Visible Women

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Overview

How should feminist theories conceive of the subject? What is it to be a legal person? What part does embodiment play in subjectivity? Can there be a conception of rights which does justice to the social contexts in which rights claims are embedded? Is the way the law constitutes legal subjects a form of violence? These questions lie at the heart of contemporary feminist theory, and in this collection they are addressed by a group of distinguished international scholars working in law, philosophy and politics. ...
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Overview

How should feminist theories conceive of the subject? What is it to be a legal person? What part does embodiment play in subjectivity? Can there be a conception of rights which does justice to the social contexts in which rights claims are embedded? Is the way the law constitutes legal subjects a form of violence? These questions lie at the heart of contemporary feminist theory, and in this collection they are addressed by a group of distinguished international scholars working in law, philosophy and politics. The volume, in which the concerns of one author are taken up by others, advances current debate on two interconnected levels. First, it contains original and ground-breaking discussions of the questions raised above. At the same time, it contains a more reflexive strand of argument about the intellectual resources available to feminist thinkers, and the advantages and dangers of borrowing from non-feminist traditions of thought. It thus provides an exceptionally rich examination of contemporary legal and political feminist theory.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781841131955
  • Publisher: Hart Publishing (UK)
  • Publication date: 2/1/2002
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
List of Contributors
Introduction 1
1 Feminism and the Politics of Difference. Or, Where Have All the Women Gone? 11
2 The Mother of the Legal Person 29
3 Can Women be Legal Persons? 69
4 Feminism and the Promise of Human Rights: Possibilities and Paradoxes 91
5 Violence, Ethics and Law: Feminist Reflections on a Familiar Dilemma 117
6 Sexual Difference and Collective Identities: The New Global Constellation 137
7 The Politics of "Presence" and "Difference": Working Through Spinoza and Eliot 159
8 Freedom and the Imaginary 175
Index 197
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2003

    The Game is Not Over

    In the developed world, the great battles over sexual discrimination have been won by the feminists, as the 20th century ended. The suffragettes of the 19th and 20th centuries did not strive in vain. Where elections are held, women can vote, and at the same starting age as men. Contraception and abortion are mostly accessible. Women can exist as legal entities, not just as adjuncts of their spouses. Overt barriers to women have been abolished. Surely feminists can declare the game over? Well not quite. And this is really what the book is about. It has papers from a conference at Cambridge, Britain, with researchers from political science, philosophy and law. The mood seems to be of a field uncertain of its direction. Issues of pay inequity still persist in every country and most professions. At the managerial level, men still vastly outnumber women. Thus too in parliaments. In some contexts, like pregnancy, women might not have full legal status, on a par with men. How to redress these? The issues lack the rallying clarity of (say) a denial of suffrage, and thusly too there is a lack of consensus on possible solutions. In that, the book seems a good representative of current feminist thought.

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