Virgin: Mary's Cult and the Re-emergence of the Goddess

Overview

The mother of Christ has taken various forms throughout the centuries—among them are the Blessed Virgin, the Queen of Heaven, the Madonna, and the spiritual mother of all the faithful. Yet despite her high enthronement in the Catholic Church, Mary, as both chaste goddess and earth mother, has her origins in pre-Christian religions, of which the chief deities were female. In this masterly exploration of the cult of Mary, Geoffrey Ashe examines ancinet myths, theology, history, literature, and feminine ...

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Overview

The mother of Christ has taken various forms throughout the centuries—among them are the Blessed Virgin, the Queen of Heaven, the Madonna, and the spiritual mother of all the faithful. Yet despite her high enthronement in the Catholic Church, Mary, as both chaste goddess and earth mother, has her origins in pre-Christian religions, of which the chief deities were female. In this masterly exploration of the cult of Mary, Geoffrey Ashe examines ancinet myths, theology, history, literature, and feminine spirituality to throw new light on the role of Mary in today's Church. Tracing the cult from its origins to the present day with the resubordination of Mary to Christ, this remarkable book also illuminates the spiritual battle of the sexes, a conflict that remains unresolved to this day.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780750950640
  • Publisher: The History Press
  • Publication date: 12/1/2008
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.90 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 30, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Brilliant look at a controversial issue.

    Ashe does what everybody that read Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code wished he would have done: he uses facts, dates, and peer-reviewed academic materials to back up the idea of the Sacred Feminine (what he calls "The Eternal Womanly") hidden within the Christian church's Virgin Mary. The author cites information from all sorts of sources, some albeit a bit less credible than others, that help him to weave a tale of how an ancient reverence for the feminine divine evolved into the subservient admittance of Jesus' mom into her status as Queen of Heaven.

    There is a hint that Ashe read Bradley's The Mists of Avalon, more than hinting that the ancient Goddess worship of old found a way to be smuggled into the church. Now, this would all seem like a knock-off of Brown's conspiracy theories, modern Neo-Pagan tendencies to find the divine in everything, and a fervent desire to subvert everything Christian - which all seems to be a bit too en vogue right now. All of this, except for the fact that Ashe's read was published with the academic in mind. Every single fact, tidbit, or conjecture the author makes is conveniently backed up with footnotes, an expansive index, and a kind finger pointing to bigger and better sources.

    Obviously this is skewed towards someone that is interested in finding the Divine Feminine in any religion, especially Christianity, but it shouldn't be dismissed as some conspiracy nut writing a book. A great read, but not for the feint of heart. It's heady at times, and many of his points are labored upon ad nauseam, but only to further prove his point.

    A definite read if this is your thing.

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