Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN

Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN

4.0 1
by Andrew Wiest, Jim Webb
     
 

ISBN-10: 081479467X

ISBN-13: 9780814794678

Pub. Date: 10/01/2009

Publisher: New York University Press

2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award for Biography

Vietnam’s Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN chronicles the lives of Pham Van Dinh and Tran Ngoc Hue, two of the brightest young stars in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN). Both men fought with valor in a war that seemed to have no end,

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Overview

2009 Society for Military History Distinguished Book Award for Biography

Vietnam’s Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN chronicles the lives of Pham Van Dinh and Tran Ngoc Hue, two of the brightest young stars in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN). Both men fought with valor in a war that seemed to have no end, exemplifying ARVN bravery and determination that is largely forgotten or ignored in the West. However, while Hue fought until he was captured by the North Vietnamese Army and then endured thirteen years of captivity, Dinh surrendered and defected to the enemy, for whom he served as a teacher in the reeducation of his former ARVN comrades.

An understanding of how two lives that were so similar diverged so dramatically provides a lens through which to understand the ARVN and South Vietnam’s complex relationship with Americas government and military. The lives of Dinh and Hue reflect the ARVNs battlefield successes, from the recapture of the Citadel in Hue City in the Tet Offensive of 1968, to Dinhs unheralded role in the seizure of Hamburger Hill a year later. However, their careers expose an ARVN that was over-politicized, tactically flawed, and dependent on American logistical and firepower support. Marginalized within an American war, ARVN faced a grim fate as U.S. forces began to exit the conflict. As the structure of the ARVN/U.S. alliance unraveled, Dinh and Hue were left alone to make the most difficult decisions of their lives.

Andrew Wiest weaves historical analysis with a compelling narrative, culled from extensive interviews with Dinh, Hue, and other key figures. Once both military superstars, Dinh is viewed by a traitor by many within the South Vietnamese community, while Hue, an expatriate living in northern Virginia, is seen as a hero who never let go of his ideals. Their experiences and legacies mirror that of the ARVNs rise and fall as well as the tragic history of South Vietnam.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780814794678
Publisher:
New York University Press
Publication date:
10/01/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
1,057,341
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword by James Webb
Preface:Welcome to America
Introduction: Welcome to Vietnam
1 Coming of Age in a Time of War
2 A War Transformed: Battle, Politics, and the Americanization of the War, 1963–1966
3 Fighting Two Wars: Years of Attrition and Pacification, 1966–1967
4 A Time for Heroes: The Tet Offensive
5 After Tet: The Year of Hope
6 Hamburger Hill: The Untold Story of the Battle for Dong Ap Bia
7 A War Transformed: Vietnamization, 1969–1970
8 Shattered Lives and Broken Dreams: Operation
Lam Son
9 The Making of a Traitor
10 Journeys Home: Life in the Wake of a Lost War
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
About the Author

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Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MichaelDo46 More than 1 year ago
There are things that repeats interestingly in world history. The differences between the US and South Vietnam regarding the nature of Vietnam War is a valuable lesson for the policy makers in the Capitol and Administration. When giving something to others, we should know if the thing are really needed in such situation they are facing. South Vietnamese troops were not bad, but were not be trained and supported properly to fight the insurgent war against the experienced enemies.