Visions of the Land: Science, Literature, and the American Environment from the Era of Exploration to the Age of Ecology

Visions of the Land: Science, Literature, and the American Environment from the Era of Exploration to the Age of Ecology

by Michael A. Bryson
     
 

The work of John Charles Fremont, Richard Byrd, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, John Wesley Powell, Susan Cooper, Rachel Carson, and Loren Eiseley represents a widely divergent body of writing. Yet despite their range of genres—including exploration narratives, technical reports, natural histories, scientific autobiographies, fictional utopias, nature writing, and

See more details below

Overview

The work of John Charles Fremont, Richard Byrd, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, John Wesley Powell, Susan Cooper, Rachel Carson, and Loren Eiseley represents a widely divergent body of writing. Yet despite their range of genres—including exploration narratives, technical reports, natural histories, scientific autobiographies, fictional utopias, nature writing, and popular scientific literature—these seven authors produced strikingly connected representations of nature and the practice of science in America from about 1840 to 1970. Michael A. Bryson provides a thoughtful examination of the authors, their work, and the ways in which science and nature unite them.

Visions of the Land explores how our environmental attitudes have influenced and been shaped by various scientific perspectives from the time of western expansion and geographic exploration in the mid-nineteenth century to the start of the contemporary environmental movement in the twentieth century. Bryson offers a literary-critical analysis of how writers of different backgrounds, scientific training, and geographic experiences represented nature through various kinds of natural science, from natural history to cartography to resource management to ecology and evolution, and in the process, explored the possibilities and limits of science itself.

Visions of the Land examines the varied, sometimes conflicting, but always fascinating ways in which we have defined the relations among science, nature, language, and the human community. Ultimately, it is an extended meditation on the capacity of using science to live well within nature.

University of Virginia Press

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813921068
Publisher:
University of Virginia Press
Publication date:
06/28/2002
Series:
Under the Sign of Nature Series
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Michael A. Bryson is Associate Professor of Humanities at Evelyn T. Stone University College, Roosevelt University.

University of Virginia Press

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Pt. 1Narratives of Exploration and the Scientist-Hero
1"I Saw Visions": John Charles Fremont and the Explorer-Scientist as Nineteenth-Century Hero3
2"The Evidence of My Ruin": Richard Byrd's Antarctic Sojourn32
Pt. 2Imagined Communities and the Scientific Management of Nature
3"A Strange and Terrible Woman Land": Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Scientific Utopia57
4"A Unit of Country Well Defined in Nature": John Wesley Powell and the Scientific Management of the American West80
Pt. 3Nature's Identity and the Critique of Science
5"The Earth Is the Common Home of All": Susan Fenimore Cooper's Investigations of a Settled Landscape105
6"The Relentless Drive of Life": Rachel Carson's and Loren Eiseley's Reformulation of Science and Nature134
Afterword174
Notes181
Bibliography201
Index215

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >