Virgil's Aeneid: Semantic Relations and Proper Names

Virgil's Aeneid: Semantic Relations and Proper Names

5.0 1
by Michael Paschalis
     
 

ISBN-10: 0198146884

ISBN-13: 9780198146889

Pub. Date: 11/28/1997

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Paschalis offers a new reading of the whole Aeneid based on the meaning of proper names and using the scene of Laocoon and the Trojan Horse as a model. He sheds fresh light on every episode and book of the epic from the storm of Aeneid 1 to the death of Turnus, and reveals a sustained, pervasive, and deep-going exploitation of the meaning of names.

Overview

Paschalis offers a new reading of the whole Aeneid based on the meaning of proper names and using the scene of Laocoon and the Trojan Horse as a model. He sheds fresh light on every episode and book of the epic from the storm of Aeneid 1 to the death of Turnus, and reveals a sustained, pervasive, and deep-going exploitation of the meaning of names.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198146889
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
11/28/1997
Pages:
456
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)
Lexile:
1360L (what's this?)

Table of Contents

Abbreviations and Bibliographical Note xv(2)
Note on Structure and Conventions xvii
Introduction 1(33)
I. Names and issues 1(2)
II. Subject, method, and terminology 3(5)
III. The Laocoon-Horse sequence: introduction 8(3)
IV. The Laocoon-Horse sequence: the semantic components 11(15)
V. The Laocoon-Horse sequence: other components 26(8)
Book 1 34(36)
1. Overview
34(21)
1. The storm (34-156)
34(7)
2. The harbour at Carthage and Aeneas' stag-shooting (157-222)
41(1)
3. Iuppiter curas iactans and the arces of Carthage (223-304)
42(1)
4. Changing garments in the forest (305-417)
43(3)
5. The horses of Carthage (418-49)
46(1)
6. Gazes within Juno's templum (450-62)
47(2)
7. Insidious and inflaming gifts (643-97)
49(2)
8. Gazes and wounds (709-22)
51(2)
9. The gifts and the stimuli of Bacchus (723-56)
53(2)
II. Saturnia, Saturnus, and Saturnia tellus
55(2)
III. Shipwrecked Trojans (113-23)
57(2)
IV. Missing companions: Antheus, Capys, and Caicus (180-5)
59(1)
V. Jupiter's prophecy (254-96)
60(4)
VI. Harpalyce (316-17)
64(1)
VII. The temple pictures (450-93)
65(3)
VIII. Belus and Bitias (728-39)
68(2)
Book 2 70(41)
1. Overview
70(29)
1. Aeneas' 'wound': Memory, dolor, and dolus (1-13)
70(1)
2. Mycenae, Tenedos, and Trojan blindness (13-56)
70(1)
3. The sight of Sinon: bonds and lies (57-198)
71(2)
4. improuida pectora (199-249)
73(2)
5. The return of the ships (250-67)
75(2)
6. The return of Hector (268-97)
77(2)
7. Aeneas' blurred vision (298-317)
79(1)
8. The descent of Panthus (318-35)
80(1)
9. XXX (336-54)
81(1)
10. caua umbra and caeca nox (355-434)
82(4)
11. caecae fores and the dislodging of the 'all-seeing' tower (453-68)
86(1)
12. The light and the exuuiae of Pyrrhus (469-505)
87(1)
13. The gaze of Priam and Hecuba (506-58)
88(3)
14. The gaze of Aeneas (567-623)
91(3)
15. The path to Ida (634-804)
94(5)
II. Myrmidonum Dolopum; Dorica castra; Danai
99(1)
III. Tenedos and Mycenae
100(2)
IV. Thymoetes and Capys (32-9)
102(1)
V. Laocoon
102(1)
VI. Sinon
103(4)
VII. Deiphobus, Vcalegon, and Sigea... freta (309-13)
107(1)
VIII. The companions of Aeneas
108(3)
Book 3 111(38)
1. Overview
111(36)
1. Thrace: curuum litus and tumulus (13-71)
111(5)
2. The circle of the Cyclades (72-98)
116(4)
3. The shore of the Curetes (99-189)
