The Vertical Farm: Feeding the World in the 21st Century

The Vertical Farm: Feeding the World in the 21st Century

3.3 4
by Dickson Despommier

ISBN-10: 0312611390

ISBN-13: 9780312611392

Pub. Date: 10/12/2010

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

"The vertical farm is a world-changing innovation whose time has come. Dickson Despommier's visionary book provides a blueprint for securing the world's food supply and at the same time solving one of the gravest environmental crises facing us today."--Sting

Imagine a world where every town has their own local food source, grown in the safest way possible, where

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"The vertical farm is a world-changing innovation whose time has come. Dickson Despommier's visionary book provides a blueprint for securing the world's food supply and at the same time solving one of the gravest environmental crises facing us today."--Sting

Imagine a world where every town has their own local food source, grown in the safest way possible, where no drop of water or particle of light is wasted, and where a simple elevator ride can transport you to nature's grocery store - imagine the world of the vertical farm.

When Columbia professor Dickson Despommier set out to solve America's food, water, and energy crises, he didn't just think big - he thought up. Despommier's stroke of genius, the vertical farm, has excited scientists, architects, and politicians around the globe. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Despommier explains how the vertical farm will have an incredible impact on changing the face of this planet for future generations.

Despommier takes readers on an incredible journey inside the vertical farm, buildings filled with fruits and vegetables that will provide local food sources for entire cities.

Vertical farms will allow us to:
- Grow food 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
- Protect crops from unpredictable and harmful weather
- Re-use water collected from the indoor environment
- Provide jobs for residents
- Eliminate use of pesticides, fertilizers, or herbicides
- Drastically reduce dependence on fossil fuels
- Prevent crop loss due to shipping or storage
- Stop agricultural runoff

Vertical farms can be built in abandoned buildings and on deserted lots, transforming our cities into urban landscapes which will provide fresh food grown and harvested just around the corner. Possibly the most important aspect of vertical farms is that they can built by nations with little or no arable land, transforming nations which are currently unable to farm into top food producers. In the tradition of the bestselling The World Without Us, The Vertical Farm is a completely original landmark work destined to become an instant classic

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Product Details

St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

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The Vertical Farm: Feeding the World in the 21st Century 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Dose_of_Reality More than 1 year ago
I regularly read business books of various genres and was extremely disappointed in "The Vertical Farm". After a hundred pages that labor over the history of world agriculture and endless environmental rants, Dr. Dickson Despommier doesn't offer the reader even a shred of economic or cost and return data to substantiate the vertical farm. Nothing. After 256 pages, he simply closes his book by literally asking the reader to "suspend your own sense of reality and imagine along with me" of what could be. Holy smokes, sounds like Dr. Despommier has had some particularly fine success with hydroponic growing! However, let's just do a back-of-the-envelope feasibility. The only economics presented by Dr. Despommier is the assertion that hydroponic farming can produce 10 to 20 times the crop output per acre than that of a traditionally maintained farm field. Let's run with that and assume an acre of Iowa farmland costs $10,000 or around $.25 per square foot. Assuming a median of 15 times the efficiency of the traditional farm, the hydroponic equivalent cost would be $3.75 per square foot, which will be our baseline comparison to solely the construction cost of the vertical farm. As you read through the book, no expense is spared in the vertical farm concept. It has at least the cost of a high rise office building shell (say, $75 per SF) plus essentially a hermetically sealed, clean room environment, tons of growing equipment, photovoltaic panels, and artificial illumination (easily an additional $225 per SF). Let's add land cost, design cost, financing costs, and other fees and the vertical farm is around $375 per SF compared to the Iowa farm equivalent of $3.75 or around 100 times more expensive before a seed has been planted! Assuming any financing entity would want an annual 15% return on total cost for the risk associated with this specialized facility and one adds a twenty-five year amortization of costs, the resulting annualized capital cost for the vertical farm is $71.25 vs. $.375 per SF for the Iowa farm land (a 10% return on land cost) or an annual capital cost that is 190 times more expensive. But that is only the construction cost. Remember, we have to pay for the vertical farm's operating costs, which include labor, artificial lighting, the seed nursery, vertical transportation, and real estate, among others. There is no machinery for the vertical farm harvest. Everything is hand picked and maintained. Let's just assert that, in addition to the upfront capital costs and a return on those costs, it is 20 times more costly to actually grow and harvest crops from a vertical farm. So, just as a ballpark, the annual capital costs and operating costs are 190 times and 20 times more expensive, respectively. Let's just theorized that the vertical farm cost premium is somewhere in between the two premiums, say, 40 times as more expensive to deliver bananas to your grocery store. As a result, the bananas that now cost you $.50 per pound will cost you $20 per pound! (Again, I would love to have more data, and after reading 268 pages of rants, you would think that I should, but none is presented). In summary, "The Vertical Farm" does not meet the feasibility sniff test. Dr. Despommier is clearly a dreamer, as all futurists should be. However, let's offer up some ideas for solving our many (and well articulated by Dr. Despommier) environmental problems that have a modicum of a chance for seeing the light of day.
plappen More than 1 year ago
The current method of human agriculture is in bad shape, and is ultimately unsustainable. This book provides an alternative. Agriculture as we know it has worked for many thousands of years, but the system is breaking down. If there is such a thing as The Chronicle of Farm Life in the 20th Century, it is "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck. Three things that had a huge impact on agriculture were the internal combustion engine, and the discoveries of oil and dynamite. When irrigating fields, runoff is created that is full of chenicals and fertilizers applied to those fields. During floods, runoff gets even worse, because that chemical-filled water gets into the rivers, which empty into the ocean, creating aquatic "dead zones." In less developed countries, there is little or no attempt to filter or treat the water, and since fecal matter (human and animal) is frequently used as fertilizer, that just spreads lots of intestinal parasites. In many places, a 55-gallon drum of clean water is now more valuable than oil. Greenhouse gases are turning the world's oceans more acidic; the time will come when calcium carbonate, a central component of coral and mollusk shells, cannot form. Various bugs and plant diseases can also do immense damage to a wide area of crops. As agriculture becomes more commercialized, and farm sizes grow, food safety becomes a huge concern. Corporations want to cut costs wherever they can (like food inspection), and consumers have made it clear that food safety is at the top of the list. Imagine stacking several high-tech greenhouses on top of each other. Hydroponic gardening, which uses one-third the water of regular agriculture, is well known. Aeroponic gardening, where the roots are misted at the right times, uses one-third the water of hydroponics. The water can be treated and recycled so that it can be used over and over. No artificial chemicals would be needed. Such a vertical farm can be built in the city, vastly increasing the availability of fruits and vegetable for inner-city residents. The outer walls would be a type of clear, hard plastic, which is lighter than glass, to let in every available bit of sunlight. The corresponding amount of farmland would be allowed to turn back into whatever it was, usually hardwood forest, before it became farmland. Of course, theory is easy, while turning the theory into reality is much harder. This a fascinating book, even though it is light on the reality of what a vertical farm would look like. If it does nothing more than get people thinking about other methods of agriculture, this is a gem of a book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Prince_Rain More than 1 year ago
This book is a real treasure filled with valuable gems of knowledge. It's pages are filled with hope and possible answers to a brighter future. The concepts and principles in the book may one day be required knowledge of all students. A must read.