Visconti Tarots

( 1 )

Overview

An absolutely stunning display of lavish gold foil and exquisite Renaissance art, this deck is pure magic and mystery! The shimmering gold reflects the light, seducing the intuition and delighting the eye. This deck is a treasure, truly a must-have for all Tarot enthusiasts. Originally commissioned in 1450 by the Duke of Milan, and attributed to Bonifacio Bembo, this is a reproduction of the oldest extant ...

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Overview

An absolutely stunning display of lavish gold foil and exquisite Renaissance art, this deck is pure magic and mystery! The shimmering gold reflects the light, seducing the intuition and delighting the eye. This deck is a treasure, truly a must-have for all Tarot enthusiasts. Originally commissioned in 1450 by the Duke of Milan, and attributed to Bonifacio Bembo, this is a reproduction of the oldest extant Tarot deck.

This product includes 78 full-color cards and 9 cards with instructions. No booklet included.

Publisher Review:

When I was in high school, I was fortunate enough to take a trip through Europe. I desperately wanted to see some of the famous sites. I ended up disappointed with many of them. The Leaning Tower of Pisa was just an old building falling on its side. The Eiffel Tower was an enormous rusty hunk of metal. The Mona Lisa was dark, dingy, and criss-crossed with hairline cracks. The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel was likewise dark and dismal with muted colors (it’s been cleaned since I was there). The truth is that great works of art and architecture age and need to be cared for. Most art does not receive the appropriate care.

Perhaps the oldest—and certainly the most complete—example we have of the Tarot is known by a variety of names. Attributed to Bonifacio Bembo, they were commissioned in 1450 for Filippo Maria Visconti, the Duke of Milan, Italy. Because they weren’t finished until his successor, Francesco Sforza, was in office, this deck is often called the Visconti-Sforza Tarot or simply the Visconti Tarot. Today [read more]

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738700199
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2000
  • Edition description: CARDS
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 819,387
  • Product dimensions: 2.62 (w) x 4.62 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

Since 1987, Art Publisher Lo Scarabeo has published over 100 Tarot decks that have been acclaimed all over the world for originality and quality. Only the best Italian and International artists are selected for our new decks, and the result is that Lo Scarabeo's decks are all recognizable as an exceptional artistic value.

Tradition
One of Lo Scarabeo's goals is the preservation of traditional Tarot decks.

Development
New decks and ideas are continually gathered from all over the world. This allows Lo Scarabeo to produce some of the most innovative decks available today.

Quality
Lo Scarabeo is committed to ever increasing quality and beauty of their products.

Distribution
*Llewellyn is the exclusive distributor of Lo Scarabeo products in North America.

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Read an Excerpt

Summary:
An amazing and beautiful recreation of one of the oldest and most complete Tarot decks extant. Suitable for any reading for which you might use a Rider-Waite-Smith-based deck, it’s also ideal for working in costume, at renaissance fairs, etc. The beauty and textures of this deck is incredibly involving and can take you in new directions.

In-Depth Review:

Perhaps the oldest—and certainly the most complete—example we have of the Tarot is known by a variety of names. Attributed to Bonifacio Bembo, they were commissioned in 1450 for Filippo Maria Visconti, the Duke of Milan, Italy. Because they weren’t finished until his successor, Francesco Sforza, was in office, this deck is often called the Visconti-Sforza Tarot or simply the Visconti Tarot. Today, part of the deck is housed in the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, part is kept at the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo, and the rest are held in the private collection of the Colleoni family also of Bergamo. As a result of its current ownership, it is also known as the Morgan-Bergamo version of the Tarot.

After over half a millennium, the original artwork shows its age. There are a few reproductions of this deck available, and they are, at best, historical oddities. To return it to its full glory required not a reproduction, but a careful recreation. Further, four cards—the Devil, the Tower, the 3 of Swords and the Knight of Pentacles—are missing and needed to be invented based on the artistic styles and art of that era and the other cards of this deck.

That is why you'll be absolutely amazed at the Visconti Tarots deck so lovingly and energetically recreated by Bulgarian artist A.A. Atanassov. To say he has brought new life to this deck is such a total understatement that it’s almost embarrassing to put it forward. If you have seen any of the reproductions and try to compare it to this deck you may wonder if they are the same deck. This isn’t because the imagery is different, but rather because Atanassov not only returns this deck to its original glory, but it actually reveals the original concepts in a way that could have only be achieved by viewing the original art when it was first displayed.

