve this dish with a nice dry wine, such as Pinot Grigio (very cold).

28 to 32 medium asparagus spears (about 2 ½ pounds), woody ends trimmed
½ cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
3 to 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
8 large eggs, divided
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


BLANCH the asparagus in a large pot of rapidly boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes, until crisp-tender. Drain and divide onto four serving plates. Sprinkle the top with Parmigiano-Reggiano and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add 2 eggs and cook until the yolks are just cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes, turning halfway through the cooking if desired. Arrange the fried eggs on the Parmigianino-topped asparagus. Repeat with the remaining eggs, adding additional olive oil as necessary. Sprinkle the top with salt and pepper and serve warm.

Serves 4


ASPARAGUS SALAD IN OLIVE OIL AND LEMON

ASPARAGI IN INSALATA CON OLIO D'OLIVA E LIMONE

2 pounds thin fresh asparagus, woody ends trimmed
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 lemon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


BLANCH the asparagus in a large pot of rapidly boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes, until crisp-tender. Drain and transfer to a large serving platter.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil and the juice from the lemon. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Spoon the dressing over the asparagus and toss to coat.

Serves 4 to 6


Variation

ASPARAGUS WITH VINAIGRETTE

2 ½ tablespoons vinegar (red or white wine)
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
5 to 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper


BLANCH the asparagus as described above.

In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar and mustard. Gradually add the olive oil and whisk until blended. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Spoon the dressing over the asparagus and toss to coat.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Verdure by Gioietta Vitale, Robin Vitetta-Miller. Copyright © 2001 Gioietta Vitale. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction,
ARTICHOKES (Carciofi),
ASPARAGUS (Asparagi),
BEANS (Fagioli),
BEETS (Barbabietole),
BROCCOLI (Broccoli),
CARROTS (Carote),
CAULIFLOWER (Cavolfiore),
CELERY (Sedani),
CUCUMBER (Cetrioli),
EGGPLANT (Melanzane),
FENNEL (Finocchi),
LENTILS (Lenticchie),
MUSHROOMS (Funghi),
ONIONS (Cipolle),
PEAS (Piselli),
PEPPERS (Peperoni),
POTATOES (Patate),
RADICCHIO (Radicchio),
SPINACH (Spinaci),
STRING BEANS (Fagiolini),
TOMATOES (Pomodori),
ZUCCHINI (Zucchine),
Index,

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 2, 2013

    One hundred healthful and delicious Italian recipes centered on

    One hundred healthful and delicious Italian recipes centered on the best fresh, seasonal produce From artichoke frittata to zucchini soup, Vitale offers simple and nutritious recipes dedicated entirely to vegetables. Providing tips on selecting fresh ingredients and bringing out each dish's unique flavor, Verdure represents the best of northern Italian cuisine, and is a must-have for anyone seeking no-frills meals using the best that any local produce market has to offer.

    Fantastic cookbook centered around strictly vegetables prepared in the Northern Italian style. I love Italian cooking, and constantly look for ways to fix vegetables more and more in a way my family will enjoy and return for seconds. This book looks like a winner!! Each vegetable has its own section with a description, time of year it is harvested, best ways to prepare, other vegetables it goes well with an cooking times and multiple recipes. I can't wait to start cooking!!

    I received a digital copy of this book from Open Road Integrated Media to read and review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

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  • Posted February 17, 2013

    I have a kitchen full of cookbooks, but am always on the lookout

    I have a kitchen full of cookbooks, but am always on the lookout for ideas for side dishes and veggie main courses. This little book, filled with fast and inexpensive recipes that don't require a huge pantry for additional ingredients, exceeded my expectations. The recipes are organized by vegetable main ingredient, and although a few are substantial, most are light and lovely. Each veg has a brief introduction that explains when to purchase, what to look for, cooking times and methods Nothing in the fridge but carrots? No prob--sautéed, mashed, fried or made into a simple salad, and all versions were delicious. How about a broccoli salad not weighed down with mayo and bacon, but herbed and lightly dressed? Or celery blanched and sautéed--it was delicious. Easy to read, well written recipes. Love this book!

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