VMware 2 for Linux

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Are you tired of the "one machine, one operating system" model of computing? VMware 2.0 frees you from this constraint and enables multiple operating systems and applications to run concurrently on a single machine without disk partitioning or rebooting. VMware 2.0 for Linux is written to help you run Windows applications, such as Outlook, while running your favorite flavor of Linux. This reliable reference walks you through installing VMware, editing configuration files, and installing operating systems to run ...
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Overview

Are you tired of the "one machine, one operating system" model of computing? VMware 2.0 frees you from this constraint and enables multiple operating systems and applications to run concurrently on a single machine without disk partitioning or rebooting. VMware 2.0 for Linux is written to help you run Windows applications, such as Outlook, while running your favorite flavor of Linux. This reliable reference walks you through installing VMware, editing configuration files, and installing operating systems to run on it. For both corporate and home users, VMware 2.0 for Linux will show you how to increase productivity and save time by using VMware 2.0 to avoid launching the Windows OS every time you want to work with Windows software. The included CD-ROM contains a trial version of VMware, with special pre-installs courtesy of VMware.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761527640
  • Publisher: Premier Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2000
  • Series: Linux Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 7.37 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Jason Compton is a contributing editor for LinuxMagazine. He is also a regular contributor to the Chicago Tribune, Smart Business, and CRM Magazine.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Understanding VMware

You can buy all the computer hardware you likes-the fastest CPU, the biggest hard drive, the most memory, and the clearest monitors-but it's all useless without software to run on your computer. Most of the time, the software that runs on a computer is limited by how compatible that software is with the hardware inside your computer, as well as the operating system you happen to use.

Software written for Linux will work on any PC running Linux, provided that the PC has enough speed, memory, and storage space to support the program. Similarly, software written for a Windows 98 PC will run on any PC with Windows 98, as long as the PC is physically up to the challenge. By running Windows, Linux, or any other operating system on a computer, you make a choice to limit yourself to using just the software available for that particular operating system.

One of the best ways to evaluate the power of a computer is by how much software it can run. So naturally, many people want to broaden their horizons.

Until recently, Linux users faced with the need to run software for another operating system had a limited range of choices. They could buy another computer and run it side-by-side with their Linux PCs. Of course, this works well but can be very expensive, and it is murder on your desk space. Linux users also turned to dual booting-generally installing their favorite flavor of Linux, as well as the version of Windows they needed most on their PCs or laptops. after all, modern hard drives are large enough to support several full OS installs, with room to spare.

Finally, there were emulators such as Wine, Bochs, and DOSEMU. These programs enabled users to run a relatively small subset of DOS- and Windows-compatible programs inside their Linux environments. But they all suffered from at least one fatal flaw-too limited, too unstable, too hard to configure.

a Primer on Virtual Machines and Emulators

Before you can understand the scope and power of VMware, it's important to understand the technology of emulation and virtual machines, how they differ, and how they help you expand your Linux PC's potential.

Emulators

Generally speaking, an emulator is a program that enables you to run software that was not originally intended for your computer's hardware and OS combination. That can be a relatively small step (such as running a Windows program on a Pentiumbased Linux PC, something that the PC is normally capable of if it isn't running Linux at the time) or a dramatic departure from the norm (such as running Macintosh, apple II, or Commodore amiga software on your PC).

Emulators generally, but not always, multitask with the host operating system, meaning that your desktop is behaving like two (or more) different computers at once.

To work their magic, emulator authors describe the functionality of a computer's hardware in software. For example, emulating an amiga on a Pentium-based Linux computer requires a complete description of the operation of the amiga's 68000scries CPU, as well as special code to replicate the amiga's custom video display and sound capabilities. Inside the emulation window is a virtual computer that believes it is an assembly-line fresh amiga computer, but it is really just a construct of the Linux operating system.

