The Vicar of Wakefield

( 19 )

Overview

Rich with wisdom and gentle irony, Oliver Goldsmith's only novel is a charming comedy that tells of an unworldly and generous vicar who lives contentedly with his large family until disaster strikes. When his idyllic life is brutally interrupted by bankruptcy and his daughter's abduction, he lands in prison. Yet these misfortunes fail to dampen the vicar's spirit or cause him to lose sight of Christian morality.

A delightful lampoon of such literary conventions of the day as ...

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Overview

Rich with wisdom and gentle irony, Oliver Goldsmith's only novel is a charming comedy that tells of an unworldly and generous vicar who lives contentedly with his large family until disaster strikes. When his idyllic life is brutally interrupted by bankruptcy and his daughter's abduction, he lands in prison. Yet these misfortunes fail to dampen the vicar's spirit or cause him to lose sight of Christian morality.

A delightful lampoon of such literary conventions of the day as pastoral scenes, artificial romance, and the hero's stoic bravery, The Vicar of Wakefield has remained a classic since it was first published in 1766.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199537549
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 12/15/2008
  • Series: Oxford World's Classics Series
  • Edition description: New
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 596,536
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert L. Mack has edited a number of volumes for Oxford World's Classics, including Burney's The Wanderer, and Oriental Tales. He is the author of Thomas Gray: A Life.

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Read an Excerpt

The Vicar of Wakefield


By OLIVER GOLDSMITH, SUSAN L. RATTINER

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2004 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-11080-6



CHAPTER 1

The description of the family of Wakefield; in which a kindred likeness prevails as well of minds as of persons

I WAS ever of opinion, that the honest man who married and brought up a large family, did more service than he who continued single, and only talked of population. From this motive, I had scarce taken orders a year before I began to think seriously of matrimony, and chose my wife as she did her wedding gown, not for a fine glossy surface, but such qualities as would wear well. To do her justice, she was a good-natured notable woman; and as for breeding, there were few country ladies who could shew more. She could read any English book without much spelling, but for pickling, preserving, and cookery, none could excel her. She prided herself also upon being an excellent contriver in housekeeping; tho' I could never find that we grew richer with all her contrivances.

However, we loved each other tenderly, and our fondness encreased as we grew old. There was in fact nothing that could make us angry with the world or each other. We had an elegant house, situated in a fine country, and a good neighbourhood. The year was spent in moral or rural amusements; in visiting our rich neighbours, and relieving such as were poor. We had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by the fire-side, and all our migrations from the blue bed to the brown.

As we lived near the road, we often had the traveller or stranger visit us to taste our gooseberry wine, for which we had great reputation; and I profess with the veracity of an historian, that I never knew one of them find fault with it. Our cousins too, even to the fortieth remove, all remembered their affinity, without any help from the Herald's office, and came very frequently to see us. Some of them did us no great honour by these claims of kindred; as we had the blind, the maimed, and the halt amongst the number. However, my wife always insisted that as they were the same flesh and blood, they should sit with us at the same table. So that if we had not very rich, we generally had very happy friends about us; for this remark will hold good thro' life, that the poorer the guest, the better pleased he ever is with being treated: and as some men gaze with admiration at the colours of a tulip, or the wing of a butterfly, so I was by nature an admirer of happy human faces. However, when any one of our relations was found to be a person of very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house, I ever took care to lend him a riding coat, or a pair of boots, or sometimes an horse of small value, and I always had the satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them. By this the house was cleared of such as we did not like; but never was the family of Wakefield known to turn the traveller or the poor dependent out of doors.

Thus we lived several years in a state of much happiness, not but that we sometimes had those little rubs which Providence sends to enhance the value of its favours. My orchard was often robbed by school-boys, and my wife's custards plundered by the cats or the children. The 'Squire would sometimes fall asleep in the most pathetic parts of my sermon, or his lady return my wife's civilities at church with a mutilated curtesy. But we soon got over the uneasiness caused by such accidents, and usually in three or four days began to wonder how they vext us.