Lost in the reproductions and now finally revealed is the typical intricacy of the artistic style of the time. But Atanassov extends this by presenting some of the backgrounds in metallic gold. This is not a simple flat wash as is sometimes done on book covers, for even the gold has patterns within it. Photos of this deck simply do not reveal the patterns hidden in the gold stamping and the only way to reveal it is by moving the cards under a bright light and is found on the court cards and Major Arcana. When someone says "pictures don’t do it justice" about this deck, that person is being modest. Pictures can’t do it justice. The intricacies of patterns continue on the ornate backs of the deck which looks like a tapestry waiting to be raised on a castle’s wall.

Most Tarot decks have names and numbers of the cards at the top or bottom of each card so they can be easily identified. In this deck all of the identifications run along the left side of the cards, keep the words from interfering with your interpretation or appreciation of the art.

Pick up a card, look at it under light to see the patterns in the metallic golden ink, and you'll get "lost" in the enjoyment of the intricacies of the card. Doing this will often lead you to have an "Aha! I never saw that before" moment with this deck. "Hmmm. The Fool has feathers in his hair and his pants hanging below his knees. What is he up to? What’s that thing beneath the Magician’s hand? The High Priestess reminds one of the Female Pope legend—and she’s clearly pregnant. For in-depth study you should either get the book designed to accompany this deck.

The Little White Booklet that accompanies the deck when you get it by itself includes a bit of history and information, divinatory meanings and a five card position spread. The instructions for using this spread are interesting. You separate the Majors and Minors. Then you only use the suit associated with your question, followed by just the Majors, giving you ten cards on the five-position spread. This technique can be added to any Tarot reading that answers a question.

You're going to love this deck and return to it frequently. You'll be amazed at the beauty and texture of the art and gold stamping. It’s especially appropriate for use at Renaissance fairs and other period events.

Deck Attributes
Name of deck: Visconti Tarots
Publisher: Lo Scarabeo
Artist: Atanas Alexander Atanassov
ISBN: 9780738700199
Name of accompanying book/booklet: Visconti Tarot
Number of pages of book/booklet: 64 (14 in English)
Available in a boxed kit?: No, however beside distributing the deck, Llewellyn also offers a full-size book on this deck, a miniature version of the deck, and a large version (almost 6" tall) of just the Major Arcana cards.
Reading Uses: General purpose Tarot deck
Ethnic Focus: European
Artistic Style: Renaissance
Theme: A recreation of one of the earliest known Tarot decks
Tarot, Divination Deck, Other: Tarot
Does it follow Rider-Waite-Smith Standard?: Yes, but as with all pre-RWS decks, the numeration of Justice and Strength is exchanged.
Does it have extra cards?: No
Does it have alternate names for Major Arcana cards?: No.
Does it have alternate names for Minor Arcana suits?: No
Does it have alternate names for the Court Cards? If yes, what are they?: The RWS Pages are here called "Knaves."
Book suggestions for Tarot beginners and this deck: How to Read the Tarot by Sylvia Abraham; Tarot Plain and Simple by Anthony Louis
Book suggestions for experienced Tarot users and this deck: The Complete Book of Tarot Reversals by Mary K. Greer; Twenty Years of Tarot by Lo Scarabeo.
Alternative decks you might like:
Medieval Tarot Universal Marseille Tarot Tarot of the Renaissance Ancient Italian Tarots Ancient Tarot of Lombardy

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Table of Contents

Summary:
An amazing and beautiful recreation of one of the oldest and most complete Tarot decks extant. Suitable for any reading for which you might use a Rider-Waite-Smith-based deck, it’s also ideal for working in costume, at renaissance fairs, etc. The beauty and textures of this deck is incredibly involving and can take you in new directions.

In-Depth Review:

Perhaps the oldest—and certainly the most complete—example we have of the Tarot is known by a variety of names. Attributed to Bonifacio Bembo, they were commissioned in 1450 for Filippo Maria Visconti, the Duke of Milan, Italy. Because they weren’t finished until his successor, Francesco Sforza, was in office, this deck is often called the Visconti-Sforza Tarot or simply the Visconti Tarot. Today, part of the deck is housed in the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, part is kept at the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo, and the rest are held in the private collection of the Colleoni family also of Bergamo. As a result of its current ownership, it is also known as the Morgan-Bergamo version of the Tarot.

After over half a millennium, the original artwork shows its age. There are a few reproductions of this deck available, and they are, at best, historical oddities. To return it to its full glory required not a reproduction, but a careful recreation. Further, four cards—the Devil, the Tower, the 3 of Swords and the Knight of Pentacles—are missing and needed to be invented based on the artistic styles and art of that era and the other cards of this deck.

