Victorian Domesticity: Families in the Life and Art of Louisa May Alcott

Victorian Domesticity: Families in the Life and Art of Louisa May Alcott

by Charles Strickland
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The subject of Victorian Domesticity is family life in America. The life and works of Louisa May Alcott served as the vehicle for exploring and analyzing this subject. Although Alcott was deeply influenced by popular currents of sentimentality, her own experience exposed her to the confusions and contradictions generated when sentiment confronted the reality

…  See more details below

Overview

The subject of Victorian Domesticity is family life in America. The life and works of Louisa May Alcott served as the vehicle for exploring and analyzing this subject. Although Alcott was deeply influenced by popular currents of sentimentality, her own experience exposed her to the confusions and contradictions generated when sentiment confronted the reality of life in 19th-century America.

In the first chapter Strickland outlines the ways in which sentimentality colored the perception of 19th-century Americans about such issues as courtship, marriage, the relationship between the sexes, generational relationships, and the relationship between the nuclear family and the community outside the family. Chapters two and three trace Alcott’s childhood and adolescent experiences, exploring the tensions that developed between Louisa and her father, and detailing the ways in which she carried the double burden of being both poor and female as she sought her identity as a writer.

The following six chapters treat the varieties of family life that appear in Alcott’s stories, the impact of feminism on her life, and her emphasis on the importance of child nurture. In the final two chapters the author treats the relationships that Alcott perceived between the family and the world around it and assesses the legacy of the Victorian family idea.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Strickland contends that the confrontation between Alcott's own experience of ``sentimental'' family life and the ``reality of life in nineteenth century America'' generated the materials of both her domestic and melodramatic fiction, including the neglected ``adult'' novels Moods and Work. His interesting readings of Alcott's fiction would have benefitted from a recognition of the immense debt she owed to Wilkie Collins and Charlotte Yonge. The book falters on Strickland's curious identification of the term ``sentimental revolution'' with transformations in early 19th-century thought about marriage and child nurture. By trivializing as ``sentimental'' humanitarian and philosophical currents in European thought from Locke to Rousseau and beyond which recognized the rights of infants and the importance of a child's early years, Strickland makes Alcott into a far more original and yet far more parochial figure than she was. Barbara J. Dunlap, City Coll. Lib, CUNY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780817302375
Publisher:
University of Alabama Press
Publication date:
09/28/1985
Pages:
240
Lexile:
1530L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Charles Strickland is Associate Professor of History, Emory University.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >