Virus Taxonomy: Classification and Nomenclature of Viruses

Virus Taxonomy: Classification and Nomenclature of Viruses

by Frederik A. Murphy
     
 

Rapid developments continue to take place in the research of viruses, the causative agents of infectious diseases in humans, animals, plants, invertebrates, protozoa, fungi, and bacteria. A still growing number of more than 30,000 viruses, virus strains, and subtypes are being tracked in various specialty laboratories and culture collections. In this situation of

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Overview

Rapid developments continue to take place in the research of viruses, the causative agents of infectious diseases in humans, animals, plants, invertebrates, protozoa, fungi, and bacteria. A still growing number of more than 30,000 viruses, virus strains, and subtypes are being tracked in various specialty laboratories and culture collections. In this situation of expansion and specialization, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses was founded to establish, refine and maintain a universal virus taxonomy system giving information to virologists about the characteristics of the different groups of viruses.
The Committee’s Sixth Report includes one order, 71 families, 11 subfamilies, and 175 genera and more than 4,000 member viruses. On 600 printed pages large amounts of molecular biologic data, illustrated by micrographs and virion diagrams, gene maps and tables give a comprehensive overview and prove helpful in teaching, in diagnostics, in scholarly research, and in the practical areas of medicine, veterinary medicine, plant pathology, insect pest management, and biotechnology.
"... est une référence indispensable pour les chercheurs, les enseignants, les médecins ou les vétérinaires mais aussi pour les étudiants et d’une manière générale pour toutes les personnes intéressées par la virologie”. Revue de Médecine Vétérinaire
"... an excellent, well presented and informative volume. The report should be an essential reference volume for any department or organization involved in the study of viruses”. Quarterly

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Thomas M. Gallagher, PhD (Loyola University Medical Center)
Description: This book contains essential reference information on all viruses currently known and provides a basis for naming and classifying these viruses. It is the sixth report of its kind compiled by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV).
Purpose: The purpose is to provide an objective and pragmatic system for classifying and characterizing the viruses. The work represents a consensus system agreed on by preeminent investigators in the field. Reports by the ICTV are increasingly relevant to the discipline because virologists are now able to recognize broad common characteristics among many different virus families.
Audience: This book is useful for both students and practitioners of virology because it both describes the viruses and sorts them into an internationally recognized framework. The committee of authors comprise the current leaders in the field, and they write careful, thorough reviews of the viruses.
Features: For each virus family there are about two pertinent illustrations; references are restricted to those articles considered best at aiding classification. The book is difficult to navigate from the table of contents, but any virus can be accessed from the index.
Assessment: This book provides an excellent overview of virus taxonomy and also presents data on individual viruses. It is essential for any laboratory engaged in virus research as well as for any instructor of virology. This edition is especially attractive because it presents previously unavailable detail on virus structure and function.
Thomas M. Gallagher
This book contains essential reference information on all viruses currently known and provides a basis for naming and classifying these viruses. It is the sixth report of its kind compiled by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). The purpose is to provide an objective and pragmatic system for classifying and characterizing the viruses. The work represents a consensus system agreed on by preeminent investigators in the field. Reports by the ICTV are increasingly relevant to the discipline because virologists are now able to recognize broad common characteristics among many different virus families. This book is useful for both students and practitioners of virology because it both describes the viruses and sorts them into an internationally recognized framework. The committee of authors comprise the current leaders in the field, and they write careful, thorough reviews of the viruses. For each virus family there are about two pertinent illustrations; references are restricted to those articles considered best at aiding classification. The book is difficult to navigate from the table of contents, but any virus can be accessed from the index. This book provides an excellent overview of virus taxonomy and also presents data on individual viruses. It is essential for any laboratory engaged in virus research as well as for any instructor of virology. This edition is especially attractive because it presents previously unavailable detail on virus structure and function.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783211825945
Publisher:
Springer Vienna
Publication date:
05/28/1995
Series:
Archives of Virology. Supplementa Series, #10
Edition description:
Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1995
Pages:
586
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.66(h) x (d)

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