Visual Paraphrasing of Poetry: A SourceBook for Teachers & Readers

Overview

Visual Paraphrasing introduces a method for helping students from high school through college to read poetry with more accuracy and personal involvement. Like verbal paraphrasing, sketches help the reader see what is literally described in a poem, what is not, and what is ambiguous. The technique combines traditional interpretive ends with means compatible with reader-response theory and process-oriented writing approaches. The book contains an introduction relating the technique to literary theory, for those ...
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Overview

Visual Paraphrasing introduces a method for helping students from high school through college to read poetry with more accuracy and personal involvement. Like verbal paraphrasing, sketches help the reader see what is literally described in a poem, what is not, and what is ambiguous. The technique combines traditional interpretive ends with means compatible with reader-response theory and process-oriented writing approaches. The book contains an introduction relating the technique to literary theory, for those interested in such issues. Those primarily concerned with helping students learn to read poetic language may skip to the examples, which move from the extremely simple to the sublimely complex. Examples of the technique applied to prose are also included, as are some related applications of drawing for the teaching of literature (maps, schemata of world-views, and illustration as opposed to visual paraphrase).

Author Biography: Donna Richardson is Associate Professor of English at St. Mary's College in St. Mary's, Maryland.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780819188205
  • Publisher: University Press of America
  • Publication date: 11/19/1992
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 222
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Donna Richardson is Associate Professor of English at St. Mary's College in St. Mary's, Maryland.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
A Visual Paraphrasing and Literary Theory
B How This Book May Be Used
1 The Design in "Design" 1
2 Drawing Ironic Conclusions in "Ozymandias" 5
3 The Position of the Ball Turret Gunner 9
4 Irony in Gold and Bronze: Homer's Versus Auden's Shield of Achilles 11
5 Unidentified Objects in Dickinson and Plath 21
6 Getting a Perspective on Tennyson 27
7 A Room With a View; Or, the Symbolic Undercurrent of "Dover Beach" 31
8 Counting Sheep on Housman's Moonlit Heath 37
9 Seeing as Well as Hearing "The Telephone" 41
10 Close Encounters With Dickinson's Narrow Fellow 43
11 The Look of the Edmund Fitzgerald 47
12 Peering Through the Ancient Mariner's Dungeon Grate 51
13 Piecing Together the Images in "Pied Beauty" 53
14 The Caged Skylark and the Cages of the Soul 57
15 The Flight of the Windhover 61
16 Insight Into Inscape and Instress in "God's Grandeur" 65
17 What Does Not Become a Man: Irony in Henry V 67
18 Strange Fits of Perception 71
19 Facing Plath's "Mirror" 75
20 The Faces of Nature and Man in Hardy 79
21 A Valedation of Donne's Compasses 85
22 I Will Draw You Fear in a Handful of Dust in "The Waste Land" 89
23 That State of Mind Thou Mayest in Me Behold: Shakespeare's Sonnet #73 91
24 Unmasking the Disguise in "A Horse With No Name" 95
25 On Looking More Carefully Into "Chapman's Homer" 99
26 Raising Jupiter's Image in Prometheus Unbound 105
27 Sleight-Of-Eye Tricks: Constantly Risking Visual Absurdity 111
28 "Ars Poetica": How Visual Are Imagist Images? 117
29 Yeats: An Interlude Without Pictures 119
30 The Picture of the Mind in "Tintern Abbey" 123
31 Seeing Veil'd Melancholy's Sovran Shrine 127
32 The Scene and the Unseen on a Grecian Urn 133
33 Building That Dome in Air in "Kubla Khan" 139
34 Minute Particulars in a "Memorable Fancy" 145
35 The Nature of Nature in Romantic Poems: Landscapes in "Tintern Abbey," "Mont Blanc," And "This Lime-Tree Bower, My Prison" 153
36 Looking Steadily at the Subject on Mount Snowdon 163
37 Some Prose Applications: Kafka's Harrow, Napoleon's Most Ridiculous Moment, the Bovarys' Bourgeois Icons, Lawrence's Lanterns, and the Light in Heart of Darkness 169
38 Visual Outlining With Maps in Prose and Poetry 181
39 The Visual Company: Diagramming Romantic Epistemologies and World-Views 185
A Wordsworth
B Coleridge
C Shelley
D Blake, Byron, and Keats
40 From Paraphrasing to Illustration: "To Autumn" 199
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