Violet Raines Almost Got Struck by Lightning

Violet Raines Almost Got Struck by Lightning

4.6 26
by Danette Haworth
     
 

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Spunky, headstrong Violet Raines is happy with things just the way they are in her sleepy backwoods Florida town. She loves going to the fish fry with her best friend, Lottie, and collecting BrainFreeze cups with her good friend Eddie. She loves squeezing into the open trunk of the old cypress tree, looking for alligators in the river, and witnessing lighting

Overview

Spunky, headstrong Violet Raines is happy with things just the way they are in her sleepy backwoods Florida town. She loves going to the fish fry with her best friend, Lottie, and collecting BrainFreeze cups with her good friend Eddie. She loves squeezing into the open trunk of the old cypress tree, looking for alligators in the river, and witnessing lighting storms on a warm summer day.

But Violet's world is turned upside down when Melissa moves to town from big city Detroit. All of a sudden Violet's supposed to want to wear makeup, and watch soap operas, and play Truth or Dare! It'll take the help of Violet's friends, her Momma, a few run-ins with lightning, and maybe even Melissa, for Violet to realize that growing up doesn't have to mean changing who you are.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Candice Ransom
Violet Raines is good at making faces: she makes an evil face at Eddie, her friend who thinks she is chicken because she will not cross the net bridge over Hatchett River; she makes an I-don't-care face, which is the opposite of a smile; she makes a jealous face when pretty Melissa Gold moves to Mitchell Hammock and threatens to steal Violet's best friend Lottie. Violet hates Melissa's prissy ways. Only show-off city girls wear make-up and sandals with heels and watch Paris Heights, a soap opera. From the very beginning, Melissa drives a wedge between Violet and Lottie. Melissa also acts as a mirror, revealing the fact that, although Violet will start seventh grade, she refuses to cross the bridge from catching fireflies to thinking about boys. Echoing the tension between the girls, thunderstorms grumble nearly every steamy Florida afternoon. One afternoon when Violet and Lottie are arguing about Melissa, lightning strikes Lottie's house, causing serious damage. The local pastor says each day has its troubles. Violet learns to face troublesome days and the fact she does not own Lottie. At the end of the summer, Violet is glad she has friends in junior high, even Melissa, who gave her a makeover and showed Violet a glimpse of her grown-up face. Violet chooses not to reveal that face yet or cross the bridge. She knows she can take the long way around. This is a fine first novel. Reviewer: Candice Ransom
School Library Journal

Gr 4-7

Eleven-year-old Violet Raines is no "shrinking violet," especially when it comes to girlie girl Melissa Gold, whose family has just moved to her small Florida town in the 1970s. Violet's best friend, Lottie, is fascinated by Melissa and her talk of life in Detroit, "the murder capital of the United States." Violet, however, thinks Melissa is a "priss" and proves it by showing her the fish-head bucket at the Sunday fish fry (Melissa runs away to vomit). After Lottie's house is struck by lightning, she and her sisters stay at Melissa's big house, much to Violet's chagrin. While Melissa and Lottie talk movie stars, makeup, and bras, Violet still enjoys squeezing into the tree cave, exploring outdoors, and hanging out with her childhood buddy Eddie. Haworth takes on coming-of-age dilemmas with spunk, innocence, and a cast of believable, well-developed characters, describing the challenges kids face when one friend matures faster than another, the two-against-one pitting of girl trios, and budding romance. Violet passes through the last doors of childhood and into the uncertain entryway of junior high with acute sensitivity while maintaining her authentic sense of self and the surprising, satisfying support of her friends. An enjoyable read with plenty of discussible points about relationships.-D. Maria LaRocco, Cuyahoga Public Library, Strongsville, OH

Kirkus Reviews
A coming-of-age tale that is as full of sass as its uniquely named protagonist. At 11, Violet is caught betwixt and between childhood and adolescence. She remains very much a child, reveling in hollowed-out tree trunks and playing Barbies with her best friend's little sister. However, just like the ominous atmospheric changes occurring prior to turbulent weather, Violet's growing awareness of a developmental shift among her peers leaves her unsettled and unsure. Caught in this transformation is Violet's relationship with Lottie, which is complicated by the upheaval caused by newcomer Melissa, who has one foot firmly planted in adolescence. Rumblings of romantic changes in her friendship with Eddie also add to Violet's confusion. Haworth deftly explores Violet's ambivalence toward growing up with an authenticity that will resonate with readers, who will appreciate her competent management of such crucial tween issues as best friends, fidelity and impending maturity. Violet is a worthy ally for readers navigating their own stormy evolution. (Fiction. 8-12)
From the Publisher

“Eleven-year-old Violet Raines is no "shrinking violet," especially when it comes to girlie girl Melissa Gold, whose family has just moved to her small Florida town in the 1970s. Violet's best friend, Lottie, is fascinated by Melissa and her talk of life in Detroit, "the murder capital of the United States." Violet, however, thinks Melissa is a "priss" and proves it by showing her the fish-head bucket at the Sunday fish fry (Melissa runs away to vomit). After Lottie's house is struck by lightning, she and her sisters stay at Melissa's big house, much to Violet's chagrin. While Melissa and Lottie talk movie stars, makeup, and bras, Violet still enjoys squeezing into the tree cave, exploring outdoors, and hanging out with her childhood buddy Eddie. Haworth takes on coming-of-age dilemmas with spunk, innocence, and a cast of believable, well-developed characters, describing the challenges kids face when one friend matures faster than another, the two-against-one pitting of girl trios, and budding romance. Violet passes through the last doors of childhood and into the uncertain entryway of junior high with acute sensitivity while maintaining her authentic sense of self and the surprising, satisfying support of her friends. An enjoyable read with plenty of discussible points about relationships.” —School Library Journal

