Victory Stolen

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Overview

David Earl Henard received his commission as a second lieutenant signal officer in the US Army upon his graduation from the University of Missouri of Rolla with a BS in electrical engineering in August 1965. His service as a helicopter pilot with the 25th Aviation Battalion, 25th Infantry Division in Vietnam began in July 1967 and ended in June 1968. After a nine-month assignment near Warrington, England, as the aviation detachment commander and battalion signal officer, when he married Gail, he began civilian ...

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More About This Book

Overview

David Earl Henard received his commission as a second lieutenant signal officer in the US Army upon his graduation from the University of Missouri of Rolla with a BS in electrical engineering in August 1965. His service as a helicopter pilot with the 25th Aviation Battalion, 25th Infantry Division in Vietnam began in July 1967 and ended in June 1968. After a nine-month assignment near Warrington, England, as the aviation detachment commander and battalion signal officer, when he married Gail, he began civilian life as a graduate assistant and student at the University of Illinois. His work there led him into computer programming and systems development, leading to an assignment as the assistant director for systems development at the University of Illinois, Urbana. He was hired as the computer services director at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Illinois, beginning in 1980. He retired from EIU as the associate vice president for information technology services in 2000 to join his wife Gail as a part-time missionary and as a stock trader. The two have served in various humanitarian jobs in Scotland; Juarez, Mexico; and Central Asia. This is his story about the Tet Offensive, where the 25th Infantry Division was heavily involved in the defense of Saigon. He includes some Vietnam history leading to the Tet Offensive and some researched insights on the press coverage that heavily influenced the ultimate outcome.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781604749298
  • Publisher: Publish America
  • Publication date: 8/25/2008
  • Pages: 204
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.47 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2008

    How the U.S. press misrepresented the progress of the war in Vietnam

    Victory Stolen is a bit different from what I call the usual "I was in Vietnam and here's what happened to me" story. Dave Henard certainly recounts in detail his experiences in Vietnam, which constitute a pretty fair read by itself. What sets his book apart, however, is the interweaving of his experiences, the experiences of his opponents (in their own words), and the press. Having read a fair number of books on Vietnam, Dave's is the first I've seen that provides this perspective in a straightforward manner. I would rank this book near the top of the list of the Vietnam-era books because of its rather unique perspective and its critical examination of the press coverage of the war and how that coverage reflected into the antiwar sentiment in the U.S. Henard shows convincingly that the North Vietnamese were intentionally waging a propaganda war while knowingly losing the ground war in South Vietnam. While some of us believe this scenario and some of us don't, Henard's use of quotes from North Vietnamese leaders make it difficult to posit a different scenario that fits the facts. This book can be read as the recounting of one man's Vietnam war experience, but it has far more value when read as an example of how a lack of critical thinking on the part of most Americans cost one nation its identity and its future as a free country and another its first war loss in its 200 year history (actually as I like to refer to it, we didn't lose, we forfeited). I was assigned to Phan Rang Air Base and Soc Trang Army Installation, Republic of Vietnam during 1970. Bob Ghormley

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