That is why you'll be absolutely amazed at the Visconti Tarots deck so lovingly and energetically recreated by Bulgarian artist A.A. Atanassov. To say he has brought new life to this deck is such a total understatement that it’s almost embarrassing to put it forward. If you have seen any of the reproductions and try to compare it to this deck you may wonder if they are the same deck. This isn’t because the imagery is different, but rather because Atanassov not only returns this deck to its original glory, but it actually reveals the original concepts in a way that could have only be achieved by viewing the original art when it was first displayed.

Lost in the reproductions and now finally revealed is the typical intricacy of the artistic style of the time. But Atanassov extends this by presenting some of the backgrounds in metallic gold. This is not a simple flat wash as is sometimes done on book covers, for even the gold has patterns within it. Photos of this deck simply do not reveal the patterns hidden in the gold stamping and the only way to reveal it is by moving the cards under a bright light and is found on the court cards and Major Arcana. When someone says "pictures don’t do it justice" about this deck, that person is being modest. Pictures can’t do it justice. The intricacies of patterns continue on the ornate backs of the deck which looks like a tapestry waiting to be raised on a castle’s wall.

Most Tarot decks have names and numbers of the cards at the top or bottom of each card so they can be easily identified. In this deck all of the identifications run along the left side of the cards, keep the words from interfering with your interpretation or appreciation of the art.

Pick up a card, look at it under light to see the patterns in the metallic golden ink, and you'll get "lost" in the enjoyment of the intricacies of the card. Doing this will often lead you to have an "Aha! I never saw that before" moment with this deck. "Hmmm. The Fool has feathers in his hair and his pants hanging below his knees. What is he up to? What’s that thing beneath the Magician’s hand? The High Priestess reminds one of the Female Pope legend—and she’s clearly pregnant. For in-depth study you should either get the book designed to accompany this deck.

The Little White Booklet that accompanies the deck when you get it by itself includes a bit of history and information, divinatory meanings and a five card position spread. The instructions for using this spread are interesting. You separate the Majors and Minors. Then you only use the suit associated with your question, followed by just the Majors, giving you ten cards on the five-position spread. This technique can be added to any Tarot reading that answers a question.

You're going to love this deck and return to it frequently. You'll be amazed at the beauty and texture of the art and gold stamping. It’s especially appropriate for use at Renaissance fairs and other period events.

Deck Attributes
Name of deck: Visconti Tarots
Publisher: Lo Scarabeo
Artist: Atanas Alexander Atanassov
ISBN: 9780738700199
Name of accompanying book/booklet: Visconti Tarot
Number of pages of book/booklet: 64 (14 in English)
Available in a boxed kit?: No, however beside distributing the deck, Llewellyn also offers a full-size book on this deck, a miniature version of the deck, and a large version (almost 6" tall) of just the Major Arcana cards.
Reading Uses: General purpose Tarot deck
Ethnic Focus: European
Artistic Style: Renaissance
Theme: A recreation of one of the earliest known Tarot decks
Tarot, Divination Deck, Other: Tarot
Does it follow Rider-Waite-Smith Standard?: Yes, but as with all pre-RWS decks, the numeration of Justice and Strength is exchanged.
Does it have extra cards?: No
Does it have alternate names for Major Arcana cards?: No.
Does it have alternate names for Minor Arcana suits?: No
Does it have alternate names for the Court Cards? If yes, what are they?: The RWS Pages are here called "Knaves."
Book suggestions for Tarot beginners and this deck: How to Read the Tarot by Sylvia Abraham; Tarot Plain and Simple by Anthony Louis
Book suggestions for experienced Tarot users and this deck: The Complete Book of Tarot Reversals by Mary K. Greer; Twenty Years of Tarot by Lo Scarabeo.
Alternative decks you might like:
Medieval Tarot Universal Marseille Tarot Tarot of the Renaissance Ancient Italian Tarots Ancient Tarot of Lombardy

Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

Summary:
An amazing and beautiful recreation of one of the oldest and most complete Tarot decks extant. Suitable for any reading for which you might use a Rider-Waite-Smith-based deck, it’s also ideal for working in costume, at renaissance fairs, etc. The beauty and textures of this deck is incredibly involving and can take you in new directions.

In-Depth Review:

Perhaps the oldest—and certainly the most complete—example we have of the Tarot is known by a variety of names. Attributed to Bonifacio Bembo, they were commissioned in 1450 for Filippo Maria Visconti, the Duke of Milan, Italy. Because they weren’t finished until his successor, Francesco Sforza, was in office, this deck is often called the Visconti-Sforza Tarot or simply the Visconti Tarot. Today, part of the deck is housed in the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, part is kept at the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo, and the rest are held in the private collection of the Colleoni family also of Bergamo. As a result of its current ownership, it is also known as the Morgan-Bergamo version of the Tarot.

