The Virgin Suicides: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview



This beautiful and sad first novel, recently adapted for a major motion picture, tells of a band of teenage sleuths who piece together the story of a twenty-year old family tragedy begun by the youngest daughter’s spectacular demise by self-defenstration, which inaugurates “the year of the suicides.”

An unforgettable first novel about adolescence -- told by a "collective" narrator whose wry, ...

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The Virgin Suicides: A Novel

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Overview



This beautiful and sad first novel, recently adapted for a major motion picture, tells of a band of teenage sleuths who piece together the story of a twenty-year old family tragedy begun by the youngest daughter’s spectacular demise by self-defenstration, which inaugurates “the year of the suicides.”

An unforgettable first novel about adolescence -- told by a "collective" narrator whose wry, intelligent voice speaks for an eclectic band of teenage trespassers, hborhood like so many sleuths. The first chapter appeared in The Paris Review, where it won the 1991 Aga Khan Prize for Fiction.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Eugenides's tantalizing, macabre first novel begins with a suicide, the first of the five bizarre deaths of the teenage daughters in the Lisbon family; the rest of the work, set in the author's native Michigan in the early 1970s, is a backward-looking quest as the male narrator and his nosy, horny pals describe how they strove to understand the odd clan of this first chapter, which appeared in The Paris Review , where it won the 1991 Aga Khan Prize for fiction. The sensationalism of the subject matter (based loosely on a factual account) may be off-putting to some readers, but Eugenides's voice is so fresh and compelling, his powers of observation so startling and acute, that most will be mesmerized. The title derives from a song by the fictional rock band Cruel Crux, a favorite of the Lisbon daughter Lux -- who, unlike her sisters Therese, Mary, Bonnie and Cecilia, is anything but a virgin by the tale's end. Her mother forces Lux to burn the album along with others she considers dangerously provocative. Mr. Lisbon, a mild-mannered high school math teacher, is driven to resign by parents who believe his control of their children may be as deficient as his control of his own brood. Eugenides risks sounding sophomoric in his attempt to convey the immaturity of high-school boys; while initially somewhat discomfiting, the narrator's voice (representing the collective memories of the group) acquires the ring of authenticity. The author is equally convincing when he describes the older locals' reactions to the suicide attempts. Under the narrator's goofy, posturing banter are some hard truths: mortality is a fact of life; teenage girls are more attracted to brawn than to brains (contrary to the testimony of the narrator's male relatives). This is an auspicious debut from an imaginative and talented writer.
Library Journal
Eugenides's remarkable first novel opens on a startling note:
On the morning the last Lisbon daughter took her turn at suicide . . . the two paramedics arrived at the house knowing exactly where the knife drawer was, and the gas oven, and the beam in the basement from which it was possible to tie a rope.
What follows is not, however, a horror novel, but a finely crafted work of literary if slightly macabre imagination. In an unnamed town in the slightly distant past, detailed in such precise and limpid prose that readers will surely feel that they grew up there, Cecilia -- the youngest and most obviously wacky of the luscious Lisbon girls -- finally succeeds in taking her own life. As the confused neighbors watch rather helplessly, the remaining sisters become isolated and unhinged, ending it all in a spectacular multiple suicide anticipated from the first page.

Eugenides's engrossing writing style keeps one reading despite a creepy feeling that one shouldn't be enjoying it so much. A black, glittering novel that won't be to everyone's taste but must be tried by readers looking for something different.

-- Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal

Library Journal
Eugenides's remarkable first novel opens on a startling note:
On the morning the last Lisbon daughter took her turn at suicide . . . the two paramedics arrived at the house knowing exactly where the knife drawer was, and the gas oven, and the beam in the basement from which it was possible to tie a rope.
What follows is not, however, a horror novel, but a finely crafted work of literary if slightly macabre imagination. In an unnamed town in the slightly distant past, detailed in such precise and limpid prose that readers will surely feel that they grew up there, Cecilia -- the youngest and most obviously wacky of the luscious Lisbon girls -- finally succeeds in taking her own life. As the confused neighbors watch rather helplessly, the remaining sisters become isolated and unhinged, ending it all in a spectacular multiple suicide anticipated from the first page.

