Viva Flamenco

Viva Flamenco

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While the innovators of nouveau flamenco civilized their fiery guitar stylings to reach a broader audience, the traditional form has continued to spark new spirit along the gypsy path. The 14 guitarists featured on Viva Flamenco may not all have flamenco in their bloodlines, but the music is gripped by the rawer elements of the traditional style: raw

Overview

While the innovators of nouveau flamenco civilized their fiery guitar stylings to reach a broader audience, the traditional form has continued to spark new spirit along the gypsy path. The 14 guitarists featured on Viva Flamenco may not all have flamenco in their bloodlines, but the music is gripped by the rawer elements of the traditional style: raw vocals (José Mercé on "Primavera") and the ferocious energy of stamping heels and rapid palmas (the dual guitars of De Madera's "La Enredadera"). The scuffing and stomping not only charges the pieces with an organic rhythm, but also adds the element of witness, of participation, as if the whole village were learning the shocking story for the first time. A palmas-spurred "Olé!" is the perfect accent for the virtuoso guitar work of Pepe Habichuela. Diego Carrasco begins his "Nana de Colores" with a swaying, sultry cadence, carrying on a two-soloist conversation with choral comments. The solos are unusually soulful too: Tomalito's "Montoya" showcases delicate ornamentation, lyrical melody lines, harshly picked accents, and fistfuls of chords. When fusions do occur, they take the form of authentic alliances. Gino D'Auri's "Barrio Santiago" parries at blistering speed with a tabla, perhaps recalling the gypsies' roots in India; the percussion duet of Geraldo Núñez's "Sevilla" also hearkens back to India. Rafael Riqueni creates an undercurrent of gypsy drama with a string section. The humble flute gives guitarist Migues de la Bastide a run for his money on the rapid-fire "El Cambio." Pacio de Lucio, Guadiana, El Viejin, and Chuscales round out this extraordinary compilation with dramatic flair, allowing the listener not only to experience the flamenco community but also to enter the seductive inner spaces of the guitar. The only thing lacking on this album are liner notes about each composition and the contributing musicians. Otherwise, Viva Flamenco fires on all pistons.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Zac Johnson
A collection of tracks by contemporary flamenco artists, some instrumental and a few with vocals, demonstrating the fiery sensual power of the acoustic guitar and hand percussion that is flamenco.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/15/2000
Label:
Narada
UPC:
0724384961329
catalogNumber:
49613

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Paco de Lucía   Track Performer
Pepe Habichuela   Track Performer
Gino d'Auri   Track Performer
Gerardo Nuñez   Track Performer
Tomatito   Track Performer
Diego Carrasco   Track Performer
Guadiana   Track Performer
Rafael Riqueni   Track Performer
Jose Manuel Canizares   Track Performer
José Mercé   Track Performer
Viejin   Track Performer
Miguel de la Bastide   Track Performer
Chuscales   Track Performer
Madera   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Gino d'Auri   Composer
Traditional   Composer

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