When a program runs inside an emulator, it can't tell the difference. It doesn't know that it's being fooled into running on a Linux PC. So it tries to run exactly as it would on the real computer it was designed for, calling on a CPU and hardware it expects to be there. Of course, that hardware isn't on your computer. Instead, the emulator traps those requests, interprets what the result should be, and sends the information back to the program inside the emulator. at the same time, when the emulated program sends out video or sound information, the emulator intercepts the information and translates it into video and audio that Linux can handle. Sec Figure 1.1 for a (very basic) illustration of the inner workings of an emulator. For starters, acceptable emulator performance requires a large amount of system RaM, preferably as much available RaM as the target emulation system normally needs. Good emulators allow you to select how much you want the emulated computer to have. Many emulators also grab much more-several megabytes, depending on the emulator-to provide a fast buffer for the intense computations required to run an emulation...

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Part I: Installing and Configuring VMware
Chapter 1: Understanding VMware
A Primer on Virtual Machines and Emulators
Emulators
Virtual Machines
Simulators
VMware Versus "Dual Booting"
VMware Versus DOS and Windows Emulators
Emulation, like Fine Wine
DOSEMU
Bochs: Full PC Emulation
Conclusion
Chapter 2: Understanding How VMware Works
Sharing the CPU
Creating an Isolated Environment
Nonpersistent Disks
Undoable Disks
What Hardware Can VMware Share?
Mice
Keyboards
Video Cards
Fixed Storage (Hard Drives)
Removable Media (CD-ROMs, Zip Drives)
Expansion Ports (Serial, Parallel, USB)
Printers and Scanners
Modems and Network Cards
SCSI
Sound Cards
PCMCIA/PC Cards
What Software Can VMware Run?
Guest Operating Systems
Unsupported Guest Operating Systems
Software Compatibility
Conclusion
Chapter 3: Equipping Your PC for VMware
Identifying Your Emulation Needs
Updating Linux, if Necessary
Speed Is King
How Much Memory Is Enough?
Drive Space: You're Providing for Two (or More)
Making Room
Allocating Drive Space
Raw Disks
Plain Disks
Conclusion
Chapter 4: Installing VMware for Linux
Installing from the Included CD
Deciding How You Want to Network
Obtaining and Installing a License Key
Requesting a License Key
Installing the Trial License Key
Troubleshooting the Install
Checking for Updates Online
Conclusion
Chapter 5: Running VMware for the First Time
Launching VMware
VMware's Configuration Menus
File Menu
Power Menu
Settings Menu
Devices Menu
View Menu
Help Menu
Using the Configuration Wizard
Using the Configuration Editor
IDE Drives
SCSI Drives
Floppy Drives
Ethernet Adapters
Serial Ports
Parallel Ports
Mouse
Sound
Memory
Guest OS
Misc
Conclusion
Part II: Guest Operating Systems in VMware
Chapter 6: Installing Windows 98 in VMware
Choosing Between Windows 95 and Windows 98
Preparing the Virtual Machine
Starting with the Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing Windows 98
Testing the Installation
Installing VMware Tools
Installing Windows 98 Applications
Conclusion
Chapter 7: Installing Windows 95 in VMware
Choosing Between Windows 95 and Windows 98
Preparing the Virtual Machine
Starting with the Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing Windows 95
Performing Preliminary Tasks
Carrying Out the Main Installation
Testing the Installation
Installing VMware Tools
Installing Windows 95 Applications
Conclusion
Chapter 8: Understanding the VMware Tools for Windows
Accessing the VMware Toolbox
Using the Toolbox Options
Release Input Focus
Capture Input Focus
Scroll When Mouse Nears Edge
Hide Cursor
Bring the Virtual Machine to Top
Allow Copy and Paste
Time Synchronization
Managing Virtual Devices
Managing Virtual Disks
Prepare for Shrinking
Shrinking Virtual Disks
Conclusion
Chapter 9: Using Your Windows 95/98 Virtual Machine
Sharing Files
Swapping Files over FTP
Mounting a Virtual Disk in Linux
Sharing Documents