Eugenides's engrossing writing style keeps one reading despite a creepy feeling that one shouldn't be enjoying it so much. A black, glittering novel that won't be to everyone's taste but must be tried by readers looking for something different.

-- Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal

Gilbert Taylor
The Lisbon girls, all five of whom committed suicide in the early 1970s, haunt the memories of boys next door in a wealthy Detroit suburb. A nameless narrator, one of the boys, 20 years later collects and weaves together the impressions that friends, neighbors, and parents had of the dead girls. Except for school and group outings to two ill-fated parties, the girls' lives played out confined to their dwelling, a cloistered existence protected by a mother vigilant for their virtue and by a meek father cowed by his feminized surroundings. Did those surroundings spur Cecilia to throw herself from a window, sending the house into a degenerating gloom that bottomed out with the final exits of the final four? One of the boys, a Twelve Stepper now who made it with the bad girl of the bunch, can't settle his addled mind on a theory, but the rest remember the time, place, and sightings of the pretty Lisbons with the magnified focus of their very furtiveness. The evocative reconstruction props up the adolescent atmospherics of that time (the author is now age 32) as much as it ostensibly dissects the tragedy, which the author's alter ego narrator finds is sadly unfathomable anyway. After this distinctive debut, Eugenides' second effort should reveal if he can expand his appeal beyond his generation.
Michiko Kakutani
A piercing first novel…lyrical and portentous.
The New York Times
Kirkus Reviews
Debut novelist Eugenides is a heavyweight: proof of it is in nearly every pitch-perfect sentence of this startlingly and very good book.

A group of teenage boys in a Detroit suburb have come under the siren spell of a group of like-aged sisters, the Lisbon girls, the eldest of whom, Cecilia, has killed herself by jumping out a bedroom window onto a fence. Shocked and dislocated by the fact of young, willful death, the boys are increasingly fascinated as the always strict and secretive Lisbon family goes into a kind of cold storage (the other girls eventually withdraw from school), and the house is let go into decrepitude (the boys, using binoculars from up in a treehouse, can see that the other girls have turned Cecilia's bedroom into a shrine). To rescue the Lisbon girls becomes the boys' instinctive obsession—and an accepted invitation to the prom almost accomplishes this. But one sister, Lux, has turned promiscuous—dooming her and her sisters' chances for freedom thereafter. Left to them all is death only. Eugenides, meanwhile, writes just about as well as anyone in recent memory has about male teenage desire, mythologizing, and half-rational thought: one unforgettable scene has the boys and the Lisbon girls communicating on the phone by playing certain popular songs close to the receiver for each other, third-party messages heartbreakingly personalized. The boys narrate the story together like a chorus, moving around in time, ever-haunted, in prose that is sinuous, untricky, yet polished. They come to recognize that the Lisbon girls mean life and death simultaneously—and that they will never get over having got to know this so young.

Maybe the mosteccentrically successful, genuinely lyrical first novel since William Wharton's Birdy. Not to be missed.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429960441
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 4/1/1993
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 249
  • Sales rank: 21,095
  • File size: 327 KB

Meet the Author



JEFFREY EUGENIDES was born in Detroit and attended Brown and Stanford universities. The Virgin Suicides was published in 1993 and was adapted into a motion picture in 1999 by Sophia Coppola. His second novel, Middlesex, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2003. He joined the faculty of Princeton University in the fall of 2007.

Biography

Jeffrey Eugenides grew up in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and attended Brown and Stanford Universities. His novel Middlesex was the winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the Ambassador Book Award, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, France's Prix Medicis, and the Lambda Literary Award. It was also selected for Oprah's Book Club. Eugenides' first novel, The Virgin Suicides, was adapted into a critically-acclaimed film by Sofia Coppola. He is on the faculty of Princeton University, and lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Good To Know

Jonathan Safran Foer's novel Everything Is Illuminated grew out of his creative writing thesis project, which was advised by Joyce Carol Oates and Eugenides.

