Vicious Circle (Persephone Alcmedi Series #1)

( 68 )

Overview

A girl's got to do what a girl's got to do....

Being a witch doesn't pay the bills, but Persephone Alcmedi gets by between reading Tarot cards, writing her syndicated newspaper column, and kenneling werewolves in the basement when the moon is full — even if witches aren't supposed to mingle with wolves. She really reaches the end of her leash, though, when her grandmother gets kicked out of the nursing home and Seph finds herself in the doghouse about some things she's written. ...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback)
$7.19
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$7.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (53) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $3.48   
  • Used (43) from $1.99   
Vicious Circle (Persephone Alcmedi Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

A girl's got to do what a girl's got to do....

Being a witch doesn't pay the bills, but Persephone Alcmedi gets by between reading Tarot cards, writing her syndicated newspaper column, and kenneling werewolves in the basement when the moon is full — even if witches aren't supposed to mingle with wolves. She really reaches the end of her leash, though, when her grandmother gets kicked out of the nursing home and Seph finds herself in the doghouse about some things she's written. Then her werewolf friend Lorrie is murdered...and the high priestess of an important coven offers Seph big money to destroy the killer, a powerful vampire named Goliath Kline. Seph is a tough girl, but this time she bites off more than she can chew. She needs a little help from her friends — werewolf friends. One of those friends, Johnny, the motorcycle-riding lead singer for the techno-metal-Goth band Lycanthropia, has a crush on her. And while Seph has always been on edge around this 6'2" leather-clad hunk, she's starting to realize that although their attraction may be dangerous, nothing could be as lethal as the showdown that awaits them.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I enjoyed every moment. It's a rare book that gives you a protagonist you'd like to actually be friends with." — Tanya Huff, bestselling author of the Blood books
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439154281
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Publication date: 6/30/2009
  • Series: Persephone Alcmedi Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 706,863
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda Robertson is the mother of four wonderful boys, owns three electric guitars, and is followed around by a big dog named after Bela Lugosi. Once upon a time she was a lead guitarist in a heavy metal cover band and has worked as a graphic artist. She still composes and creates art, when time permits. Linda currently writes and rocks in northeast Ohio. Visit her at AuthorLindaRobertson.com and @authorLinda.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

Half past six A.M. A ruggedly handsome man...Arthur, yes, Arthur...held me in his strong arms, gazing into my eyes with sensitivity and understanding and desire, and he was about to kiss me, and —

The sound of the garage door opening ruined my perfectly romantic dream. Blissful slumber broken, I shot out of bed ready to defend my home.

With a baseball bat in my white- knuckled grip, I eased an erratic path — to avoid the squeaky spots — down the stairs. I crept toward the kitchen; the eastern windows were still dark. Ahead, a door on the right connected the house to the garage. I could hear someone starting up the steps out there.

Holding my breath, I hefted the bat.

The door opened.

"Damn wærewolves dumping Krispy Kreme boxes on the lawn."

"Nana." I sighed, relaxing and lowering the bat. I slipped it behind the door.

She didn't even glance my way as she stepped in with the newspaper and a ragged- looking pastry box. Grass blades clung to her pink fuzzy slippers. The paperboy must have missed the driveway again.

She'd just moved in yesterday, so I wasn't used to her being here yet. Clearly, an eighty-four-year-old woman didn't need as much sleep as I expected.

With a Marlboro pinched in the corner of her mouth, she shuffled across the kitchen and asked, "So you get up early nowadays, Persephone?"

I snorted. "No. And I didn't know that you stopped sleeping in."

"Well, as a matter of fact, the crack of dawn is my new alarm clock."

"You're still early."

"Blame the nurses," Nana said. Then she muttered, "They act like it's a boarding school. Get up. Take your medicine. Eat. Exercise. Play bingo. I'm paying for it, I should get to sleep and smoke whenever I want." She grumbled all the way to the trash can, where she shook the doughnut box hard enough to make its cellophane top crackle. "This sat out there for at least two goddamned days, you know." This time she spoke louder, so I knew she was talking to me.

"I've been busy," I said, "moving your things from Woodhaven." Mentioning the moving reminded me my muscles were sore. The rude awakening and my tense acts of stealth hadn't helped.