My children, the offspring of temperance, as they were educated without softness, so they were at once well formed and healthy; my sons hardy and active, my daughters beautiful and blooming. When I stood in the midst of the little circle, which promised to be the supports of my declining age, I could not avoid repeating the famous story of Count Abensberg, who, in Henry II's progress through Germany, while other courtiers came with their treasures, brought his thirty-two children, and presented them to his sovereign as the most valuable offering he had to bestow. In this manner, though I had but six, I considered them as a very valuable present made to my country, and consequently looked upon it as my debtor. Our eldest son was named George, after his uncle, who left us ten thousand pounds. Our second child, a girl, I intended to call after her aunt Grissel; but my wife, who during her pregnancy had been reading romances, insisted upon her being called Olivia. In less than another year we had another daughter, and now I was determined that Grissel should be her name; but a rich relation taking a fancy to stand godmother, the girl was, by her directions, called Sophia; so that we had two romantic names in the family; but I solemnly protest I had no hand in it. Moses was our next, and after an interval of twelve years, we had two sons more.

It would be fruitless to deny my exultation when I saw my little ones about me; but the vanity and the satisfaction of my wife were even greater than mine. When our visitors would say, "Well, upon my word, Mrs.. Primrose, you have the finest children in the whole country."—"Ay, neighbour," she would answer, "they are as heaven made them, handsome enough, if they be good enough; for handsome is that handsome does." And then she would bid the girls hold up their heads; who, to conceal nothing, were certainly very handsome. Mere outside is so very trifling a circumstance with me, that I should scarce have remembered to mention it, had it not been a general topic of conversation in the country. Olivia, now about eighteen, had that luxuriancy of beauty with which painters generally draw Hebe; open, sprightly, and commanding. Sophia's features were not so striking at first; but often did more certain execution; for they were soft, modest, and alluring. The one vanquished by a single blow, the other by efforts successfully repeated.

The temper of a woman is generally formed from the turn of her features, at least it was so with my daughters. Olivia wished for many lovers, Sophia to secure one. Olivia was often affected from too great a desire to please. Sophia even represt excellence from her fears to offend. The one entertained me with her vivacity when I was gay, the other with her sense when I was serious. But these qualities were never carried to excess in either, and I have often seen them exchange characters for a whole day together. A suit of mourning has transformed my coquet into a prude, and a new set of ribbands has given her younger sister more than natural vivacity. My eldest son George was bred at Oxford, as I intended him for one of the learned professions. My second boy Moses, whom I designed for business, received a sort of a miscellaneous education at home. But it is needless to attempt describing the particular characters of young people that had seen but very little of the world. In short, a family likeness prevailed through all, and properly speaking, they had but one character, that of being all equally generous, credulous, simple, and inoffensive.

CHAPTER 2

Family misfortunes. The loss of fortune only serves to encrease the pride of the worthy

THE TEMPORAL concerns of our family were chiefly committed to my wife's management, as to the spiritual I took them entirely under my own direction. The profits of my living, which amounted to but thirty-five pounds a year, I made over to the orphans and widows of the clergy of our diocese; for having a sufficient fortune of my own, I was careless of temporalities, and felt a secret pleasure in doing my duty without reward. I also set a resolution of keeping no curate, and of being acquainted with every man in the parish, exhorting the married men to temperance and the bachelors to matrimony; so that in a few years it was a common saying, that there were three strange wants at Wakefield, a parson wanting pride, young men wanting wives, and ale-houses wanting customers.

Matrimony was always one of my favourite topics, and I wrote several sermons to prove its happiness: but there was a peculiar tenet which I made a point of supporting; for I maintained with Whiston, that it was unlawful for a priest of the church of England, after the death of his first wife, to take a second, or to express it in one word, I valued myself upon being a strict monogamist.

I was early innitiated into this important dispute, on which so many laborious volumes have been written. I published some tracts upon the subject myself, which, as they never sold, I have the consolation of thinking are read only by the happy Few. Some of my friends called this my weak side; but alas! they had not like me made it the subject of long contemplation. The more I reflected upon it, the more important it appeared. I even went a step beyond Whiston in displaying my principles: as he had engraven upon his wife's tomb that she was the only wife of William Whiston; so I wrote a similar epitaph for my wife, though still living, in which I extolled her prudence, œconomy, and obedience till death; and having got it copied fair, with an elegant frame, it was placed over the chimney-piece, where it answered several very useful purposes. It admonished my wife of her duty to me, and my fidelity to her; it inspired her with a passion for fame, and constantly put her in mind of her end.

