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Visions of Tomorrow: Science Fiction Predictions that Came True
     

Visions of Tomorrow: Science Fiction Predictions that Came True

by Tom Easton
 

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A fascinating collection of fiction-turned-reality tales. Long before movies like Minority Report and The Matrix, the world’s writers have been recording the future as it might exist—and as it turns out, they were right. This bizarre anthology collects the most stunning predictions and imagined inventions here for the first time. Visions of

Overview

A fascinating collection of fiction-turned-reality tales. Long before movies like Minority Report and The Matrix, the world’s writers have been recording the future as it might exist—and as it turns out, they were right. This bizarre anthology collects the most stunning predictions and imagined inventions here for the first time. Visions of Tomorrow includes “The Land Iron Clads” by H. G. Wells, who described a military tank in 1903—long before it was ever a possibility; “The Yesterday House” by Fritz Leiber, who writes about cloned humans; “Reason” by Isaac Asimov, who predicted solar power could be harnessed by satellites; and many more.

In this stunning anthology of never-before-collected stories, our world’s greatest science fiction writers demonstrate that the truth can be just as strange as fiction.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Identity theft, computer viruses, performance-enhancing drugs, and space elevators are just some of the innovations found in this intriguing anthology. H.G. Wells's grim pre-WWI tale "The Land Ironclads" anticipates the use of tanks in warfare. Jeff Hecht's "Directed Energy" and Thomas Easton's "Matchmaker" offer whimsical uses for high-powered lasers and genetic engineering. Robert Scheckley's black comedy "The Prize of Peril" envisions a deadly precursor to reality TV. Vonda N. McIntyre's "Misprint" foresees a printer capable of creating new organs for transplant. The atomic weapon in Cleve Cartmill's 1944 story "Deadline" proved timely enough to worry the U.S. military. Teen and adult fans of hard SF will appreciate this look back at some of the genre's most insightful work. (July)
Booklist
“Fun book.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781628730081
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
07/08/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
50,524
File size:
4 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Tom Easton is an accomplished author, reviewer, and professor of science at Thomas College in Maine. He has reviewed for the science fiction journal Analog, and his books include Classic Editions Sources: Environmental Studies, and Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Issues in Science, Technology, and Society. He lives in Waterville, Maine.

Judith Klein-Dial owns and operates GenreInk, an online retailer for genre fiction. She lives in the Greater Boston area.

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