Visual Basic Developer's Guide to ASP and IIS (Developer's Handbook Series)

Overview

The core components of Web application development for programmers using Microsoft technologies are ASP (Active Server Pages) and IIS (Internet Information Server). This book gives experienced Visual Basic developers everything they need in order to develop sophistical Web applications. The book features in-depth information on writing IIS server-side applications and coverage of the new VB WebClasses. Russell Jones is a frequent contributor to Visual Basic Programmer's Journal and a frequent speaker at industry ...
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Overview

The core components of Web application development for programmers using Microsoft technologies are ASP (Active Server Pages) and IIS (Internet Information Server). This book gives experienced Visual Basic developers everything they need in order to develop sophistical Web applications. The book features in-depth information on writing IIS server-side applications and coverage of the new VB WebClasses. Russell Jones is a frequent contributor to Visual Basic Programmer's Journal and a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780782125573
  • Publisher: Sybex, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/13/1999
  • Series: Developer's Handbook Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 7.49 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.08 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction xiv
1 Visual Basic and the Web 1
What's a Web Application? 3
Why Write a Web Application in VB? 4
What's the Difference between IIS and DHTML Applications? 6
This Book Concentrates on IIS Applications 6
2 IIS Applications 9
How Browsers Request Files 10
So Many Requests, So Little Time 12
ASP Object Model 13
Server Object 14
Application Object 15
Session Object 16
Request Object 18
Response Object 19
ScriptingContext Object 21
ObjectContext Object 22
Web Applications vs. Client-Server Applications 23
3 Building ASP Applications 27
Understanding the Structure of an ASP Application 28
Using Include Files 30
Understanding Language Independence 31
Using Cookies with ASP 32
Using the Scripting Dictionary Object 34
A (Very) Brief Introduction to HTML and Forms 39
Creating a Self-Modifying ASP Application 42
Tying It All Together--Caching Table Data 52
4 Introduction to WebClasses 65
Understanding How WebClasses Work 66
Understanding HTML Templates 71
Writing HTML without Templates 72
Exploring the WebClass Event Sequence 75
Optimize, Optimize, Optimize 77
Comparing the Advantages and Disadvantages of VB/WebClasses vs. ASP 81
5 Securing an IIS Application 87
Understand How Security Works 88
Create the Project 88
Create an HTML Template 92
Add a Custom Event 100
Add a Custom WebItem 103
Test the Security 113
Compile the Project 115
Improve Site Security 119
Take Advantage of NT Security 120
6 WebClass Debugging and Error Handling 125
Exploring the WebClass Event Sequence 126
Debugging Client-Side Script 136
Logging and Displaying Errors 140
Trapping Errors 144
Error-Handling Scenario 146
7 Controlling Program Flow 157
Understanding Program Flow 158
Creating the AccountInfo Project 159
Repurposing WebClasses 170
Using Multiple WebClasses in an Application 174
8 Maintaining State in IIS Applications 191
Selecting a State Maintenance Option 192
Maintaining State with Session Variables 194
Maintaining State with Cookies 198
Maintaining State with QueryString Variables 201
Maintaining State with Hidden Form Variables 203
Maintaining State in a Database 204
Summing Up State Maintenance Options 206
Exploring the State Maintenance Options 206
Using Session Variables to Maintain State 206
Using Cookies to Maintain State 208
Using QueryString/URLData Variables to Maintain State 208
Using Form Variables to Maintain State 209
Using Database Tables to Maintain State 210
Storing State across Sessions 219
Eliminating Obsolete Data 221
Caching Information 221
Writing a StoredRecordset Class 223
Writing a StoredDictionary Class 227
Using the CStoredRecordset and CStoredDictionary Classes 230
Summing Up State Maintenance 232
9 Dealing with Multiple Browsers 235
Understanding Differences between Browsers 236
Determining Browser Type 238
Using the Browser Capabilities Component 241
Writing Browser-Specific Code 244
Writing Browser-Specific HTML Templates 244
Writing Browser-Specific HTML from a WebClass 246
Using Replaceable Markers to Create Browser-Specific Pages 248
Writing Code with Code 248
10 Retrieving and Storing Data in Databases 251
Understanding ADO 252
Introducing the ADO Object Model 253
Opening and Closing Connections 254
Retrieving Data with ADO 256
Retrieving Data with the ADO Connection Object 256
Using ADO Cursor Types 256
Retrieving Data with the Recordset Object 257
Using ADO Record-Locking Options 259
Understanding ADO's Unfortunate Options Argument 260
Retrieving Data with the Command Object 261
Investigating Stored Procedures 265
Accessing Databases from WebClasses 273
Get In, Get the Data, Get Out 274
Write Functions to Simplify ADO 276
11 Using ActiveX DLLs from WebClasses 279
Thinking of WebClasses as Glue 280
Accessing ActiveX DLLs from WebClasses 281
Using the ObjectContext Object with WebClasses 282
Testing ActiveX DLLs from a WebClass 284
Persisting ActiveX Objects 290
Store Object Data, Not Objects 290
Automate Object Persistence and Retrieval 294
Maintain State via Object Persistence 296
Building a Browser-Based Code Repository 297
Techniques Included in the CodeRepository Project 297
12 IIS Applications and Microsoft Transaction Server 313
What Is MTS? 314
How Does MTS Fit into the IIS/Web Application Model? 317
Using Microsoft Transaction Server Explorer 317
How Can MTS Help You? 320
When Should You Use MTS? 321
How Do You Use MTS Components? 322
How Do You Move a Project into MTS? 328
Make MTS-Specific Code Changes 329
Compile the Project 329
Create and Configure an MTS Package 331
Run the Project 333
Change DCOM Permissions 334
13 Deploying WebClass Applications 339
Preparing for Deployment 340
Clean Up the Code 341
Test in Compiled Mode 342
Generate Likely Errors 342
Deploy to a Test Server 343
Beta Test the Application 343
Determine the Target Server's Configuration 344
Creating an Installation Package 345
Configuring the Target Server 347
Capture the Server Configuration Settings 348
Run the Installation 348
Dealing with Permissions Issues 350
14 What's Next? 355
Where Are Web Applications Headed? 356
What about Java and CORBA? 359
What about Database Technology? 361
What about XML? 362
Conclusion 367
Index 368
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