It was thus, perhaps, from hearing marriage so often recommended, that my eldest son, just upon leaving college, fixed his affections upon the daughter of a neighbouring clergyman, who was a dignitary in the church, and in circumstances to give her a large fortune: but fortune was her smallest accomplishment. Miss Arabella Wilmot was allowed by all, except my two daughters, to be completely pretty. Her youth, health, and innocence, were still heightened by a complexion so transparent, and such an happy sensibility of look, as even age could not gaze on with indifference. As Mr.. Wilmot knew that I could make a very handsome settlement on my son, he was not averse to the match; so both families lived together in all that harmony which generally precedes an expected alliance. Being convinced by experience that the days of courtship are the most happy of our lives, I was willing enough to lengthen the period; and the various amusements which the young couple every day shared in each other's company, seemed to encrease their passion. We were generally awaked in the morning by music, and on fine days rode a hunting. The hours between breakfast and dinner the ladies devoted to dress and study: they usually read a page, and then gazed at themselves in the glass, which even philosophers might own often presented the page of greatest beauty. At dinner my wife took the lead; for as she always insisted upon carving every thing herself, it being her mother's way, she gave us upon these occasions the history of every dish. When we had dined, to prevent the ladies leaving us, I generally ordered the table to be removed; and sometimes, with the music master's assistance, the girls would give us a very agreeable concert. Walking out, drinking tea, country dances, and forfeits, shortened the rest of the day, without the assistance of cards, as I hated all manner of gaming, except backgammon, at which my old friend and I sometimes took a two-penny hit. Nor can I here pass over an ominous circumstance that happened the last time we played together: I only wanted to fling a quatre, and yet I threw deuce ace five times running.

Some months were elapsed in this manner, till at last it was thought convenient to fix a day for the nuptials of the young couple, who seemed earnestly to desire it. During the preparations for the wedding, I need not describe the busy importance of my wife, nor the sly looks of my daughters: in fact, my attention was fixed on another object, the completing a tract which I intended shortly to publish in defence of my favourite principle. As I looked upon this as a master-piece both for argument and style, I could not in the pride of my heart avoid shewing it to my old friend Mr. Wilmot, as I made no doubt of receiving his approbation; but not till too late I discovered that he was most violently attached to the contrary opinion, and with good reason; for he was at that time actually courting a fourth wife. This, as may be expected, produced a dispute attended with some acrimony, which threatened to interrupt our intended alliance: but on the day before that appointed for the ceremony, we agreed to discuss the subject at large.

It was managed with proper spirit on both sides: he asserted that I was heterodox, I retorted the charge: he replied, and I rejoined. In the mean time, while the controversy was hottest, I was called out by one of my relations, who, with a face of concern, advised me to give up the dispute, at least till my son's wedding was over. "How," cried I, "relinquish the cause of truth, and let him be an husband, already driven to the very verge of absurdity. You might as well advise me to give up my fortune as my argument." "Your fortune," returned my friend, "I am now sorry to inform you, is almost nothing. The merchant in town, in whose hands your money was lodged, has gone off, to avoid a statute of bankruptcy, and is thought not to have left a shilling in the pound. I was unwilling to shock you or the family with the account till after the wedding: but now it may serve to moderate your warmth in the argument; for, I suppose, your own prudence will enforce the necessity of dissembling at least till your son has the young lady's fortune secure."—"Well," returned I, "if what you tell me be true, and if I am to be a beggar, it shall never make me a rascal, or induce me to disavow my principles. I'll go this moment and inform the company of my circumstances; and as for the argument, I even here retract my former concessions in the old gentleman's favour, nor will I allow him now to be an husband in any sense of the expression."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Vicar of Wakefield by OLIVER GOLDSMITH, SUSAN L. RATTINER. Copyright © 2004 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

