Virology: Principles and Applications / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$33.51
(Save 59%)
Est. Return Date: 10/31/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$57.87
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$47.50
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $9.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 87%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $9.99   
  • New (2) from $145.00   
  • Used (5) from $9.99   

Overview

Virology: Principles and Applications is a clear and accessible introduction to this fast-moving field, providing a comprehensive resource enabling the reader to understand the key concepts surrounding this exciting subject. The reader is introduced to the principles of virus structure, replication and genetics, along with the theories behind the origins of viruses and how they are evolving. Taking a modern approach to the subject, the relevance of virology to everyday life is clearly emphasized and discussions of emerging viruses, cancer, vaccines, anti-viral drugs and gene vectors are included. To enhance student understanding, learning outcomes, sources of further information and 'at-a-glance' sections are integrated into in each chapter, reinforcing key concepts.

Illustrated in full color throughout, extensive use is made of clear diagrams that include standard color coding for different types of molecule, enabling students to grasp difficult concepts and deal with the level of detail in the subject.

An invaluable text for students of biology, microbiology, molecular biology and biomedical sciences taking courses in virology. The book is also a useful resource for MSc level students looking for an accessible introduction to the subject.

  • a student-friendly introduction to the fast-moving subject of virology
  • introduces the relevance of virology to the modern world including latest developments in the field
  • looks at topical viruses such as HIV and influenza virus
  • illustrated in full color throughout with diagrams labeled clearly to enhance student understanding
  • provides a comprehensive Virologists? Vocabulary
  • The companion web site www.wiley.com/go/carter provides self-assessment questions and answers, additional reference sources and links to various virology web sites
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Rebecca T. Horvat, PhD, D (ABMM)(University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: This basic overview of virology for undergraduate students covers topics from the various viral structures, the attachment of viruses to host cells, the great variety of viral genomes, and the effect of viruses on host cells and viral vaccine development.
Purpose: This book is designed for students who have not had extensive exposure to virus biology. This type of solid foundation is critical to introducing young scientists to the world of microorganisms.
Audience: It is primarily written for undergraduate university/college students. It does not have the depth for an advanced virology course, but it provides a very good starting point which is vital to establishing a knowledge base.
Features: The book starts with the importance of viruses to life on earth. This is followed by a methods section so that the student will understand how viruses are investigated in a research laboratory. The next several chapters go into specific biochemical detail on the variety of viral life cycles, the replication of viral particles, and host recognition and attachment. The diagrams are well designed and enhance the text, helping students understand these difficult concepts. The remaining chapters cover the major human viral pathogens in greater detail. Additional interesting chapters cover bacterial phages, the evolution of viruses, antiviral therapy, and vaccines. Each chapter begins with a summary ends with learning expectations. A helpful feature is a section at the end of the book called "Virologist's vocabulary," which gives clear definitions of commonly used terms.
Assessment: This is one of the best undergraduate textbooks specifically for virology that I have reviewed. I especially appreciate the well designed figures and diagrams. The book is clearly written and it would be enjoyable to use for teaching.
From the Publisher
"This excellent text is largely about the molecular biology of viruses…. A succinct text that describes modern virology. The text is illustrated by copious diagrams, mostly in colour." (Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, February 2009)

"The text has been written with clarity and in an extremely accessible manner." (Society for General Microbiology, February 2008)

"This is one of the best undergraduate textbooks specifically for virology…" (Doody's Health Services)

From The Critics
Reviewer: Rebecca T. Horvat, PhD, D(ABMM)(University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: This basic overview of virology for undergraduate students covers topics from the various viral structures, the attachment of viruses to host cells, the great variety of viral genomes, and the effect of viruses on host cells and viral vaccine development.
Purpose: This book is designed for students who have not had extensive exposure to virus biology. This type of solid foundation is critical to introducing young scientists to the world of microorganisms.
Audience: It is primarily written for undergraduate university/college students. It does not have the depth for an advanced virology course, but it provides a very good starting point which is vital to establishing a knowledge base.
Features: The book starts with the importance of viruses to life on earth. This is followed by a methods section so that the student will understand how viruses are investigated in a research laboratory. The next several chapters go into specific biochemical detail on the variety of viral life cycles, the replication of viral particles, and host recognition and attachment. The diagrams are well designed and enhance the text, helping students understand these difficult concepts. The remaining chapters cover the major human viral pathogens in greater detail. Additional interesting chapters cover bacterial phages, the evolution of viruses, antiviral therapy, and vaccines. Each chapter begins with a summary ends with learning expectations. A helpful feature is a section at the end of the book called "Virologist's vocabulary," which gives clear definitions of commonly used terms.
Assessment: This is one of the best undergraduate textbooks specifically for virology that I have reviewed. I especially appreciate the well designed figures and diagrams. The book is clearly written and it would be enjoyable to use for teaching.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470023877
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/24/2007
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.60 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr John Carter and Prof Venetia Saunders, Both at School of Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, UK.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface.

Abbreviations used in this book.

Greek letters used in this book.

Colour coding for molecules.

1 Viruses and their importance.

1.1 Viruses are ubiquitous on Earth.

1.2 Reasons for studying viruses.

1.3 The nature of viruses.

1.4 The remainder of the book.

2 Methods used in virology.

2.1 Introduction to methods used in virology.

2.2 Cultivation of viruses.

2.3 Isolation of viruses.

2.4 Centrifugation.

2.5 Structural investigations of cells and virions.

2.6 Electrophoretic techniques.

2.7 Detection of viruses and virus components.

2.8 Infectivity assays.

2.9 Virus genetics.

3 Virus structure.

3.1 Introduction to virus structure.

3.2 Virus genomes.

3.3 Virus proteins.

3.4 Capsids.

3.5 Virion membranes.

3.6 Occlusion bodies.

3.7 Other virion components.

4 Virus transmission.

4.1 Introduction to virus transmission.

4.2 Transmission of plant viruses.

4.3 Transmission of vertebrate viruses.

4.4 Transmission of invertebrate viruses.

4.5 Permissive cells.

5 Attachment and entry of viruses into cells.

5.1 Overview of virus replication.

5.2 Animal viruses.

5.3 Bacteriophages.

6 Transcription, translation and transport.

6.1 Introduction to transcription, translation and transport.

6.2 Transcription of virus genomes.

6.3 Transcription in eukaryotes.

6.4 Translation in eukaryotes.

6.5 Transport in eukaryotic cells.

6.6 Transcription and translation in bacteria.

7 Virus genome replication.

7.1 Overview of virus genome replication.

7.2 Locations of virus genome replication in eukaryotic cells.

7.3 Initiation of genome replication.

7.4 Polymerases.

7.5 DNA replication.

7.6 Double-stranded RNA replication.

7.7 Single-stranded RNA replication.

7.8 Reverse transcription.

8 Assembly and exit of virions from cells.

8.1 Introduction to assembly and exit of virions from cells.

8.2 Nucleocapsid assembly.

8.3 Formation of virion membranes.

8.4 Virion exit from the infected cell.

9 Outcomes of infection for the host.

9.1 Introduction to outcomes of infection for the host.

9.2 Factors affecting outcomes of infection.

9.3 Non-productive infections.

9.4 Productive infections.

10 Classification and nomenclature of viruses.

10.1 History of virus classification and nomenclature.

10.2 Modern virus classification and nomenclature.

10.3 Baltimore classification of viruses.

11 Herpesviruses (and other dsDNA viruses).

11.1 Introduction to herpesviruses.

11.2 The human herpesviruses.

11.3 The herpesvirus virion.

11.4 HSV-1 genome organization.

11.5 HSV-1 replication.

11.6 Latent herpesvirus infection.

11.7 Other dsDNA viruses.

12 Parvoviruses (and other ssDNA viruses).

12.1 Introduction to parvoviruses.

12.2 Examples of parvoviruses.

12.3 Parvovirus virion.

12.4 Parvovirus replication.

12.5 Other ssDNA viruses.

13 Reoviruses (and other dsRNA viruses).

13.1 Introduction to reoviruses.

13.2 Rotavirus virion.

13.3 Rotavirus replication.

13.4 Other dsRNA viruses.

14 Picornaviruses (and other plus-strand RNA viruses).

14.1 Introduction to picornaviruses.

14.2 Some important picornaviruses.

14.3 The picornavirus virion.

14.4 Picornavirus replication.

14.5 Picornavirus recombination.

14.6 Picornavirus experimental systems

14.7 Other plus-strand RNA viruses.

15 Rhabdoviruses (and other minus-strand RNA viruses).

15.1 Introduction to rhabdoviruses.

15.2 Some important rhabdoviruses.

15.3 The rhabdovirus virion and genome organization.

15.4 Rhabdovirus replication.

15.5 Other minus-strand RNA viruses.

15.6 Viruses with ambisense genomes.

15.7 Reverse genetics.

16 Retroviruses.

16.1 Introduction to retroviruses.

16.2 Retrovirus virion.

16.3 Retrovirus replication.

16.4 Examples of retroviruses.

16.5 Retroviruses as gene vectors.

16.6 Endogenous retroviruses.

17 Human immunodeficiency viruses.

17.1 Introduction to HIV.

17.2 HIV virion.

17.3 HIV genome.

17.4 HIV-1 replication.

17.5 HIV-1 variability.

17.6 Progression of HIV infection.

17.7 Prevention of HIV transmission.

18 Hepadnaviruses (and other reverse-transcribing DNA viruses).

18.1 Introduction to hepadnaviruses.

18.2 Importance of HBV.

18.3 HBV virion.

18.4 Non-infectious particles.

18.5 Soluble virus protein.

18.6 HBV genome.

18.7 HBV genetic groups.

18.8 HBV replication cycle.

18.9 Prevention and treatment of HBV infection.

18.10 Other reverse-transcribing DNA viruses.

19 Bacterial viruses.

19.1 Introduction to bacterial viruses (bacteriophages.

RNA PHAGES.

19.2 Single-stranded RNA phages.

19.3 Double-stranded RNA phages.

DNA PHAGES.

19.4 Single-stranded DNA phages.

19.5 Double-stranded DNA phages.

20 Origins and evolution of viruses.

21.1 Introduction to origins and evolution of viruses.

20.2 Origins of viruses.

20.3 Evolution of viruses.

21 Emerging viruses.

21.1 Introduction to emerging viruses

21.2 Viruses in new host species

21.3 Viruses in new areas

21.4 Viruses in new host species and in new areas

21.5 New viruses

21.6 Recently discovered virus

21.7 Re-emerging viruses

21.8 Virus surveillance

21.9 Dealing with outbreaks

22 Viruses and cancer

22.1 Introduction to viruses and cancer

22.2 Papillomavirus-linked cancers

22.3 Polyomavirus-linked cancers

22.4 Epstein-Barr virus-linked cancers

22.5 Kaposi’s sarcoma

22.6 Adult T cell leukaemia

22.7 Hepatocellular carcinoma

22.8 Virus-associated cancers in animals

22.9 Cell lines derived from virus-associated cancers.

22.10 How do viruses cause cancer?

22.11 Prevention of virus-induced cancers.

23 Survival of infectivity.

23.1 Preservation of virus infectivity.

23.2 Destruction of virus infectivity.

23.3 Inactivation targets in virions.

23.4 Inactivation kinetics.

23.5 Agents that inactivate virus infectivity.

24 Virus vaccines.

24.1 Introduction to virus vaccines.

24.2 Live attenuated virus vaccines.

24.3 Inactivated virus vaccines.

24.4 Virion subunit vaccines.

24.5 Live recombinant virus vaccines.

24.6 Mass production of viruses for vaccines.

24.7 Virus-like particles.

24.8 Synthetic peptide vaccines.

24.9 DNA vaccines.

24.10 Storage and transport of vaccines.

25 Anti-viral drugs.

25.1 Introduction to anti-viral drugs.

25.2 Development of anti-viral drugs.

25.3 Examples of anti-viral drugs.

25.4 Drug resistance.

25.5 Anti-viral drug research.

26 Prions.

26.1 Introduction to prions.

26.2 Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

26.3 The nature of prions.

26.4 Prion diseases.

26.5 Prion strains.

26.6 Prion transmission.

26.7 The protein-only hypothesis.

Learning outcomes.

Sources of further information.

Virologists' vocabulary.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2007

    Good for introductory virology courses

    This is great introductory virology book, but if you are looking for something more comprehensive, I would look somewhere else if you want a more detailed explanation. I do have to say that of the virology textbooks that I have looked at the organization and layout of this book is outstanding

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)