After over half a millennium, the original artwork shows its age. There are a few reproductions of this deck available, and they are, at best, historical oddities. To return it to its full glory required not a reproduction, but a careful recreation. Further, four cards—the Devil, the Tower, the 3 of Swords and the Knight of Pentacles—are missing and needed to be invented based on the artistic styles and art of that era and the other cards of this deck.

That is why you'll be absolutely amazed at the Visconti Tarots deck so lovingly and energetically recreated by Bulgarian artist A.A. Atanassov. To say he has brought new life to this deck is such a total understatement that it’s almost embarrassing to put it forward. If you have seen any of the reproductions and try to compare it to this deck you may wonder if they are the same deck. This isn’t because the imagery is different, but rather because Atanassov not only returns this deck to its original glory, but it actually reveals the original concepts in a way that could have only be achieved by viewing the original art when it was first displayed.

Lost in the reproductions and now finally revealed is the typical intricacy of the artistic style of the time. But Atanassov extends this by presenting some of the backgrounds in metallic gold. This is not a simple flat wash as is sometimes done on book covers, for even the gold has patterns within it. Photos of this deck simply do not reveal the patterns hidden in the gold stamping and the only way to reveal it is by moving the cards under a bright light and is found on the court cards and Major Arcana. When someone says "pictures don’t do it justice" about this deck, that person is being modest. Pictures can’t do it justice. The intricacies of patterns continue on the ornate backs of the deck which looks like a tapestry waiting to be raised on a castle’s wall.

Most Tarot decks have names and numbers of the cards at the top or bottom of each card so they can be easily identified. In this deck all of the identifications run along the left side of the cards, keep the words from interfering with your interpretation or appreciation of the art.

Pick up a card, look at it under light to see the patterns in the metallic golden ink, and you'll get "lost" in the enjoyment of the intricacies of the card. Doing this will often lead you to have an "Aha! I never saw that before" moment with this deck. "Hmmm. The Fool has feathers in his hair and his pants hanging below his knees. What is he up to? What’s that thing beneath the Magician’s hand? The High Priestess reminds one of the Female Pope legend—and she’s clearly pregnant. For in-depth study you should either get the book designed to accompany this deck.

The Little White Booklet that accompanies the deck when you get it by itself includes a bit of history and information, divinatory meanings and a five card position spread. The instructions for using this spread are interesting. You separate the Majors and Minors. Then you only use the suit associated with your question, followed by just the Majors, giving you ten cards on the five-position spread. This technique can be added to any Tarot reading that answers a question.

You're going to love this deck and return to it frequently. You'll be amazed at the beauty and texture of the art and gold stamping. It’s especially appropriate for use at Renaissance fairs and other period events.

Deck Attributes
Name of deck: Visconti Tarots
Publisher: Lo Scarabeo
Artist: Atanas Alexander Atanassov
ISBN: 9780738700199
Name of accompanying book/booklet: Visconti Tarot
Number of pages of book/booklet: 64 (14 in English)
Available in a boxed kit?: No, however beside distributing the deck, Llewellyn also offers a full-size book on this deck, a miniature version of the deck, and a large version (almost 6" tall) of just the Major Arcana cards.
Reading Uses: General purpose Tarot deck
Ethnic Focus: European
Artistic Style: Renaissance
Theme: A recreation of one of the earliest known Tarot decks
Tarot, Divination Deck, Other: Tarot
Does it follow Rider-Waite-Smith Standard?: Yes, but as with all pre-RWS decks, the numeration of Justice and Strength is exchanged.
Does it have extra cards?: No
Does it have alternate names for Major Arcana cards?: No.
Does it have alternate names for Minor Arcana suits?: No
Does it have alternate names for the Court Cards? If yes, what are they?: The RWS Pages are here called "Knaves."
Book suggestions for Tarot beginners and this deck: How to Read the Tarot by Sylvia Abraham; Tarot Plain and Simple by Anthony Louis
Book suggestions for experienced Tarot users and this deck: The Complete Book of Tarot Reversals by Mary K. Greer; Twenty Years of Tarot by Lo Scarabeo.
Alternative decks you might like:
Medieval Tarot
Universal Marseille Tarot
Tarot of the Renaissance
Ancient Italian Tarots
Ancient Tarot of Lombardy

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    Not recommended

    I liked this version before because it looked so authenic and "old world." And easy to read/see. But they have changed the look to have a lot of metalic gold trim and even on the pictures. I didn't like the change because it made it more difficult to read and took away from it's integrity and authenticity I felt. I ended up returning this item and purchased another version.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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