She looked at me and frowned, but I wasn't sure if her dour expression was due to my words or my choice of pajamas — lavender panties and a cutoff purple tank top with the words Round Table Groupie in ancient-style letters on a shield. It's an accurate description. I've seen every movie and documentary ever made about Arthur Pendragon and amassed a collection of books and artwork based on Arthurian legends. No artist or actor has ever come close to capturing Arthur the way my dreams have, though. Funny that.

Nana tsk-tsked.

"Where's your nightgown?"

I had a flashback of the long flannel gowns she'd made me to sleep in as a child. They were straight out of " 'Twas the Night Before Christmas." I wondered if, in her youth, she'd won a lifetime membership to a secret club called Clothiers for the Frumpy Woman. "These are my pajamas."

"That's all you sleep in?"

"I lived alone until yesterday, Nana, so what I sleep in hasn't been an issue." Still, the cold October air swirling in made me wish I were wearing my robe. I shut the door she'd left open.

Nana shoved the pastry box into the trash. Little pieces of cut grass cascaded to the kitchen floor. "Damn filthy animals anyway." As she shuffled back to me, her hand smoothed priggishly up and over her mound of white hair. I knew what was coming next. I would have mocked her as she said it, but she was looking right at me. "Witches and wolves aren't meant to mingle." Nana still held to the old adage from long before the public emergence of other-than-human communities.

"Stop it," I said. "They're my friends."

She took the cigarette from her lips and blew smoke up at the ceiling, then pointed the ash-end at the box in the trash can. "Some friends."

I gave her an apathetic look and put my hands on my hips. I had started this day ready for a fight.

"They obviously don't think much of you," Nana added. She turned down the hallway.

That wasn't true. "I can't help that you don't like wæres. You're entitled to your own opinions, but don't expect me to feel the same way."

She snorted.

I suddenly realized that I had picked up that rude response from her.

Nana shuffled from the kitchen into the dining room, then into the living room, newspaper still folded under her arm. "To them, you're just some weirdo version of a confessional priest."

Despite being fully aware I was being baited, I followed her. Not because I wanted a fight; I really didn't. But I also didn't back down when someone picked a fight with me. I felt compelled to stop this now, before it became a routine. I'd been forced to listen to her spout her anti-wære opinion repeatedly during my years growing up in her house. Now, well, this was my house.

I stopped in the doorway. My old saltbox farmhouse was decorated in an eclectic attempt at Victorian. The living room — with its deep-red walls, stone hearth, and bookshelves filled with everything I own on Arthur — was my sanctuary. Posters of Camelot-themed paintings by John William Waterhouse, Sir Frank Dicksee, and other artists hung in big black-and-old frames. This was usually a soothing room for me, but not this morning. "Confessional priest? What's that supposed to mean?"

She waved me off, then answered anyway. "You kennel them, alleviating their consciences so they can 'go on.' " Despite the pseudo-drama she added to the last two words, she might have sounded somewhat sage-like but for her verbal stumbling over the word "consciences" — adding a few more syllables than needed. In an attempt to recover, she quickly added, "Besides, friends don't leave arbage on your lawn. Real friends are more respectful than that."

Nana's slippers had tracked cut grass through my house. Sore muscles made me cranky. I snarled, "I'd have thought that family, more so than friends, should be respectful."

"They should."

"You're not."

She turned. "What?"

I pointed at the floor. "You're dropping grass garbage all over my house."

"Where?" she demanded again, squinting at the floor.

There was nothing wrong with her eyes, but she wasn't above feigning elderly ailments when it benefited her.

I strode back to the kitchen and fetched the little broom and dustpan, thinking that at least I'd only have to mow for a few more weeks. Of course, I'd be spending the next few months mopping up melted-snow tracks instead.

After I dumped the debris in the trash can, I shot a glare through the dining room and into the living room where Nana sat. Nana was safe from my glare, hidden behind the newspaper. She had parked herself in my cozy chair. It didn't help my mood to realize that it would now be her cozy chair.

"You have a valid point," I said, returning to the living room, "but I don't mind if my friends are negligent with a doughnut box. They're responsible enough to kennel themselves on full moons. That matters more to me, and it should count for something to you."

