Verificationism: Its History and Prospects

Verificationism: Its History and Prospects

by C.J. Misak
     
 

ISBN-10: 0415125979

ISBN-13: 9780415125970

Pub. Date: 12/18/1995

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Verificationism is the first comprehensive history of a concept that dominated philosophy and scientific methodology between the 1930s and the 1960s. The verificationist principle - the concept that a belief with no connection to experience is spurious - is the most sophisticated version of empiricism. More flexible ideas of verification are now being

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Overview

Verificationism is the first comprehensive history of a concept that dominated philosophy and scientific methodology between the 1930s and the 1960s. The verificationist principle - the concept that a belief with no connection to experience is spurious - is the most sophisticated version of empiricism. More flexible ideas of verification are now being rehabilitated by a number of philosophers.
C.J. Misak surveys the precursors, the main proponents and the rehabilitators. Unlike traditional studies, she follows verificationist theory beyond the demise of positivism to examine its reappearance in the work of modern philosophers. Most interestingly, she argues that despite feminism's strenuous opposition to positivism, verificationist thought is at the heart of much of contemporary feminist philosophy.
Verificationism is an excellent assessment of a major and influential system of thought.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780415125970
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
12/18/1995
Series:
Philosophical Issues in Science Series
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Introduction
Acknowledgements
1Founders
George Berkeley (1685-1753)
David Hume (1711-1776)
Auguste Comte (1798-1857)
John Stuart Mill (1806-1873)
Ernst Mach (1838-1916)
Pierre Duhem (1861-1916)
Albert Einstein (1879-1955)
Bertrand Russell (1872-1970)
Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951)
2The Logical Positivists and the Verifiability Principle
3Peirce and the Pragmatic Maxim
4What Is It to Understand a Sentence?
5Some Further Suggestions
Conclusion
Notes
References
Name Index
Subject Index

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