“A coming-of-age tale that is as full of sass as its uniquely named protagonist. At 11, Violet is caught betwixt and between childhood and adolescence. She remains very much a child, reveling in hollowed-out tree trunks and playing Barbies with her best friend's little sister. However, just like the ominous atmospheric changes occurring prior to turbulent weather, Violet's growing awareness of a developmental shift among her peers leaves her unsettled and unsure. Caught in this transformation is Violet's relationship with Lottie, which is complicated by the upheaval caused by newcomer Melissa, who has one foot firmly planted in adolescence. Rumblings of romantic changes in her friendship with Eddie also add to Violet's confusion. Haworth deftly explores Violet's ambivalence toward growing up with an authenticity that will resonate with readers, who will appreciate her competent management of such crucial tween issues as best friends, fidelity and impending maturity. Violet is a worthy ally for readers navigating their own stormy evolution.” —Kirkus Reviews

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802720726
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
02/16/2010
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Danette Haworth held a number of writing jobs before turning to fiction, including positions as a technical writer and a travel writer. Growing up in a military family, Danette lived up and down the East Coast and in Turkey and England; she now calls Orlando, Florida, her home. Violet Raines Almost Got Struck by Lightning is her first novel. Visit Danette at www.danettehaworth.com or www.danettehaworth.net.

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4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Mother-Daughter-Book-Club More than 1 year ago
Violet's hometown of Mitchell Hammock, Florida, is a dangerous place full of alligators, coral snakes and lightening striking all over. But it's also a place of adventure where net bridges swing over creeks, hollowed-out trees turn into secret hiding places, and kids feel safe exploring it all with friends. Beneath the adventure lies a predictable routine for Violet. She goes to church on Sundays, helps her best-friend and next-door neighbor Lottie with a weekly fish fry afterwards, and explores the woods around her home with her other friend Eddie. She's an only child who is on her own often while her mama works at the local bakery, but she's never lonely. When Melissa moves to town from the Northern city of Detroit, Violet's predictable summer before junior high is suddenly anything but. Melissa likes make up and soap operas, and she writes to movie stars. Lottie takes to her immediately, and Violet fears Melissa is trying to steal her best friend. She's also worried about changes in her body, talk of bras and her own feelings for Eddie. While Violet works through her conflicted feelings, she finds a way to open up her world without giving up who she truly is. Mother-daughter book clubs will find Violet's fresh voice a delightful opening to talk about issues of friendship and growing up. I highly recommend Violet Raines Almost Got Struck by Lightning by Danette Haworth for groups with girls aged nine to twelve.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is fantastic and I recomend it for anyone who loves to read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But the real cover is her doing a cartwheel i know because i have it in real life
Julie Cotter More than 1 year ago
i love this book it is my absolute favorite
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was better than I thought it was going to be. It was a cute story and it had me reading the whole book in 1 day. It's worth buying!
HumorWriter More than 1 year ago
There's no way to avoid falling in love with Violet Raines as she struggles to cross that precarious bridge between childhood and adolescence. Violet's voice is honest and sweet and funny. And she has so much to deal with -- a friend who's growing up too quickly, the fancy new girl in town, a boy who's always been her buddy, but might be more. Did I mention the alligator, terrifying bridge and lightning? Oh, the lightning!
I thought the author did a fabulous job of creating the setting, too -- woods filled with Cypress trees, swampy areas with coral snakes and the sizzling, scary summer storms all Floridians will recognize.
Treat yourself to a book that might just become your new favorite -- Violet Raines Almost Got Struck by Lightning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've never read it but it sounds good!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is A-MAZING!!!! I totally loved it when I was in fourth grade, I'm now going into eighth and I still read and enjoy it. It's perfect for all ages.
Livvy Walker More than 1 year ago
I read thiis in the 3rd grade and could never find it but i did gr8 book
Lynda Shiro More than 1 year ago
i loved this book! it was sad, happy, and you tend to choose sides. i recommend this book to everyone. its a quick fun read
ELICAOAT More than 1 year ago
This was the best book I had ever read. It was exciting to see the difference between Violet and Melissa, but how they could still be friends because of Lottie. I really did love this book. If you are in middle school, and you are having some friend troubles, really, read this book. It would help you decide what to do, and if there is a fight, it is a better thing to bury the hatchet than to fight fire with fire. Because, of course, you only get a bigger fire. I am in middle school myself and it really helped me when I got jealous just like Violet over my best friend spending all of her time with her neighbor, even though we are all neighbors. This book is really just great, and if you want something exciting and fun please read this book. Thanks!! By the way, this book was really really really great. It isn't challenging, as in there aren't a lot of words a ten, elleven, or twelve year old would not know, so it is good for people. It was funny because of all the times they made fun of each other. My favorite part of the book was the part when Lottie (Charlotte) and Violet were talkking to the news reporter and the people were taking pictures. Thank you so much and i just want to use up all of the characters remaining so here goes! ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd dddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thebaest going to us e a.ll the letter characters okhrer goes nuttin!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!srdytftgfgrgfhskdtdtdpghgfhgjghjdjfuwiqiehhcvccfkjjidklwpwofitryed got bored seya
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