"Right. It counts for something. It counts for them being stupid. Wolves change on full moons; witches raise nergies and cast spells on full moons. Why they would ant to be anywhere near you during a full moon is beyond comprehension."

"That's the only time it's safe! They're already going to change!"

The phone rang. I jumped, then hurried to the kitchen to answer it. A glance at the clock above the old olive-colored stove told me it wasn't even seven yet. Calls this early usually weren't good news. "Hello?"

A formal female voice said, "Persephone Alcmedi, please."

I was immediately worried: the caller pronounced both of my names right the first time. A rare thing. I hoped it wasn't the administrator from the nursing home. They had told me to expect a delay and several headaches getting Nana's Social Security routed back to her and, before coffee, I just wasn't ready to think as hard as the admin was going to want me to. "Who, may I ask, is calling me at six-forty-three in the morning?"

"Vivian Diamond."

I knew of her — definitely not someone affiliated with the nursing home. She was the high priestess of the only Cleveland coven officially endorsed by the Witch Elders Council, or WEC. Vivian's name-dropping social style didn't impress me, and her manner of leadership tended to snub true practitioners in favor of schmoozing the deep-pocketed wannabes. Consequently, I didn't attend the meet-ups or open rituals she held. I did just fine out here in Ohio's farmlands as a solitary.

"I apologize for calling so early," she said, her voice just a bit nasal, "but I need your help. Your name was recommended."

"Recommended by whom?"

She paused. "Lorrie Kordell."

Lorrie used to kennel here on full moons, but had moved closer to Cleveland for work. She was raising her daughter, Beverley, single-handed and single-incomed. I wondered how they were doing. Since Lorrie had found a place in the city to kennel, I missed the popcorn and Disney nights with Beverley. (Crunchy food and musical comedies covered up the sounds of the kenneled wæres nicely.) "How are you acquainted with Lorrie?"

"Who is it, Seph?" Nana called.

I hit the mute button and yelled back, "It's for me, Nana!" Was she going to pry into everything?

"She recently joined my coven," Vivian said.

Shocked, I didn't answer. This was what Nana had meant. Wærewolves avoided magic rituals at all costs. The energies raised could cause partial body-shifts — usually of the head and arms — but the mind suffered more than the body. During a partial shift, the wære-mind could devour the human- mind, leaving only a maddened, murderous beast. By law, police could kill on sight any wære in a non-full moon partial transformation.

"Miss Alcmedi?"

"I'm here."

"Miss Alcmedi?"

I undid the mute. "I'm here."

"I'd like to meet with you. Today. Early, if possible."

"Let me check my calendar." Pulling my John William Waterhouse day planner from my purse under the phone stand, I flipped through the pages. It took effort not to fall into daydreaming over the artwork, but I dutifully scanned the appointment lines. The only notation was column due 3 p.m. on yesterday's date. I'd met the deadline a day early. A few Tarot readings for regular customers were penciled in for later in the week, but no appointments had been formalized, so my schedule was clear. Reading a high priestess's cards could lead to a larger Tarot clientele. The extra money would help me offset the cost of a live-in Nana.

"What would be a good time and place for you?" I asked. Keeping Nana from crossing paths with clients would be better for all concerned.

"The coffee shop on East Ninth, about four blocks from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Say, one hour?"

Damn. She was seriously urgent. "I can just make it, unless traffic turns into a nightmare." I knew of her, but not what she looked like. "How will I know you?"

"Oh, don't worry. I'll know you." She hung up.

I hated it when people didn't say a closing before hanging up. And she'd know me? How? I returned the phone to the cradle charger. When I turned, Nana stood in the wide doorway staring at me.

Her wrinkled face was expressionless. If I hadn't known she'd always been that way, I might have thought all the wrinkles were hiding a reaction. "Who's dead?" she asked.

"Nobody's dead."

"People don't call this early unless someone died in the night." She paused. "Or do your 'friends' do that crap too?"

"The phone rings, Nana, and I answer it. Sometimes it's my friends and sometimes — "

"Fine."

Having her here was going to be like raising a spoiled teenager. She was going to roll her eyes, cut me off, and act like I was inferior.

She shoved a folded section of newspaper at me. "I'm done with this part." She turned and shuffled past the big oak dining table, pudgy hands rising to smooth over her dome of white hair.

The gesture reminded me I hadn't written her weekly hair appointment in my datebook. She insisted on keeping her hair in a beehive style, so it was more like maintenance than hairdressing. (For a good portion of my childhood I thought her head was shaped funny. When I eventually realized it was all done with curlers and hairspray, it diminished her scariness.) I put the newspaper down, grabbed a pen, and jotted the appointment in.

As I finished writing, the paper's front-page headline jumped out at me: Woman Found Dead. Underneath, in smaller letters: Authorities suspect cult involvement. Scanning the picture, I recognized the face of a crying young girl being restrained by medics, hands reaching toward the sheet-covered body on a stretcher. The girl was Beverley Kordell, Lorrie's daughter.

Copyright © 2009 by Linda Robertson

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 68 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(28)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 68 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    On the Fence About This One Review brought to you by OBS staff

    On the Fence About This One

    Review brought to you by OBS staff member Verushka

    There is nothing more hilarious than seeing a name spelled like “Gavyn” in an urban fantasy novel. It reeks of someone trying too hard to make a character stand out and more often than not plays out like an overbearing mother trying too hard to make her kid unique.

    Then there are names like Persephone Isis Alcmedi, a mouthful I would pity any child having. However, we meet Seph as she is called in this book as an adult, a pagan witch who is currently living with her grandmother, Demeter and their great Dane puppy Ares, formerly known as Poopsie. No really. Seph’s is named for the Greek Queen of the Underworld, Persephone and Isis, the Greek Goddess of motherhood, magic and fertility, not to mention a friend of slaves, sinners and the downtrodden. Wikipedia tells me, she listened to the rich as well. This makes for an interesting combination for Seph, who lives up to both her names – she is a friend to werewolves, kenneling those that trust her through their monthly change, and an instrument of vengeance in the same breath. It is that which makes up much of the book.

    She isn’t particularly bloodthirsty, but she has a streak of justice a mile wide, something Vivian Diamond, a witch is counting on when she comes to Seph to find the killer of Lorrie, a werewolf she was helping. Lorrie, a close friend of Seph, who kenneled with her, moved away some time before the book begins and Seph had lost touch with her and her daughter, Beverly. But not before Lorrie had come to her for help with a stalker that Seph claims she accidentally killed through much of the book. Vivian wants to know who killed Lorrie, wants the killer taken care of and what follows is a well thought out case, that is designed to shed light on Seph, and her links with the others – werewolves, vamps and witches within this world.

    Seph isn’t a vigilante in this, she merely wants to help set right the wrongs she sees. Despite her taking the case of finding Lorrie’s killer and promising Vivian the vengeance she seeks, I never got the feeling that Seph was as bloodthirsty as that agreement suggested. She is a character that wants to help, that writes columns on the unfair treatment of werewolves in hospitals and normal society, something which plays a lot into this book.

    By the end of the book, thanks to the werewolves she surrounds herself with, and her heritage, on her father’s side (who she’s never known) she discovers something unique about herself that explains her desire for justice and her reticence in doing whatever to achieve it. It’s the beginning of a interesting battle for her, within herself, and one that isn’t easy. Or so I hope...

    I am still on the fence about this book for some reason – it’s engaging, well thought out with a likeable female heroine, who has some struggles ahead of her that I can appreciate. I’m hoping it’s first-bookitis, where in the main purpose of the book is to set up a world, and it is one of the hardest ones to write in a series I think. It’s worth picking up the second novel in this series though.

    See the full review and more at openbooksociety dot com

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    how many times can you use the word and in one sentence?

    how many times can you use the word and in one sentence?

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 13, 2011

    Witches, Werewolves and Vampires...Oh My!

    This book was pretty good. I mean, it wasn't exactly what I was expecting, but overall, I'd still say it was good. I think I originally picked up this book because of the cover (it fit with one of my challenges) and because the synopsis sounded fantastic. In my opinion, it didn't live up to the promises of the synopsis, but nonetheless enjoyable.


