The Visual Design Primer / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$29.33
(Save 64%)
Est. Return Date: 06/18/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$70.40
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$53.27
(Save 35%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $26.90
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 67%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $26.90   
  • New (6) from $70.40   
  • Used (4) from $26.90   

Overview

A highly practical and compact reference for beginning designers, this easy-to-use “how-to” guide offers an abundance of step-by-step design development examples as it clearly explains the basic building blocks of design—how to stimulate creativity, the process of design (from thumbnails to layouts to comprehensives), and the immediate application of these concepts to specific design projects for print and electronic media. Begins with a quick background overview and continues with sections of design preliminaries, design components, design production, and the design profession. Explains concepts simply with many examples and illustrations. Lays a strong foundation for solving all kinds of design problems. Provides extensive, annotated examples of design development at the early stages when designers are most confused and easily discouraged, clearly demonstrating the steps to take to begin an actual design. Explores a full range of design applications in common print and electronic uses, such as advertisements, posters, pictograms, brochures, newsletters, web pages, and display presentations, and examines a full range of production issues, including printing techniques, paper selection and manufacture, and finished art preparation. Comes in a compact 5 1/2" x 8 1/8" size. For graphic designers, or those contemplating a career in design.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130280701
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/28/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 120
  • Sales rank: 1,022,772
  • Product dimensions: 5.43 (w) x 7.87 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Read an Excerpt

This books comes as a result of years of working in, teaching in, and writing about the field of design and art. It was triggered, in part, by a desire to reach out to those standing on the sidelines contemplating a career in design; to those uncertain about their own design abilities, or, more importantly, their design capabilities. It is meant to encourage others to become designers.

Considering design as a career is a big decision fraught with uncertainty. "Is this really for me?" "Am I that creative?" There is a lot of impressive design out there. Looking at it can intimidate the undecided. "I can't possibly do that:' "I'm not good enough:' All accomplished designers started in this same place. They faced the same uncertainty. They created designs that would make them cringe today. That, however, did not cause them to remain on the sidelines and seek another career path. Why not? What gave them the confidence to think they would succeed as designers?

Designers are creative, visual problem solvers, whether designing advertisements, brochures, video graphics, web sites, three-dimensional products, or skyscrapers. Just as some people speak with their hands, designers think with their fingers. They are always doodling or scribbling on paper, always converting what they think or see into a visual form. This is impossible to stop; it is the way they process information and develop solutions. It is not wasting time; it is satisfying a need; it is how they function.

For many students contemplating design as a career, acknowledging that need is what keeps pulling them back to design. What they create now is not exceptional or publishable, but it is visual, and it is satisfying. Like a diamond in the rough waiting to be cut, polished, and put out for display, the ability needs to be nurtured, honed, and disciplined. It will take several years of study and hundreds of completed projects for it to mature. The experience will be both satisfying and at times frustrating. The end result, however, will prove worth the journey and the future design solutions a testament to the right path taken.

Susan G. Wheeler Gary S. Wheeler

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Background.

Historic Milestones. Target Audience. Design Process. Professionalism.

2. Design Preliminaries.

Tools. Creative Process. Research. Seeing Design. Thumbnails, Layouts and Comps. Drawing.

3. Design Components.

Design. Type. Identity. Visuals. Color. Proofing.

4. Design Production.

Pictograms. Systems. Posters. Ads. Brochures. Newsletters. Finished Art. Paper. Printing. Web Pages. Presentations. Videos.

5. Design Profession.

Prepare. Contact. Résumé. Portfolio. Interview. Evaluate.

Glossary.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

This books comes as a result of years of working in, teaching in, and writing about the field of design and art. It was triggered, in part, by a desire to reach out to those standing on the sidelines contemplating a career in design; to those uncertain about their own design abilities, or, more importantly, their design capabilities. It is meant to encourage others to become designers.

Considering design as a career is a big decision fraught with uncertainty. "Is this really for me?" "Am I that creative?" There is a lot of impressive design out there. Looking at it can intimidate the undecided. "I can't possibly do that:' "I'm not good enough:' All accomplished designers started in this same place. They faced the same uncertainty. They created designs that would make them cringe today. That, however, did not cause them to remain on the sidelines and seek another career path. Why not? What gave them the confidence to think they would succeed as designers?

Designers are creative, visual problem solvers, whether designing advertisements, brochures, video graphics, web sites, three-dimensional products, or skyscrapers. Just as some people speak with their hands, designers think with their fingers. They are always doodling or scribbling on paper, always converting what they think or see into a visual form. This is impossible to stop; it is the way they process information and develop solutions. It is not wasting time; it is satisfying a need; it is how they function.

For many students contemplating design as a career, acknowledging that need is what keeps pulling them back to design. What they create now is not exceptional or publishable, but it is visual, and it is satisfying. Like a diamond in the rough waiting to be cut, polished, and put out for display, the ability needs to be nurtured, honed, and disciplined. It will take several years of study and hundreds of completed projects for it to mature. The experience will be both satisfying and at times frustrating. The end result, however, will prove worth the journey and the future design solutions a testament to the right path taken.

Susan G. Wheeler
Gary S. Wheeler

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)