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The Victorian Town Child
     

The Victorian Town Child

by Pamela Horn
 

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As nineteenth-century Britain became increasingly urbanized and industrialized, the number of children living in towns grew rapidly. At the same time, Horn considers the increasing divisions within urban society, not only between market towns and major manufacturing and trading centers, but within individual towns, as rich and poor became more segregated.

During

Overview

As nineteenth-century Britain became increasingly urbanized and industrialized, the number of children living in towns grew rapidly. At the same time, Horn considers the increasing divisions within urban society, not only between market towns and major manufacturing and trading centers, but within individual towns, as rich and poor became more segregated.

During the Victorian period, public attitudes toward children and childhood shifted dramatically, often to the detriment of those at the lower end of the social scale—including paupers and juvenile delinquents. Drawing on original research, including anecdotes, first-hand accounts, and a wealth of photographs, The Victorian Town Child describes in detail the changing lives of all classes of Victorian town children, from those of prosperous business and professional families to working-class families, where unemployment and overcrowding were particular problems. Horn also examines the issues of juvenile labor and exploitation, how factory work and education were combined, how crime and punishment were dealt with among children, and the changes in health and infant death rates over the period.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Examines the lives of urban children of the period, in the context of increasing divisions in urban society between rich and poor. Looks especially at widening of legislative regulation and control with regard to paupers and juvenile delinquents, the formation of charitable organizations, and the influence of imperialism and patriotism on concern for children's welfare. Examines issues of juvenile labor and exploitation, the combination of education and factory work, and how the justice system dealt with young offenders. Includes material from first-hand accounts, and b&w photos. Distributed by Books International. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780814735756
Publisher:
New York University Press
Publication date:
12/01/1997
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.87(d)

Meet the Author

Pamela Horn is the author of more than ten books on nineteenth-and twentieth-century England, including Women in the 1920s, and a frequent contributor to journals such as The Times Literary Supplement and the Labour History Review. She lives in England.

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