    I keep going over and over my feelings for this book trying to figure out why I felt the way I did. I mean, the storyline was pretty good, so what it really comes down to, for me, was the writing and the main character. The writing wasn't my favorite. Not that it was really bad or anything, but it confused me some of the time. There were so many new terms that were not explained and you had to kind of figure it out along the way, it was frustrating. I think because the terms would pop up and you'd be like did they already tell me what this was? I kept scrolling back in the book to see if I'd missed something. I will say this about the writing though, it got better as I read and I didn't feel the need to put the book down at all which is always a good sign. By the end of the book, the writing felt better to me.


    As for the main character, Persephone, she annoyed me. Not all the time mind you, but a lot of the time she just annoyed me. I don't think I could understand her a ton. She seemed so embarrassed of who she was to anyone who was human. It was like she had 2 personalities. Looking back now, I think the author did that on purpose, but throughout the book I kept palming my forehead and thinking really Persephone, are you really that big of a shallow idiot!! Granted, I think a lot of the time she really was *palms forehead* I am a girl, and I don't think I will ever understand my own race...

    But, there were a lot of redeeming qualities in the book. For one, it had a twisted plot. I kept trying to guess what was going to happen next all the way up until the end. Also, I really liked Persephone's Nana and the male werewolf hottie, Johnny. Now, as all you readers know, I'm a victim of The Bad Boy Complex and Johnny really fits into that. I think, maybe a lot of that was the tattoos and piercings and his genius at innuendos (I've got a knack for those), but he kept me reading and I wanted to get in as much of him as possible. As for Nana, I always like an old woman who may appear weak but can bust out the moves when necessary. I believe, wholeheartedly, that Nana fit that picture. Yeah, she was pesky and sneaky at times, but it fit her character terribly well.

    All that being said, I will definitely be reading the sequel for a couple reasons. First of all, I think that Robertson's writing is going to be so much better in the next book, I could just feel it (I'm a dork...). Plus, now that I know all the jacked up terms from the first book, I shouldn't be so confused. Secondly (or is that thirdly?), at the end of book one, Persephone has a kind of epiphany so I think I've grown to understand her a lot better. I'm hoping that she won't annoy me as much anymore. Last of all (which kind of nicks the "couple" statement), I want some more Johnny and I'm very curious to see what happens with the vampires I met towards the end of the book.

    So, I guess what I'm saying, is that this may not be the best book I've read, but I'd say it was worth it and I'm hankering for the sequel soon which I think will be way better than the first. *crosses fingers* I'll keep ya posted!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Walk Softly but Carry a Big Stick.'er Stake...

    Imagine you are witch just minding your own witchy business. And then imagine that you are drawn neck deep into a murder, are conned into taking a hit out on a vampire (and haven't the foggiest on how to "off" someone), and housing one very sexy rock n' roll waerewolf. All with your elderly crabby nana nipping at your heels, a ciggy ever present at her lips. Such is the case of Linda Robertson's Vicious Circle. Robertson gently clubs you over the head with a thrilling read.


    One of the things that make Persephone Alcmedi so appealing is that she is not an overtly powerful character-at least not right off the bat. That doesn't mean that she doesn't have some serious clout. Rather Robertson has hammered her into a gentle but very resilient witch. She's not the bad ass that rolls into town on a motorcycle with a rifle strapped to her back. But she definitely does rise to the occasion when it is needed. Here we have a character who for all intents and purposes, is virtually clueless about the supernatural world outside of her own sphere.


    As a solitary, but hereditary witch with significant power, and a few waerewolf friends to call her own, life was pretty simple. Readers get to journey with Seph as she learns that she is capable of so much more and an astounding destiny awaits her as the Lustrata. The reader is drawn to this as the character develops. And as for Menessos.woo-wee..Robertson has spared no expense in drawing him. As much as Johnny will give everyone a rock n' roll heartache, Menessos is definitely the one to watch. He will make you pant for more.


    Robertson has all the cues, all the required ingredients to make a hot pot of chili and she is quite the cooker so far, but let's ratchet up the pace of the plot, toss in some more cayenne (just a smidge), and set the burner to simmer and you'll have one heck of a firecracker. This series has great potential and I will definitely be reading more of Linda Robertson!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2009

    Great read!