Eugenides considered becoming a priest or a monk, and worked alongside Mother Teresa in India for one week during a traveling break from college. He explained to the Calgary Herald, "I was so unformed in my personality and was trying on different personas; being a saint was a bit tight on my shoulders, though. At 20 you can really change your philosophy of the world by reading a single book, or by one chance meeting."

Eugenides, who got the idea for The Virgin Suicides when his nephew's babysitter revealed to him that she and all her siblings had attempted suicide, wrote the book while working as an administrator at the Academy of American Poets in New York. The first chapter was published in the Paris Review in 1991, getting him an agent and, two days later, a book deal.

In a 1995 piece for the New York Times entitled, "Hand Me My Air Guitar: I'm Still a Jethro Tull Fan," Eugenides paid homage to one of his favorite bands. "Being a Tull fan is a chronic condition," he wrote. "As with malaria, a swampiness reclaims the veins without warning."

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    1. Hometown:
      Princeton, NJ
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 8, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      Detroit, Michigan
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Brown University, 1983; M.A. in creative writing/English, Stanford University, 1986

First Chapter

ONE

On the morning the last Lisbon daughter took her turn at suicide-it was Mary this time, and sleeping pills, like Therese-the two paramedics arrived at the house knowing exactly where the knife drawer was, and the gas oven, and the beam in the basement from which it was possible to lie a rope. They got out of the EMS truck, as usual moving much too slowly in our opinion, and the fat one said under his breath, "This ain't TV, folks, this is how fast we go." He was carrying the heavy respirator and cardiac unit past the bushes that had grown monstrous and over the erupting lawn, tame and immaculate thirteen months earlier when the trouble began.

Cecilia, the youngest, only thirteen, had gone first, slitting her wrists like a Stoic while taking a bath, and when they found her, afloat in her pink pool, with the yellow eyes of someone possessed and her small body giving off the odor of a mature woman, the paramedics had been so frightened by her tranquillity that they had stood mesmerized. But then Mrs. Lisbon lunged in, screaming, and the reality of the room reasserted itself: blood on the bath mat; Mr. Lisbon's razor sunk in the toilet bowl, marbling the water. The paramedics fetched Cecilia out of the warm water because it quickened the bleeding, and put a tourniquet on her arm. Her wet hair hung down her back and already her extremities were blue. She didn't say a word, but when they parted her hands they found the laminated picture of the Virgin Mary she held against her budding chest.

That was in June, fish-fly season, when each year our town is covered by the flotsam of those ephemeral insects. Rising in clouds from the algae in the polluted lake, they blacken windows, coat cars and street-lamps, plaster the municipal docks and festoon the rigging of sailboats, always in the same brown ubiquity of flying scum. Mrs. Scheer, who lives down the street, told us she saw Cecilia the day before she attempted suicide. She was standing by the curb, in the antique wedding dress with the shorn hem she always wore, looking at a Thunderbird encased in fish flies. "You better get a broom, honey," Mrs. Scheer advised. But Cecilia fixed her with her spiritualist's gaze. "They're dead," she said. "They only live twenty-four hours. They hatch, they reproduce, and then they croak. They don't even get to eat."' And with that she stuck her hand into the foamy layer of bugs and cleared her initials: C.L.

We've tried to arrange the photographs chronologically, though the passage of so many years has made it difficult. A few are fuzzy but revealing nonetheless. Exhibit #1 shows the Lisbon house shortly before Cecilia's suicide attempt. It was taken by a real estate agent, Ms. Carmina D'Angelo, whom Mr. Lisbon had hired to sell the house his large family had long outgrown. As the snapshot shows, the slate roof had not yet begun to shed its shingles, the porch was still visible above the bushes, and the windows were not yet held together with strips of masking tape. A comfortable suburban home. The upper-right second-story window contains a blur that Mrs. Lisbon identified as Mary Lisbon. "She used to tease her hair because she thought it was limp," she said years later, recalling how her daughter had looked for her brief time on earth. In the photograph Mary is caught in the act of blow-drying her hair. Her head appears to be on fire but that is only a trick of the light. It was June 13, eighty-three degrees out, under sunny skies.

*

When the paramedics were satisfied they had reduced the bleeding to a trickle, they put Cecilia on a stretcher and carried her out of the house to the truck in the driveway. She looked like a tiny Cleopatra on an imperial litter. We saw the gangly paramedic with the Wyatt Earp mustache come out first-the one we'd call "Sheriff" when we got to know him better through these domestic tragedies-and then the fat one appeared, carrying the back end of the stretcher and stepping daintily across the lawn, peering at his police-issue shoes as though looking out for dog shit, though later, when we were better acquainted with the machinery, we knew he was checking the blood pressure gauge. Sweating and fumbling, they moved toward the shuddering, blinking truck. The fat one tripped on a lone croquet wicket. In revenge he kicked it; the wicket sprang loose, plucking up a spray of dirt, and fell with a ping on the driveway. Meanwhile, Mrs. Lisbon burst onto the porch, trailing Cecilia's flannel nightgown, and let out a long wail that stopped time. Under the molting trees and above the blazing, overexposed grass those four figures paused in tableau: the two slaves offering the victim to the altar (lifting the stretcher into the truck), the priestess brandishing the torch (waving the flannel nightgown), and the drugged virgin rising up on her elbows, with an otherworldly smile on her pale lips.

Mrs. Lisbon rode in the bark of the EMS truck, but Mr. Lisbon followed in the station wagon, observing the speed limit. Two of the Lisbon daughters were away from home, Therese in Pittsburgh at a science convention, and Bonnie at music camp, trying to learn the flute after giving up the piano (her hands were too small), the violin (her chin hurt), the guitar (her fingertips bled), and the trumpet (her upper lip swelled). Mary and Lux, hearing the siren, had run home from their voice lesson across the street with Mr. Jessup. Barging into that crowded bathroom, they registered the same shock as their parents at the sight of Cecilia with her spattered forearms and pagan nudity. Outside, they hugged on a patch of uncut grass that Butch, the brawny boy who mowed it on Saturdays, had missed. Across the street, a truckful of men from the Parks Department attended to some of our dying elms. The EMS siren shrieked, going away, and botanist and his crew withdrew their insecticide to watch the truck. When it was gone, they began spraying again. The stately elm tree, also visible in the foreground of Exhibit #1, has since succumbed to the fungus spread by Dutch elm beetles, has been cut down.

The paramedics took Cecilia to Bon Secours Hospital on Kercheval and Maumee. In the emergency room Cecilia watched the attempt to save her life with an eerie detachment. Her yellow eyes didn't blink, nor did she flinch when they stuck a needle in her arm. Dr. Armonson stitched up her wrist wounds. Within five minutes of the transfusion he declared her out of danger. Chucking her under her chin, he said, "What are you doing here, honey? You're not even old enough to know how bad life gets."

And it was then Cecilia gave orally what was to be her only form of suicide note, and a useless one at that, because she was going to live: Obviously, Doctor, she said, "you've never been a thirteen-year-old girl."

*

The Lisbon girls were thirteen (Cecilia), and fourteen (Lux), and fifteen (Bonnie), and sixteen (Mary), and seventeen (Therese). They were short, round-buttocked in denim, with roundish cheeks that recalled that same dorsal softness. Whenever we got a glimpse, their faces looked indecently revealed, as though we were used to seeing women in veils. No one could understand how Mr. and Mrs. Lisbon had produced such beautiful children. Mr. Lisbon taught high-school math. He was thin, boyish, stunned by his own gray hair. He had a high voice, and when Joe Larson told us how Mr. Lisbon had cried when Lux was later rushed to the hospital during her own suicide scare, we could easily imagine the sound of his girlish weeping.

Whenever we saw Mrs. Lisbon we looked in vain for some sign of the beauty that must have once been hers. But the plump arms, the brutally cut steel-wool hair, and the librarian's glasses foiled us every time. We saw her only rarely, in the morning, fully dressed though the sun hadn't come up, stepping out to snatch up the dewy milk cartons, or on Sundays when the family drove in their paneled station wagon to St. Paul's Catholic Church on the Lake. On those mornings Mrs. Lisbon assumed a queenly iciness. Clutching her good purse, she checked each daughter for signs of makeup before allowing her to get in the car, and it was not unusual for her to send Lux back inside to put on a less revealing top. None of us went to church, so we had a lot of time to watch them, the two parents leached of color, like photographic negatives, and then the five glittering daughters in their homemade dresses, all lace and ruffle, bursting with their fructifying flesh.

Only one boy had ever been allowed in the house. Peter Sissen had helped Mr. Lisbon install a working model of the solar system in his classroom at school, and in return Mr. Lisbon had invited him for dinner. He told us the girls had kicked him continually under the table, from every direction, so that he couldn't tell who was doing it. They gazed at him with their blue febrile eyes and smiled, showing their crowded teeth, the only feature of the Liabon girls we could ever find fault with. Bonnie was the only one who didn't give Peter Sissen a secret look or kick. She only said grace and ate her food silently, lost in the piety of a fifteen-year-old. After the meal Peter Sissen asked to go to the bathroom, and because Therese and Mary were both in the downstairs one, giggling and whispering, he had to use the girls', upstairs. He came back to us with stories of bedrooms filled with crumpled panties, of stuffed animals hugged to death by the passion of the girls, of a crucifix draped with a brassiere, of gauzy chambers of canopied beds, and of the effluvia of so many young girls becoming women together in the same cramped space. In the bathroom, running the faucet to cloak the sounds of his search, Peter Sissen found Mary Lisbon's secret cache of cosmetics tied up in a sock under the sink: tubes of red lipstick and the second skin of blush and base, and the depilatory wax that informed us she had a mustache we had never seen. In fact, we didn't know whose makeup Peter Sissen had found until we saw Mary Lisbon two weeks later on the pier with a crimson mouth that matched the shade of his descriptions.

Copyright (c) 1993 by Jeffrey Eugenides"

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 276 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 277 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 28, 2012

    The Teenage Girl Trough a Remarkably Perceptive Eye.

    This novel's strength comes from an unsuspected place; the beautiful, and insightful prose of its narrators. From the eyes of teenage boys, unnoticed, but faithful to the girls we learn more about the psyche of teenage girls than almost any other novel I have read. Capturing the essence of suburban life in 70's America Eugenides's voice draws you into the haunting world of the Lisbon girls as they spiral down in depression, eventually ending in their mass suicide. Rather than depressing, this novel reads like a hazy dream, with moments of perceived clarity. Like the narrator we never quite understand the motivation intellectually, though you are left with the feeling that you understand why they did. That the world was too bothersome, their life too oppressing. It deals with the themes of sexuality, and freedom and confident applied to these girls. You are left astonished by this novel, wanting to close your own curtains to it as if you are the neighbor across the street who wants nothing more to do with the tragedy.
    - Cara Schumann

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    Depressing...

    I say first, Eugenides is a great storyteller. Well written, draws you in, descriptive. But this is not a great story. These boys aren't realistic, holding hands, fretting about the neighbor girls, stealing their stuff (makeup? Shoes?) to idolize it. Weird boys worshipping weirder girls for no apparent reason other than they have to to make the book go. Nothing gets resolved but luckily there wasnt a big mystery to begin with so i didnt care. I felt depressed by the end--i'm not looking for happy endings when i read, but also not looking for anticlimactic absence of caring. I'd read another book from him, but their stoylines seem like real downers too, so no thanks.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2012

    Chilling and captivating

    Great book. I love the story and the sisters are beautifully written. Always read the book before watching a movie. Definitely a rule to live by.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2012

    Its only 170 pages but it has taken me forever to read this thin

    Its only 170 pages but it has taken me forever to read this thing. Its like wading through quicksand. I really don't see why this book is such a big deal. Boring, uninteresting and goes on for way too long.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    although interesting...somewhat, the author just rambles on and

    although interesting...somewhat, the author just rambles on and on and on and on. I found myself skipping paragraphs in a book for the first time ever. you could skip entire pages and miss nothing. it dragged on about unimportant subjects. found myself begging for it to end because it kept going.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Virgin Suicides

    Oh my god. Wow.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    great book

    wonderful book, writing well done but i dont think its for people who just want to read with out mutch thought. alot like Middlesex

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2012

    I thought reading the book would help answer questions I had abo

    I thought reading the book would help answer questions I had about the movie but I was dead wrong. Skip entire sections of the big because it was pointless details. I eventually abandoned the book.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    An Excellent Read

    I just finished this and enjoyed it very much. Character development was outstanding. I found myself wanting to read it at every possible moment as tension was skillfully applied by the author. This may be one that I will re-read. Excellent...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2011

    Excellent Read

    One of the best books I've ever read. It doesn't offer a real explanation, but some of us "just get it". The Libson girls are brilliantly portrayed, and the confusion revolving around their acts is what you might expect from anyone. The nameless narrator give you a look into his home town and the girls down the street, while never really understanding why, they did what they did, though you can certainly speculate. It's a wonderful book that deals with uncomfortable subject matter. I have suggested it many many times, and likely will again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2014

    Amazing.

    Such a wonderful book! I couldn't put it down. I'd recommend this book to anyone, and I am definitely buying more from this author.

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  • Posted September 24, 2013

    I really enjoyed this book.  It kept me reading and wondering.  

    I really enjoyed this book.  It kept me reading and wondering.  I am not one to write a book report when leaving reviews, in short i would recommend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2013

    One of the most amazing, intoxicating books ever

    This story is so strange and so moving and so cool all at the same time and you won't be able to put it down. When you finish it its one of those stories that sticks with you.... and a part of you wants to stay in that world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    Great

    Fascinating and dark. Gripping. Must read!

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  • Posted May 26, 2013

    While it has an interesting story line, the book was far too dru

    While it has an interesting story line, the book was far too drug-out. Eugenides goes into way too much pointless detail about every little thing. The boys were unrealistic and there was no character development whatsoever. I remained unattached the entire book and won't be picking it up to read again. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Absolutely captivating

    The sense of mystery allowed a feeling of beauty to be felt throughout the story, the 5 sisters were fabricated in a chilling way
    xoxo

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  • Posted August 16, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    I expected something else. Maybe its my own fault for watching t

    I expected something else. Maybe its my own fault for watching the movie
    and then picking up the book. Like other reviewers mentioned it goes on
    and drags on. Im reading just to finish...I was hoping for more insight
    into the movie but the movie I think carried true to the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2012

    This is absolutely my favourite book. It is beautifully written,

    This is absolutely my favourite book. It is beautifully written, and haunting in an odd way that makes the reader become just as obsessed with the Lisbon sisters as the boys are.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    Awful!

    This is one of the most boring books I have ever stuck with. Had it been a library book I would have returned it. MIDDLE SEX was a favorite book for me, this did not measure up what so ever.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2012

    Amazing

    An amazing tale of the documentation of five sisters and their tragic deaths. Jeffrey Euginides' novel has sparked controversy. His book is captivating and beautiful, a hypnotizing account sealed in the memories of young boys. The Lisbon sisters will always be a mystery, and their legacy will "live" forever on bookshelves, and Jeffrey Euginides will no doubt go down in history as the author of timeless classics.

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