Vietnam Inc. by Philip Jones Griffiths, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Vietnam Inc.

Vietnam Inc.

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by Philip Jones Griffiths
     
 

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First published in 1971, Vietnam Inc. was crucial in changing public attitudes in the United States, turning the tide of opinion and ultimately helping to put an end to the Vietnam War. Photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths' groundbreaking account of the war was the outcome of three years' reporting and is one of the most detailed surveys of any conflict. Showing

Overview

First published in 1971, Vietnam Inc. was crucial in changing public attitudes in the United States, turning the tide of opinion and ultimately helping to put an end to the Vietnam War. Photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths' groundbreaking account of the war was the outcome of three years' reporting and is one of the most detailed surveys of any conflict. Showing us the true horrors of the war as well as a study of Vietnamese rural life, the author creates a compelling argument against the de-humanizing power of the modern war machine and American imperialism. Rare and highly sought-after, the book has become one of the enduring classics of photojournalism. Phaidon's Vietnam Inc. is a careful recreation of the original with Philip Jones Griffiths' same personal layouts and commentaries. A new foreword by US linguist and political critic Noam Chomsky discusses the book's impact in changing American public opinion.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780714846033
Publisher:
Phaidon Press
Publication date:
01/01/2006
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,158,494
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

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Vietnam Inc. 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Grady1GH More than 1 year ago
Philip Jones Griffiths' very difficult photojournalistic essay, VIETNAM INC., is the result of his on site documentation of the Vietnam war as a photojournalist from 1968 to 1971 - that period of time when the war was at its worst from all sides. His image statements as well as his written comments remain some of the most pungent of the many books and works of art that were stimulated by the Vietnam conflict. This book was originally published in 1971 and caused such furor among government agencies who saw the work as an 'unAmerican' document condemning an ongoing war, among returned veterans still trying to make sense out of the chaos and mind destroying mission from which they returned bruised and battered physically and emotionally, among families of veterans who did not return from the war machine, and from those who wanted to believe that what we did to a little country called Vietnam was warranted in the desire to spread democracy. All wars are captured in literature - whether in the eloquence of poetry from WW I and WW II and the many the novels - or films that painted America as a savior of needy people - or in music not the least of which is the 'War Requiem' by Sir Benjamin Britten - or in art. Philip Jones Griffiths used the camera to freeze the moments of the sadness, the sorrow, the errors, the devastation, and the pity of war. Now the book is back in print and should belong in every library of everyone who questions the validity of war. The photographs are brilliant achievements, sharing not only the panoply of reactions between the various branches of the military stationed in Vietnam, but also the varied reactions from the people whose country and homes were gradually being defoliated, scarred, completely destroyed or degraded. The faces of the soldiers are here as are the faces of the Vietnamese people and slowly viewing them page by page is a disturbing experience. Gratefully many of the photographs from this book are now placed before the public eye in museum exhibitions, such as the current powerful one ENGAGED OBSERVERS at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Hopefully with this book being available once again and with the works in museums there will be enough of the message that whatever happened in Vietnam should never happen again. This in a challenging and very important portfolio whose images speak far louder than words. Grady Harp