Victims and Victimisation: A Reader / Edition 1

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Overview

Victimology is an important area of study in criminology as an academic subject, but is also taken seriously by governments and agencies in their assessment of criminal behaviour and their policies on crime. Victimology

addresses questions such as:

  • Why are certain people or groups of people victims of crime?
  • Why do some crimes go unreported?
  • Why do victims respond in the way that they do?
  • What can the state do to stop certain groups becoming victims?
  • How can victims be supported following a crime?

This reader brings together some of the classic readings in criminology, dating back to the origins of victimology as a subject during the 1940s. It also includes more recent articles which examine newer issues in victimology

such as corporate crime, state crime and religious effects and implications on the subject. The book also explores the ongoing development of policy and theories of victimology.

Victims and Victimisation: A Reader brings together, for the first time, these classic and contemporary readings in criminology. It also includes an editorial introduction to the volume and an introduction to each thematic section. It provides key reading for students of criminology, law and sociology.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780335225262
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/1/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 392
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian Williams was Professor of Community Justice and Victimology at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. He served on the Executive of the British Society of Criminology and was a volunteer training officer for a local Victim Support scheme. Brian died in 2007 but his influence on the field of victimology lives on through his work.

Hannah Goodman Chong is Research Fellow in community justice at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.

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Table of Contents

About the writers
Publisher’s acknowledgements
Dedication and introduction
Series editor’s introduction

PART 1
The development of the discipline
Introduction by Brian Williams
1.1 Hans von Hentig: The Criminal and his victim: studies in the sociobiology of crime
1.2 Michael J. Hindelang: Toward a theory of personal criminal victimization

PART 2
Vulnerable victims and critical responses
Introduction by Hannah Goodman Chong
2.1 Gwyneth Boswell: Child victims
2.2 B. Bowling: Violent racism: victimization, policing and social context
2.3 Jon Garland and Neil Chakraborti: Recognising and responding to victims of rural racism
2.4 Jan Jordan: Worlds apart? Women, rape and the policereporting process
2.5 Christopher Williams: Vulnerable victims? A currentawareness of the victimisation of people with learning difficulties

PART 3
Religion, spirituality, work with, and research on, victims
Introduction by Basia Spalek
3.1 Nawal H. Ammar: Restorative justice in Islam: theory and practice
3.2 Mark S. Umbreit: Humanistic mediation: a transformativejourney of peacemaking

PART 4
Corporate crime and state crime victims
Introduction by Sandra Walklate
4.1 S. Box: Corporate crime kills
4.2 J. Braithwaite: Responsive regulation
4.3 David Kauzlarich, Rick A. Matthews and William J. Miller: Toward a victimology of state crime

PART 5
The conceptual and theoretical basis of victimology
Introduction by Joanna Shapland
5.1 Anna Alvazzi del Frate: The voice of victims of crime:estimating the true level of conventional crime
5.2 Andrew Ashworth: Responsibilities, rights and restorative justice
5.3 Edna Erez and Linda Rogers: Victim impact statements and sentencing outcomes and processes: the perspectives of legal professionals
5.4 Joanna Shapland: Fiefs and peasants: accomplishing change for victims in the criminal justice system

PART 6
Mainstream victimology
Introduction by Sandra Walklate
6.1 Jo Goodey: Promoting ‘good practice’ in sex trafficking cases
6.2 Glennys Howarth and Paul Rock: Aftermath and theconstruction of victimisation: ‘the other victims of crime’
6.3 Ian O’Donnell and Kimmett Edgar: Routine victimisation in prisons

Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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