×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Vile France: 255 Years of Duplicity, Cowardice and Cheese
     

Vile France: 255 Years of Duplicity, Cowardice and Cheese

5.0 1
by Denis Boyles
 

In this bitingly funny and insightful polemic, Boyles, using his knowledge of history and his shrewd eye for current events, examines the internal crises -- a falling birth rate, an expanding Muslim minority, economic stagnation, a lessening of international prestige -- that have changed the personality of what was once 'La Belle France', transforming it into a

Overview


In this bitingly funny and insightful polemic, Boyles, using his knowledge of history and his shrewd eye for current events, examines the internal crises -- a falling birth rate, an expanding Muslim minority, economic stagnation, a lessening of international prestige -- that have changed the personality of what was once 'La Belle France', transforming it into a nation afflicted with status anxiety. He explains how a country that endlessly repeats its credentials as America's oldest ally became one of our most resolute enemies, wielding the biggest weapon in its arsenal -- the European Union -- against the interests of an America that it fears and envies. While making clear his affection for the "France" of the French people, he targets the "France" of the ruling elite -- from de Gaulle to Chirac -- who have always run the country as a private club, often to the angry dismay of its citizens.

Editorial Reviews

Victor Davis Hanson
"Remember the Paris heat wave of 2003 that killed 15,000 Frenchmen, the obscene French arms sales to Saddam, and Minister de Villepin's bushwhacking of America at the UN? All that and far more are in Denis Boyles' timely Vile France, an at times lighthearted and always insightful look at how the French elite bamboozles the world in its crass support for mass murderers, corrupt totalitarians, and any tinhorn dictator that expresses a shared hatred of the United States­venom that is all gussied up with Gallic intellectual pretension and appeals to fraternity and humanism. Boyles' illustrations of the categories of French perfidy would make great comedy­if they were not so deadly accurate and all so sad."
author of Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise to Western Power
David Horowitz
"A Francophobe's feast. Boyles makes freedom fries, decanting Bordeaux in the gutters and jokes about the odious Chirac look like reasonable responses to a very long provocation. Read it and weep­with laughter."
author of Radical Son
Harry Stein
"Denis Boyles' smart, caustic, laughing-out-loud funny take on France is long overdue. In exposing these falsest of friends as precisely what they have always been­wolves with sheep souls­he sweeps away the feel-good myths with which we've deluded ourselves for generations. This is a wonderful and vitally important book."
author of How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (and Found Inner Peace)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594030529
Publisher:
Encounter Books
Publication date:
12/28/2004
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
6.44(w) x 9.24(h) x (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Vile France: 255 Years of Duplicity, Cowardice and Cheese 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an excellent subjective view of France. The author admits that it is a polemic, and he has lived in France. I was a bit afraid initially that this was one of those 'Fox News-type' reports where the author remains in the U.S. and collects all his data from the Internet and never visits the places he is writing about. But it isn't. Boyle has both extensive international experience, as well as great experience in France itself. The view is of an egotistical, Leftist elite that rules France, all the time stifling the vast majority of French people living outside the Il de Paris (a 'hexagon' that encircles Paris). The author spends much of the book detailing the unfree media in France (publicly-funded and dominated by communist unions), and the elite that runs the country for only its own good. He calls the French 'wolves with souls of sheep'. I mean, what can you say about a country that to a large extent collaborated with the Nazis, almost collapsed in World War I, invaded most of Europe under Napoleon, and had a very bloody revolution (in comparison to America's). A country that believes that only in France can one find fine wine and cheese. A country that claims the U.S. only acts in its own interests, all the while, modern French foreign policy is basically a rubber stamp for its own oil companies, and is based on 'automatic' anti-Americanism (indeed, Jean Francois Revel once said, modern French intellectual thought has no content, outside of anti-Americanism). The book shows the lack of French 'fair play', and all the atrocious things the French did in Africa and the Mideast. For example, the French allowed the Ayotola Khomeni to stay in Paris, then approved his plan to leave and take over Iran, so that they could then sell Iran French products and weapons secretly, above the head of the U.S. The French involvement with Saddam is well-known, as is the corruption at the UN and the corruption in the UN 'Food for Oil' program. Thus, it is France, not the U.S., that flouts the will of the international community (anyone recall French nuclear testing in the Pacific in 1995 ?). The country that educated the most vicious killers in history (the Khmer Rouge leadership, to name just one example). It is a corrupt, bureaucratic, and increasinlgly anti-Semitic nation (a country that regularly 'condemns' Israel and sides with the Palestinians). It is a country where being called a cynic is a compliment ! I have personally been in France perhaps 10 times, mostly in the 1990s, I found it to be very beautiful, in the countryside. Outside of Paris, the people are very friendly, and they even like the U.S (contrary to what most Americans think). I met so many nice, friendly people in my time in France, and thus, I would never condemn France as a whole, only 'political France'. I personally believe that the average French person is decent and civil. Yet, I at times was overwhelmed by the crime and the lack of order in the larger cities. I once rode in the Lyon subway system at night and was in fear for my life, as marauding immigrant youths terrorized people and vandalized things (the elite doesn't really stop this crime, because doing so would be too difficult, and would not fit in with their Leftist ideology that the poor are just 'stealing rfom the rich'). Anti-Semitism is on the rise, both among non-Muslims, and among Muslims. Islamic fundamentalism is also on the rise, and will soon be a very strong political force in France (it already is). One reason is the lack of integration of the minority in mainstream French life. Outside of Paris, things are better, but as the book states, the author's 'beef' is not with the French people themselves, but with the Paris elites, and France as a political entity. This is the best modern book about France. The book is also very funny at times. Highly recommended.