A Very Special House by Ruth Krauss, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
A Very Special House

A Very Special House

by Ruth Krauss
     
 

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Continuing a two-year program to bring back twenty-two Maurice Sendak treasures long out of print, our second season of publication highlights one of the most successful author-illustrator pairings of all time. A pioneer of great children's literature, Ruth Krausspublished more than thirty books for children during a career that spanned forty years. Krauss and Sendak

Overview

Continuing a two-year program to bring back twenty-two Maurice Sendak treasures long out of print, our second season of publication highlights one of the most successful author-illustrator pairings of all time. A pioneer of great children's literature, Ruth Krausspublished more than thirty books for children during a career that spanned forty years. Krauss and Sendak collaborated on eight books, and we are delighted to reintroduce four of these gems in brand-new editions, together with a favorite Maurice Sendak picture book.

Editorial Reviews

Saturday Review
Most, most special indeed! What fun! Sheer nonsense in text and pictures, the inimitable drawings of Mr. Sendak.
New York Times
. . . a unique book . . . with drwings bouncing with action and good humor.
Publishers Weekly
Now in its second season, HarperCollins's reissue of 22 Sendak classics continues. This time, his collaborations with Ruth Krauss take center stage. In Charlotte and the White Horse, first published in 1955, creamy pages frame Sendak's softly lit illustrations of a girl who convinces her father to keep a wobbly legged horse and cares for him until he can stand on his own. Sendak's delicate watercolors suit the dream-like mood of a boy who accomplishes all that he sets out to do in his imaginary world, in I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue (1956), also by Krauss. A boy's imagination also comes to the fore in A Very Special House (1953) by Krauss, as the artist depicts the hero creating a home filled with a turtle, a giant, a very old lion and "some monkeys and some skunkeys." Oversize pages brim with the creatures as well as his house's "very special" furnishings. Open House for Butterflies (1960) takes a similar format to these collaborators' classic A Hole Is to Dig, and lastly, Hector Protector and As I Went Over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes (1965) by Sendak conveys as much plot through the artist's wordless spreads as with the minimal text. For collectors and budding readers alike. Nov. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Pair an inventive, intuitive writer with one of America's greatest children's illustrators, and the result is a book that will captivate readers almost 50 years after its original release. Here, a young, "blue-overalled" boy exuberantly bounces, jumps, prances, and climbs through light orange pages filled with pen and ink sketches of "...a house for me Me ME." Krauss uses poetic, stream-of-consciousness language to describe the boy's adventures with lions, monkeys, rabbits, and other assorted creatures he imagines in his mind. This is a rollicking nonsense tale that will make perfect sense to its preschool audience. This hardback version is part of Harper Collins' series of reissues of Sendak's work, and will be an excellent addition for both school and public library collections. 2002 (orig. 1953), Harper Collins,
— Cherri Jones

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780064432283
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/1990
Series:
Trophy Picture Bks.
Pages:
32
Age Range:
4 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Ruth Krauss's beloved picture books include two Caldecott Honor Books, The Happy Day, illustrated by Marc Simont, and A Very Special House, illustrated by Maurice Sendak, as well as the perennial favorite A Hole is to Dig, also illustrated by Mr. Sendak.

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

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