×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Vietnamese Cookbook
     

The Vietnamese Cookbook

5.0 1
by Diana My Tran, Steve Raymer (Photographer)
 
In The Vietnamese Cookbook, Diana My Tran transforms many of her complex traditional dishes into new simpler versions - tailored to the fast pace of America and the freshest ingredients from our local supermarkets. In Vietnam, a traditional meal consists mainly of rice accompanied by a salty dish of seafood or meat, vegetables and/or a composed salad. Diana invites

Overview

In The Vietnamese Cookbook, Diana My Tran transforms many of her complex traditional dishes into new simpler versions - tailored to the fast pace of America and the freshest ingredients from our local supermarkets. In Vietnam, a traditional meal consists mainly of rice accompanied by a salty dish of seafood or meat, vegetables and/or a composed salad. Diana invites you to create your own memorable meals with more than 100 tantalizing recipes for authentic Vietnamese sauces, appetizers, salads, soups, main dishes, desserts, and beverages. Combine the tempting healthful food with Steve Raymer’s magnificent photographs of Vietnam, and you’ll truly taste the exquisite flavors of this age-old country in all its beauty and richness.

Editorial Reviews

The Washington Post Monica Bhide
Diana's caramel shrimp recipe is reprinted in the Washington Post. "Her 2000 book, ‘The Vietnamese Cookbook,’ was one of the first in this country to focus on Vietnamese food. This is her favorite recipe, served traditionally with rice and a bowl of soup.
KLIATT
Vietnamese cuisine, which combines elements from Chinese, Japanese and French cooking, is becoming increasingly popular. My Tran has developed simplified versions of classic recipes that are practical and utilize modern conveniences without sacrificing quality. Vietnamese cuisine is all about low-fat cooking based on lots of vegetables—which is extremely healthy. The book is divided into categories with introductory information prefacing each section. Gorgeous full-color photography is featured throughout. Each of the recipes has been reworked to allow for the faster pace of American life and the kind of ingredients that are available in American supermarkets. A sampling of the recipes: Peanut Sticky Rice, Peanut Hoisin Sauce, Spring Rolls, Asparagus Salad, Papaya Shrimp Salad, Shrimp Pineapple Soup, Sesame Chicken in Orange Sauce, Caramel Shrimp, Lemon Chicken, Sesame Spareribs, Beef Stew Vietnamese Style, Baked Salmon with Ginger and Scallion, and Five Spice Rice Cake. My Tran is also the author of another book, The Asian Diet, and she is a successful designer and dressmaker in Washington, D.C., as well. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2000, Capital Books (22841 Quicksilver Dr, Sterling, VA 20166), 119p. illus. index., Ages 15 to adult.
—Shirley Reis
Library Journal
For fans of Southeast Asian cuisine, here are two excellent cookbooks. An immigrant from Vietnam to the United States, My Tran has developed her own simplified versions of favorite childhood dishes, many of which now appear in The Vietnamese Cookbook. Her excellent introduction to one of Southeast Asia's most colorful cuisines provides more than 100 recipes for such tempting treats as Spring Rolls and Lemon Rice mixed in with a few pinches of personal recollections and some outstanding color photographs. Novice cooks will especially appreciate the clear, easy-to-understand layout of each recipe, which takes the intimidation out of preparing these dishes. My Tran's book will serve as a good complement to other, more classic Vietnamese cookbooks, such as Nicole Routhier's The Foods of Vietnam (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1989), and is recommended for most public libraries. Rather than simplifying or adapting recipes for American tastes and markets, chef and restaurant owner Su-Mei Yu instead serves up a cookbook that pays homage to the cuisine of her homeland while offering detailed instructions on preparing Thai dishes in the old manner. Cracking the Coconut covers everything from the equipment and ingredients needed to traditional preparation methods such as the use of a mortar and pestle. The text not only gives readers 175 delicious recipes but also provides a fascinating look at the history of Thai cooking as well as a few glimpses at the people and forces that have helped shape it. For the most part, the author forgoes the traditional cookbook arrangement by type of dish (i.e., appetizers, salads, desserts, etc.) and instead devotes chapters to a specific ingredient such as rice or asignature dish such as Thai salads. A sumptuous feast for both serious and armchair cooks, this lavishly detailed cookbook is highly recommended for all public libraries.--John Charles, Scottsdale P.L., AZ Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781892123121
Publisher:
Capital Books, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/2000
Series:
Capital Lifestyles Series
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.56(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Diana My Tran emigrated to the U.S. from Vietnam in 1975. She brought with her a talent for preparing the cuisine of her native country. Now a successful designer and dressmaker in Washington, DC, she has experimented and adapted her traditional recipes to the faster pace of American life. She is the author of The Vietnamese Cookbook and The Asian Diet.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Vietnamese Cookbook 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love to cook Asian foods and I find this book a treasure to keep. The pictures are beautiful, the instructions are easy to follow and the dishes are fast to prepare. I even lost some weight too. I recommend this book to everybody who want to cook delicious Vietnamese foods.