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Visual Thinking Strategies for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Language of Pictures
     

Visual Thinking Strategies for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Language of Pictures

by Ellyn Lucas Arwood
 
Visuals of all kinds (photographs, checklists, line drawings, cartoons, flowcharts, stick figures, etc.) are commonly used as supports for individuals on the autism spectrum who tend to think and learn visually. However, not all visuals are created equal and, therefore, visuals don't all work equally well. This companion to Learning With a Visual Brain in an Auditory

Overview

Visuals of all kinds (photographs, checklists, line drawings, cartoons, flowcharts, stick figures, etc.) are commonly used as supports for individuals on the autism spectrum who tend to think and learn visually. However, not all visuals are created equal and, therefore, visuals don't all work equally well. This companion to Learning With a Visual Brain in an Auditory World helps the reader understand how to match the developmental levels of pictures and visuals to the developmental level of the person looking at the visual. In this way, appropriate visuals provide the language development for children with autism spectrum disorders. Drawing from their experience with children and youth for decades, the authors also show how effective communication can help reduce the confusion and anxiety that often lead to behavioral outbursts.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Cathi I. White
Everyone thinks in pictures. But not all pictures are alike. If you were to think of Christopher Columbus, what kind of picture would you draw in your mind? You may think of ships, America, the queen of Spain, the flat world, or other ideas. If you were to draw your picture on paper it would be completely different from someone else's idea of Columbus. As a result, each person may think that their ideas are right and the others are wrong. But that is not the case. Each person thinks about any subject based on their knowledge and experience with that subject. This highly informative book details visuals and how people think about them. This book was written to help explain how a child with autism may picture things differently than others. In order for language to provide meaning, there has to be an understanding in pictures first. Then oral and written language comes next. The concepts behind this truth are thoroughly taught. Readers will learn how to help children with autism understand objects and ideas. They will learn how to take simple pictures and explain enough with drawings and words to help provide meaning. Children with autism lack this skill and need to learn it. This excellent book will help parents and educators alike to reach children they may have thought were unreachable through simple pictures. Reviewer: Cathi I. White

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934575505
Publisher:
Autism Asperger Publishing Company
Publication date:
07/01/2009
Pages:
199
Sales rank:
904,449
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.60(d)

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