    A fast-paced, fun read with compelling characters and plenty of plot twists to keep the reader guessing. I devoured this book...can't wait for the sequel! Wonderful for fans of urban fantasy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is an amusing lighthearted chick lit urban fantasy

    Persephone "Seph" Alcmedi is a witch, but pays her bills with other paranormal practices like reading tarot cards and writing a newspaper column. Seph also breaks the rules of witch-hood and the city ordinance by running a kennel in her basement to keep werewolves out of trouble during the full moon. Everyone knows the Were and witches are like an oilman and a tree hugger.

    Seph is outraged when her grandma is kicked to the curb by her nursing home management. She puts that on hold when a vampire kills her were-friend Lorrie Kordell. She is offered a hell of a lot cash to bring the bloody killer to justice. However, the predator Goliath Kline is too dangerous for a mere witch to restrain so she turns to Johnny the lead singer of techno-metal-Goth band Lycanthropia, who has more than a crush on her; a feeling she reciprocates though she hides it from the biker using grandma as her heart guard.

    This is an amusing lighthearted chick lit urban fantasy that stars a female David witch struggling with her bills, grandma, and Johnny battling Goliath the invincible cruel vampire; Vegas would never allow betting on this one. The story line is breezy from the onset as a frustrated Persephone wishes her kennel guests would keep the Krispy Kreme boxes off her lawn before the neighbors howl about her garbage and never slows down. Fans will appreciate this jocular tale in which the plot is never quite serious as the kennel master witch turns amateur sleuth leading to a showdown with a vampire who will enjoy drinking bewitching blood.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Loved this book, I read it and bought all the rest of the series

    Loved this book, I read it and bought all the rest of the series the next day.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2013

    Good read very enjoyable.

    Good read very enjoyable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 31, 2012

    The world needs to get ready to deal with things it always dismi

    The world needs to get ready to deal with things it always dismissed as myths, werewolf, witches, fairies, and vampires are real, so deal with it. Persephone is a witch, and in her life time all the truths have been revealed but her own. She is friends with Werewolves, and kennels them during the phase of the moon that causes them the most problems. She is finding that after college life has brought many changes including her Nana needing to move back in with her. She has started a column on Werewolves and their problems both social, and societal. She is the voice for her friends and thinks that she has everything in hand, she could not be more wrong. This is a good story, with an interesting mythology, with history and legend behind the story that gives it an actual worldly feel. A great beginning to a interesting series that I will continue to explore.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2012

    Love it!

    This book was very pleasing to read and put me in the mind of the greats in this genre like kim harrison, charlaine harris, patricia briggs, and jeanine frost. Being from the nearby vicinity from where the book takes place it was fun finding bits of home in it too, like my favorite Starbucks. I love that its base is not just generic for the magick portions but that the main charecter has deep roots in Greek mythology, but the series as a whole takes in all Magick culturesas partof its whole. This is what a book series about a witch should be, fantastic and a bit unreal in its premise to spark our imaginations, yet rooted truly in the reality of paganistic belief structures. Wonderful!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2012

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 11, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Brought to you by OBS reviewer Verushka There is nothing more h

    Brought to you by OBS reviewer Verushka

    There is nothing more hilarious than seeing a name spelled like “Gavyn” in an urban fantasy novel. It reeks of someone trying too hard to make a character stand out and more often than not plays out like an overbearing mother trying too hard to make her kid unique.

    Then there are names like Persephone Isis Alcmedi, a mouthful I would pity any child having. However, we meet Seph as she is called in this book as an adult, a pagan witch who is currently living with her grandmother, Demeter and their great Dane puppy Ares, formerly known as Poopsie. No really. Seph’s is named for the Greek Queen of the Underworld, Persephone and Isis, the Greek Goddess of motherhood, magic and fertility, not to mention a friend of slaves, sinners and the downtrodden. Wikipedia tells me, she listened to the rich as well. This makes for an interesting combination for Seph, who lives up to both her names – she is a friend to werewolves, kenneling those that trust her through their monthly change, and an instrument of vengeance in the same breath. It is that which makes up much of the book.

    She isn’t particularly bloodthirsty, but she has a streak of justice a mile wide, something Vivian Diamond, a witch is counting on when she comes to Seph to find the killer of Lorrie, a werewolf she was helping. Lorrie, a close friend of Seph, who kenneled with her, moved away some time before the book begins and Seph had lost touch with her and her daughter, Beverly. But not before Lorrie had come to her for help with a stalker that Seph claims she accidentally killed through much of the book. Vivian wants to know who killed Lorrie, wants the killer taken care of and what follows is a well thought out case, that is designed to shed light on Seph, and her links with the others – werewolves, vamps and witches within this world.

    Seph isn’t a vigilante in this, she merely wants to help set right the wrongs she sees. Despite her taking the case of finding Lorrie’s killer and promising Vivian the vengeance she seeks, I never got the feeling that Seph was as bloodthirsty as that agreement suggested. She is a character that wants to help, that writes columns on the unfair treatment of werewolves in hospitals and normal society, something which plays a lot into this book.

    By the end of the book, thanks to the werewolves she surrounds herself with, and her heritage, on her father’s side (who she’s never known) she discovers something unique about herself that explains her desire for justice and her reticence in doing whatever to achieve it. It’s the beginning of a interesting battle for her, within herself, and one that isn’t easy. Or so I hope.

    There is a wealth of supporting characters here, some which suffer because of the sheer number. That doesn’t detract from those that get the author’s attention – Johnny, a werewolf, and love interest, Demeter her grandmother and Beverly, Lorrie’s kid – are the main supporting cast that shape who Seph is in this book, with the ending promising a different set in future novels.

    I am still on the fence about this book for some reason – it’s engaging, well thought out with a likeable female heroine, who has some struggles ahead of her that I can appreciate. I’m hoping it’s first-bookitis, where in the main purpose of the book is to set up a world, and it is one of the hardest ones to write in a series I think. It’s worth picking up the second novel in this series though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    Excellent Read

    Interesting plot and characters. Kept me reading way past bedtime. Just got the second book in this series and now my weekend is set!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 27, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Persephone and Johnny- a Fairie Stalk Mother's point of View

    I've always stood my ground when someone asks me to recommend a book to them and yet again Linda has given me more reason to blurt her name out to people. Even perfect strangers in the book store. Another winning novel!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Slow Start....

    The book started really slow in the beginning. Once you past about 50-100 pages it starts getting better. I couldn't get enough after that and was saddened to see it end. A great start for a series.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Viciously-Creative and Wicked start to a New Urban Fantasy Series!

    This book started off a bit slow but quickly accumulated speed and never stopped. Persephone is a witch living in a world where preternaturals are all out of the closet and fighting for survival among judgmental humans. Humans are predictable as always; prejudice and holier-than-thou until they get enough exposure to whatever frightens them that they stop caring or just accept the situation. The preternaturals set in this world, are persecuted to the extent that clear crimes against them go intentionally unsolved or blatantly ignored by human law enforcement. When Seph's waerewolf friend Lorrie is murdered in a ritualistic fashion, she is propositioned to find the killer and secretly execute them. Seph appears clearly out of her league when she realizes the killer might be a powerful vampire. Seph, never one to opt out or back down, invokes all the strength she can muster and enlists the aid of her waere friends to help her dole out vengeance. But how do you snare and trap a vampire that has the advantage of age-old wisdom, the sense of entitlement and superiority and can spot a scheme and connive a mile away? I really enjoyed this book and its clear humor. Seph is a witchy-heroine that you can believe in. She is brave and not afraid to take chances to protect the weak or her loved ones. I highly recommend this book and look forward to the next book in the series Hallowed Circle due out 12/29/09.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Couldn't put it down...

    I enjoyed this book immensely! For a first novel, this author did a outstanding job. I always enjoy adding a new author to my list and I'm definitely looking forward to the next novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2009

    Fast Read

    This book was exactly what I'd hope it'd be. A fast, entertaining read. I read it in two days. I could barely put it down. The characters were engaging without being two-dimensional or hackneyed; their depth was unexpected. The pace was relentless. I loved the chain-smoking Nana and the guitar-playing Johnny. It's not Shakespeare, and it's not trying to be, but it was still tailored from quality writing. Even though it's an entertaining read, the penmanship was superior to a lot of other books in this genre; nice symbolism, occcasional poetic prose, mastery of description. This book makes itself noteworthy in its category.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 68 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)