120(4)
4. The XXX of the Strophades (190-267)
124(5)
5. Leucates, Actium, and the curved shield of Abas (268-89)
129(2)
6. The Chaonian harbour of Buthrotum (290-505)
131(2)
7. The bosom of the desired land (506-20)
133(1)
8. The bow-shaped harbour (521-47)
134(1)
9. The land of the blinded Cyclops (554-683)
135(10)
10. The sickle-shaped harbour of Drepanum (706-15)
145(2)
II. sinus Herculei; Lacinia, Caulon, and Scylaceum (548-53)
147(1)
III. claustra Pelori (410-19, 684-8)
147(2)
Book 4 149(32)
1. Overview
149(26)
1. Words and wounds (1-53)
149(1)
2. Gifts, words, and an unhealing wound (54-89)
150(2)
3. Deceitful words (90-172)
152(2)
4. The flight of winged Fama (173-95)
154(1)
5. Winged Fama and the son of Hammon (196-218)
155(1)
6. The gaze of Jupiter and Dido's XXX (219-37)
155(1)
7. The descent of Mercury (238-78)
156(3)
8. The impact of the vision of Mercury (279-95)
159(1)
9. Futile words (296-392)
160(2)
10. Dido's gaze and Aeneas' ships (393-415)
162(1)
11. The ships and the oak (416-49)
162(2)
12. The rejection of Dido's gifts and her distorted vision (450-73)
164(1)
13. Dido's pyre (474-521)
165(2)
14. The stormy wakefulness of Phoenissa (522-53)
167(1)
15. The blindness of Aeneas and the return of Mercury (554-70)
168(1)
16. Aeneas' flashing sword and Ceraunia (571-83)
168(1)
17. The gaze of Dido and the light of Aurora (584-629)
169(2)
18. Dido's pyre and Barce (630-41)
171(1)
19. Dido on the pyre and Aeneas' XXX (642-71)
172(1)
20. Fateful words (672-87)
173(1)
21. The last gaze of wounded Dido (688-92)
173(1)
22. The descent of Iris (693-705)
174(1)
II. The genealogy of Fama and Dido's oath
175(4)
III. Iris
179(2)
Book 5 181(28)
1. Overview
181(23)
1. The gaze and memory of Palinurus (8-34)
181(1)
2. Acestes
181(4)
3. The ship-race (114-285)
185(3)
4. The foot-race (286-361)
188(3)
5. The boxing-match (362-484)
191(2)
6. The archery contest (485-544)
193(3)
7. The lusus Troiae (545-603)
196(1)
8. The descent of Iris and the burning of the ships (604-99)
197(3)
9. Venus, Saturnia, and Saturnius (779-826)
200(1)
10. The descent of winged Somnus and the fall of Palinurus (827-71)
201(3)
II. Sergestus and Pholoe
204(1)
III. The participants in the foot-race
205(2)
IV. The burning of the ships
207(2)
Book 6 209(35)
1. Overview
209(17)
1. Aeneas' ship and Euboean Cumae (1-101)
209(2)
2. The prerequisites for the katabasis (102-263)
211(3)
3. The uestibulum of the palace of Dis (268-94)
214(2)
4. The crossing of the Styx (295-425)
216(3)
5. Tartarus (548-627)
219(2)
6. Elysium (637-892)
221(4)
7. The Ivory Gate (893-901)
225(1)
II. The descent of Daedalus and the fall of Icarus (14-41)
226(2)
III. Palinurus: the fatal distortion of a name (337-83)
228(2)
IV. The wound of Dido (440-74)
230(2)
V. The wounds of Deiphobus (494-534)
232(2)
VI. Tartarus: XXX and XXX (548-627)
234(3)
VII. The return of the Roman heroes (756-892)
237(7)
Book 7 244(31)
1. Overview
244(2)
1. From Caieta to Latium (1-36)
244(2)
2. The invocation of Erato and Latinus' genealogy (37-57)
246(1)
3. Portents and the oracle of Faunus (58-106)
246(2)
4. The embassy to Latinus (148-285)
248(3)
5. The gaze and wound of returning Juno (286-322)
251(1)
6. Saturnia, Saturnus, and Allecto (323-640)
252(2)
7. The missions of Allecto (341-539)
254(4)
8. Latinus, Saturnia Iuno, and the breaking of the Gates of War (572-640)
258(1)
9. The opening of the Gates of Song (641-6)
259(1)
II. The web of Circe
260(2)
III. The tables prophecy (107-47)
262(2)
IV. The pastoral world of Galaesus, Tyrrhus, and Almo (531-9)
264(1)
V. The Italian catalogue (647-817)
264(11)
Book 8 275(27)
1. Overview
275(13)
1. Turnus Hippotades and the embassy to Argyripa (1-17)
275(1)
2. Laomedontius heros (18-25)
276(1)
3. The vision of Tiberinus (26-34)
276(1)
4. The speech of Tiberinus (35-65)
277(2)
5. Pallas' olive and young Pallas (90-125)
279(1)
6. Hercules and the cave of Cacus (184-267)
280(1)
7. The walk at the site of Rome (306-69)
281(3)
8. Venus, Vulcan, and the cave of the Cyclopes (370-453)
284(1)
9. Pallas and the arms of Cytherea (520-40)
285(1)
10. The descent of Venus at Caere and the delivery of the Shield (608-731)
286(2)
II. Venulus, Venus, and aduentus dei
288(1)
III. The story of Cacus and the laudes Herculeae (184-305)
288(5)
IV. Brontes, Steropes, and Pyracmon (425)
293(2)
V. The Shield ekphrasis (626-728)
295(7)
Book 9 302(28)
I. Overview
302(19)
1. The descent of Iris (1-24)
302(2)
2. Caicus and the dark cloud (25-46)
304(1)
3. The attack on the naval station (47-158)
305(4)
4. The siege (159-75)
309(1)
5. Nisus and Euryalus (176-502)
310(3)
6. The collapse of the tower (530-70)
313(2)
7. The aristeia of Ascanius (590-671)
315(2)
8. Bitias and Pandarus (672-755)
317(3)
9. The return of Mnestheus and the retreat of Turnus (778-818)
320(1)
II. Nisus and Euryalus
321(4)
III. somno uinoque soluti (320-50)
325(4)
IV. The Rutulian invaders of the camp (679-87)
329(1)
Book 10 330(28)
I. Overview
330(18)
1. The Gates of Olympus and Jupiter's gaze (1-117)
330(1)
2. The Trojans on the camp walls (118-45)
330(1)
3. Aeneas on the ship's stern (146-275)
331(2)
4. The death of Pallas and Aeneas' revenge (439-605)
333(4)
5. The descent of Juno (633-88)
337(1)
6. Mezentius (689-908)
338(10)
II. The catalogue of the Trojans on the walls (123-45)
348(1)
III. The Etruscan catalogue (163-214)
349(3)
IV. Clausus and Dryops (344-9)
352(1)
V. Aeneas' vengeance killings (510-605)
352(6)
Book 11 358(22)
I. Overview
358(13)
1. Mezentius (1-21)
358(1)
2. Pallas (22-99)
359(2)
3. The Latins (100-38, 182-531)
361(3)
4. The spear-cast of Metabus and the first descent of Opis (532-96)
364(1)
5. Aconteus and Tyrrhenus (612-17)
365(1)
6. Falconlike Camilla and eaglelike Tarchon (699-759)
366(1)
7. Arruns and Camilla (759-835)
367(2)
8. The second descent of Opis (836-67)
369(1)
9. The retreat of the cavalry and the horses of Phoebus (868-915)
370(1)
II. Two distorted names
371(1)
III. Camilla
372(8)
Book 12 380(29)
I. Overview
380(26)
1. Wounded Turnus and his horses (1-112)
380(3)
2. The breaking of the truce (113-310)
383(3)
3. The wounding and healing of Aeneas; Turnus' aristeia from the chariot (311-440)
386(3)
4. A dreadful return (441-99)
389(1)
5. Juturna's stratagem and Turnus' blindness (554-696)
390(5)
6. The fight of the bulls (697-727)
395(1)
7. The sword of Metiscus; the Umbrian hound (728-65)
396(1)
8. The wild olive of Faunus (766-90)
397(2)
9. Wounds healed and unhealing (791-886)
399(1)
10. Turnus, Juturna, and the Dira (843-918)
400(2)
11. The death of Turnus (917-52)
402(4)
II. Thracian horses
406(1)
III. Turnus' aristeia from the chariot (324-82)
407(2)
Conclusion 409(10)
Salient semantic relations by book 409(10)
References 419(12)
Index of Selected Names and Words Discussed 431

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Virgil's Aeneid: Semantic Relations and Proper Names 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!