1. The description of the family of Wakefield; in which a kindred likeness prevails as well of minds as of persons 1
2. Family misfortunes. The loss of fortune only serves to encrease the pride of the worthy 3
3. A migration. The fortunate circumstances of our lives are generally found at last to be of our own procuring 6
4. A proof that even the humblest fortune may grant happiness, which depends not on circumstance, but constitution 11
5. A new and great acquaintance introduced. What we place most hopes upon generally proves most fatal 13
6. The happiness of a country fire-side 16
7. A town wit described. The dullest fellows may learn to be comical for a night or two 18
8. An amour, which promises little good fortune, yet may be productive of much 21
9. Two ladies of great distinction introduced. Superior finery ever seems to confer superior breeding 27
10. The family endeavours to cope with their betters. The miseries of the poor when they attempt to appear above their circumstances 29
11. The family still resolve to hold up their heads 32
12. Fortune seems resolved to humble the family of Wakefield. Mortifications are often more painful than real calamities 35
13. Mr. Burchell is found to be an enemy; for he has the confidence to give disagreeable advice 39
14. Fresh mortifications, or a demonstration that seeming calamities may be real blessings 41
15. All Mr. Burchell's villainy at once detected. The folly of being over-wise 45
16. The family use art, which is opposed with still greater 49
17. Scarce any virtue found to resist the power of long and pleasing temptation 52
18. The pursuit of a father to reclaim a lost child to virtue 58
19. The description of a person discontented with the present government, and apprehensive of the loss of our liberties 61
20. The history of a philosophic vagabond, pursuing novelty, but losing content 67
21. The short continuance of friendship amongst the vicious, which is coeval only with mutual satisfaction 76
22. Offences are easily pardoned where there is love at bottom 82
23. None but the guilty can be long and completely miserable 85
24. Fresh calamities 88
25. No situation, however wretched it seems, but has some sort of comfort attending it 91
26. A reformation in the gaol. To make laws complete, they should reward as well as punish 94
27. The same subject continued 97
28. Happiness and misery rather the result of prudence than of virtue in this life. Temporal evils or felicities being regarded by heaven as things merely in themselves trifling and unworthy its care in the distribution 100
29. The equal dealings of providence demonstrated with regard to the happy and the miserable here below. That from the nature of pleasure and pain, the wretched must be repaid the balance of their sufferings in the life hereafter 107
30. Happier prospects begin to appear. Let us be inflexible, and fortune will at last change in our favour 110
31. Former benevolence now repaid with unexpected interest 115
32. The Conclusion 125
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Customer Reviews

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( 19 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2000

    Good Triumphs

    A delightful tale of the calamities that beset an 18th century English vicar. The story is fast moving and told with wit and humor. The language is archaic but this adds to the charm of the story rather than being an annoyance.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2014

    The sample is seriously lacking

    Full disclosure: I have not yet read "The Vicar of Wakefield." I wanted to sample it before deciding to read it, so I took advantage of the Nook's free sample option to see if this might interest me. Barnes and Noble editions almost always have an introduction from an academic on the significance of the work to be presented. In the case of this novel, the introduction took up the entire sample, and like many of the Barnes and Noble introductions, contained many "plot spoilers" that defeated the purpose of reading the book in the first place. I strongly recommend that B & N make the introductions more along the lines of afterwords and let the sample be a sample of the novel and not some Ivory Tower lecture.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2013

    Vicar of Wakefield...great book!

    I like this book pretty well! It is quite interesting actually! I had to read it for school...like it so far!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2013

    Good Book

    I liked this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    Mediocre at it Mediocre at the intersection of boring avenue

    No gun scenes very cliche and poor vocabulary misused the word "it" "their" and "butt"- my 4 year old wyniquewah knows better than that- DONT READ UNLESS YOULL DIE IN AN ULTIMATUM WHEN THEY FORCE YOU TO READ IT




    LIVE LAUGH LOVE

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2011

    Okay

    It was a good short read. This copy didn't have that many errors that are found in free copies.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2000

    Humorous and Sad...

    'The Vicar of Wakefield' is a Humourous, but Sad book. This is the tale of an 18th century Vicar and his family and the hardships they have to face; the deaths int heir family, the kidnappings, the loss of their small fortune are turned into nearly comical insidents with Oliver Goldsmith's language which turns from sarcastic to serious, from sad to angry. It is a truly delightful book and as I read it when I was eleven years of age I would recommend it to anyone of that age and up, but it depends oin your readoing level.

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    Posted July 28, 2011

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