Sharing Images
Sharing the Network
Conclusion
Chapter 10: Installing Linux on VMware
Why Run Linux on Linux?
Carbon-Copy Your Desktop
Expand Your Horizons
Preparing the Installation
Running the Configuration Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing Linux in a Virtual Machine
Installing VMware Tools
Managing Virtual Devices
Using the Toolbox Options
Release Input Focus
Capture Input Focus
Scroll When Mouse Nears Edge
Hide Cursor
Bring the Virtual Machine to Top
Allow Copy and Paste
Time Synchronization
Managing Virtual Disks
Preparing for Shrinking
Sharing Between a Linux Host and a Linux Guest
Sharing Files via FTP
Sharing an Internet Connection
Mounting a Virtual Disk on the Host
Conclusion
Chapter 11: Installing Windows NT 4 in VMware
Preparing the Virtual Machine
Starting with the Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing Windows NT Workstation
Installing Windows NT 4 Server
Upgrading Windows NT and Installing VMware Tools
Installing a Service Pack Upgrade
Installing VMware Tools
Installing Sound Support
Using a Windows NT Virtual Machine
Using Windows NT Services
Configuring the IIS FTP Server
Configuring the IIS Web Server
Conclusion
Chapter 12: Installing Windows 2000 in VMware
Preparing the Virtual Machine
Starting with the Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing Windows 2000 Server
Installing Windows 2000 Professional
Installing VMware Tools
Using a Windows 2000 Virtual Machine
Using Windows 2000 Services
Configuring the IIS FTP Server
Configuring the IIS Web Server
Conclusion
Chapter 13: Installing FreeBSD on VMware
Exploring the "Other" UNIX Alternative
Preparing the Installation
Running the Configuration Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing FreeBSD in a Virtual Machine
Installing VMware Tools
Sharing Between a Linux Host and a FreeBSD Guest
Conclusion
Chapter 14: Installing DOS and Windows 3.1 in VMware
DOS Survives, After All These Years
Preparing the Virtual Machine
Starting with the Wizard
Adjustments with the Configuration Editor
Installing DOS in VMware
Installing the DOS Core
Installing Peripheral Support
Applications and Limitations in DOS
Installing Useful Programs
Working Around VMware-Related Limitations
Networking in DOS: Tricky, but Possible
Installing Windows 3.1 in VMware
Converting a DOS Virtual Machine
Installing and Configuring Windows 3.1
Installing Sound Support in Windows 3.1
Conclusion
Chapter 15: Playing Games with VMware
The Bad News: Compatibility Hurdles
The Good News: Games That Work
Configuration Tips for Games
DOS Gaming Configuration
Windows Gaming Configuration
Conclusion
Part III: Other Virtual Machines and Emulators
Chapter 16: Using Wine with VMware
Wine Is Not an Emulator
Installing Wine
Using Wine to Run Windows Programs
Conclusion
Chapter 17: Emulating the Macintosh
Understanding Macintosh Compatibility
The Evolving Apple
Making a Decision
Making Sense of Legalities
Using ARDI Executor
Installing ARDI Executor
Running Macintosh Programs in Executor
Configuring Executor
Understanding Executor's Limits
Using Basilisk II
Installing Basilisk II
Configuring Basilisk II
Installing Macintosh Programs in Basilisk II
Conclusion
Chapter 18: Exploring More Emulators
Using UAE Amiga Emulator for Linux
Installing UAE
Running Amiga Programs Through UAE
Using MAME Arcade Game Emulator for Linux
Installing MAME for Linux
Playing Arcade Games with MAME
Using VICE Commodore 64 Emulator for Linux
Installing VICE for Linux
Running Programs in VICE
Running Other Emulators
Conclusion
Part IV: Appendixes
Appendix A: Using Advanced VMware Configurations
Understanding Advanced Disk Types
Creating Raw Disks
Creating Plain Disks
Understanding the Virtual Machine BIOS
Using the BIOS Configuration Screens
Conclusion
Appendix B: File Sharing with Samba and NFS VMware
File Sharing with Samba
Configuring the VMware Samba Server
Using Samba with a Windows Guest
Using Samba with a Linux Guest
File Sharing with NFS
Using NFS with a Linux Guest
Using NFS with a Windows Guest
Conclusion
Index
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